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Sunny Isles Approves Twin, 56-Story Condo/Hotel Towers Proposed By Fortune & Chateau

Sunny Isles Approves Twin, 56-Story Condo/Hotel Towers Proposed By Fortune & Chateau

Despite opposition from area residents, Sunny Isles commissioners voted last week to approve twin 649-foot towers at 18801 Collins Avenue.

Developers Chateau Group and Fortune International are building a project with 431 condo units, 90 condo/hotel, and 60 hotel units. The two towers will be built to the maximum height permitted for the area, and is being built as of right.

One speaker at the meeting who claimed to be an engineer questioned the structural integrity of tall towers being built on the beach. She said that she watched engineers at Porsche Design Tower struggle to remove water from the foundation there, and said she feared that building would topple.

UNStudio and Trachtenberg architects are design consultants for the project.

 

 

 

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Anonymous
Anonymous

Who makes these renders? You mean to tell me your building a condo in which you have to do presentations and get people excited about the build with some dark crappy renders.

Anon-e-mouse
Anon-e-mouse

First, these are pictures of the renders and not the actual ones. Secondly a person who claims to be an engineer ( there are many different kinds of engineers) should understand basic physics and would know that buildings don’t just topple over, that is why structural engineers exist. Thirdly, if this person really know about all the the problems that go into building a high rise, she would not be saying much. Anyway, this is the typical response when anybody presents a project to the public. Usually the only people who show up come to complain.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The problem isn’t structural integrity or overcrowding, it’s building billions of dollars more of property every year a few hundred feet from the ocean in the most at risk area possible. When a storm and higher tides inevitably come there will be some damage, who knows how much, and the general public will be on the hook to financially help the condo owners. We’re already doing this through the state (publicly) subsidized insurance system. Even if there were no direct costs involved, there will be major negative impacts on the larger local economy from the damage to these properties. It’s a disaster waiting to happen that gets worse every year.

Anonymous
Anonymous

They probably don’t want to live in the shadow – not that i blame them.