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Miami Metro Population Passes 6 Million For The First Time

The Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Fla., metro area added about 75,000 people between 2014 and 2015 to surpass 6 million in population, the Census Bureau reported today.

The Miami Metro area is now one of just eight metros with a population above 6 million.

Much of the growth came from international migration. Dade added 44,000 new residents that came from overseas, the second highest rate of any county in the nation.

Overall, Dade has added more new residents than all but six U.S. counties since 2010.

 

 

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17 Comments on "Miami Metro Population Passes 6 Million For The First Time"

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Oscar
Oscar

Love the news on population growth but this underscores that there is some major untapped economic potential in Miami. We are currently #8 in terms of population size but are #12 based on GDP. Among the top 10 most populous metros, we have the lowest per capita GDP (27% below the average). Among the 35 largest metros by GDP, we rank #29 in GDP per capita. We have 2.5 million people more than Seattle but roughly the same size economy. Moreover, we’re not making up ground. Since 2010, we rank #12 in population growth and #13 in GDP growth. Lots of work to be done in this area.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Our GDP stats are distorted by a large retiree population.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The retiree population has nothing to do with it. If anything, they are helping drive the service industry, which is the largest industry in the region. South Florida lacks a diversified and well balanced white collar sector. The wages in the region per GDP are probably the lowest out of the other large metro areas. When you look at Miami in particular, it is distinctly missing a middle class work force and population. You either have it or you don’t in Miami. These other metro areas aren’t so top and bottom heavy.

Fredric
Fredric
Many people do not yet realize that retirees are not as significant a share of the Miami SMSA population as was the case in the past. Currently, those over 65 years of age make up about 15 percent of the tri-county population, which is only slightly above the average for metro areas nationwide. Remove Palm Beach county from the equation and the percentage drops to around 13.5 to 14 percent. Back in the 1980s, the three county region counted as much as 23 percent of its population in the 65+ age group. Even though aging baby boomers are now growing the retiree population very rapidly in the US as a whole, in South Florida there is a rebalancing taking place in the age demographics profile. This is happening because of increased foreign immigration into the region, as those immigrants are considerably younger, on average, than the non-immigrant populace. Also, the increasingly densely populated and increasingly urban makeup of the South Florida population has caused the Miami SMSA to become steadily less and less attractive to retirees looking to relocate from outside of Florida and many others leave the area for less crowded locales when they attain retirement status while living… Read more »
Anonymous
Anonymous

would be neat to see a comparison of rapid transit systems of the 10 largest cities. i imagine miami would be at the bottom of the above list.

Dave
Dave

Probably better than Houston or Dallas but behind all the others. A little behind Atlanta and light years behind the rest.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Houston and Dallas both have more rail than Miami. Additionally the Houston one is very successful, so yes Miami losses to even cities in Texas.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Houston has a tiny 20 mile lightrail line that nobody rides. Try again.

Transitlover
Transitlover

Houston’s bus system is better than ours and at least they are expanding their rail system.

AA
AA

Just google “Miami Lack of Transit” and one of the first few image results is a great graphic comparing our metrorail to several other major cities world wide.

lola
lola

Who needs rapid transit when we have 6 million cars?

AA
AA

Definitely going to be top 5 within just a few years.

Jesus
Jesus

Unlikely the top five but the top six? Yes. Houston and Dallas metro areas add more people on a percentage and numbers basis. They are projected to each be 9 to 10 million people by 2030. Miami is projected to be 8 million by then. So while we will surpass Washington and Philly as they are not growing as fast as we are due to housing costs, taxes, the jobs that are available, weather, we will. So number 6 by 2030 is certainly a given

Anonymous
Anonymous

Philly will be surpassed by the end of this year. Miami will add another 75k at least, and Philly is stagnant. Washington will be left behind by the end of 2017

Anonymous
Anonymous

Not to rain on your parade, but DC and Baltimore are tallied as separate metro areas, yet downtown DC and downtown Baltimore are only 37 miles apart, and their suburbs overlap. Add the two together and your talking about a combined statistical area of close to 10 million with completely integrated transit and workforce.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Won’t be long before we pass Philadelphia and D.C.

lola
lola

I wonder if we have 6 million cars?

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