289-Unit Apartment Complex Proposed In Allapattah, With Hidden Garage & Courtyard

Plans for an Allapattah apartment complex have been submitted to the Urban Development Review Board by Legacy Residential.

The Santa Clara Metrorail station is a seven minute walk away, according to Google Maps.

A master-planned urbanist community has been proposed across the street by NR Investments, with 2,500 residential units, retail, hotel, office, and green space.

The Legacy project is proposed to rise 8 stories and include:

  • 289 residential units
  • 3,750 square feet of retail
  • 368 parking spaces in a lined garage

The garage appears to be completely hidden, lined on all sides by residential and retail.

In addition, the architect has designed an internal courtyard which apartments look out onto.

Several Miami 21 zoning waivers are being requested. A letter from the developer states:

In line with Miami 21’s intent, this project will revitalize the existing underutilized land into a vibrant development that will bring additional housing opportunities to the neighborhood, promote a pedestrian-friendly center, bring retail to activate the public realm, and improve the area’s vibrancy.

Corwil is the architect.

The UDRB Hearing is scheduled for November 16.

 

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Azarius
17 days ago

The health district is ripe for workforce/affordable housing developments close to transit but not Prime real estate, still in a community with Great potential

Anonymous
17 days ago

The northern segment of MetroRail is about to get a nice makeover.

Pleezzee
17 days ago

There are hundred and hundred of acres that need it.

Anonymous
14 days ago

Agree there are dozens of lots available on NW 20th street, 36th street, and 27th avenue. 36th street especially as all the old car dealerships are gone… you can duplicate this a hundred times over and still have land. 27th ave corridor north of 112 has so much land as well to add density. Allapattah is surrounded by metro stations and even with heavy traffic is about 10-15min from Downtown, Health District, Airport, Doral Indistructial, etc.

Anonymous
17 days ago

Love the design and smart hidden garage! They should develop low-midrise buildings like this in West Brickell to liven up pedestrian retail, while maintaining the neighborhood feel.

Eventually, the entire riverfront from Allapattah to Brickell will be prime real estate. The riverfront will be a tourism and residential magnet for people looking to bike or walk along the river to Biscayne Bay.

Shawn Kouri
17 days ago

It already seems like that smart community is already spurring development in the surrounding area. This would be a good example.

Melo is sigma and Chad
17 days ago

This area has alot of potential

Anonymon
17 days ago

It’s very unsafe currently.

Annon,
9 days ago

What do you mean?

Anonymous
17 days ago

Solid development, although could do without the silly alternating concrete brackets. It’s this sort of height and density we need along Miami’s major streets. You don’t need to arbitrarily upzone places for giant cereal boxes atop parking garages.

Anonymous
17 days ago

Absolutely! Denser doesn’t need to be taller. This is perfect height for building out in west and south Brickell, while east and north can fill out tall. It’s too much to box in an area with all talls. We need building like these around the talls.

Anonymous
17 days ago

Anything around the I-95 should be low-mid rise new modern luxury developments, to be a proper gateway to the City and these areas are the most valuable high level real estate aside from the waterfront.

MINDSET
17 days ago

I”ll never understand why some people think that building low to mid-rise is the appropriate thing to do because otherwise, it’ll affect their sensibility?

Anonymous
16 days ago

Because Florida is flat, and people need to see the sky and sunlight to thrive. Also to make a vibrant walkable community there needs to be a proper scale (ratio between the size a person and building) to create an inviting pedestrian/retail experience – that is what we all benefit from ultimately.

army corps of engineers
16 days ago

alright sim city playa

Anonymous
16 days ago

Dear Army Corps of Engineers,

I loved that game and hope you did too. It spawned the creativity in us at an early age. Glad that creativity can be seen in the development of Miami.

Also, I’m glad you’ve decided to incorporate natural barriers into the flood engineering plan along Brickell. The proposed design, referenced in the article below, looks beautiful. It protects against flooding and gives people a public space to walk and enjoy scenic natural views, which is what makes this area unique. The water still feels accessible, rather than completely blocked. It brings urban engineering into the landscape.

It’s an investment into America’s future and we value your service. We are very grateful for your patience and help with this project!

https://wusfnews.wusf.usf.edu/environment/2022-11-06/stilt-homes-raised-roads-huge-wall-can-miami-dade-stay-safe-from-storm-surge

army corps of engineers
14 days ago

cant wait to build 20 ft.wall on the west side of biscayne just north of 36th street…we wrote off sabal palm and morningside neighborhoods

Drac
17 days ago

“Solid development, although could do without the silly alternating concrete brackets”

That’s an essentiality

anonymous
17 days ago

Thumbs up to a hidden parking structure. However, a greater than 1:1 parking ratio is still undesirable for an urban area that *needs* to become less car centric.

Azarius
17 days ago

The parking is needed, they don’t have all the resources and transit options as other locations downtown.

Qtip
17 days ago

You know the best way to get people to stop driving and use public transportation? Choke the city streets full of traffic….I welcome all the parking spots so should you! Besides this area isn’t even in downtown a car is needed.

Drac
17 days ago

Why are some people like you so concerned about parking?

Qtip
17 days ago

Cause without a car it’s take someone over an hour to get to south beach, also kinda makes dating a pain without a car. Why are people like you so worried about condos having parking spots, even if someone doesn’t use a car everyday doesn’t mean that most people don’t need to use a car several times a week.

Drac
17 days ago

For your information Qtip, I wasn’t talking to you, I was talking to the first anonymous comment.

Melo, the true giga chad
16 days ago

Interesting design. So basically there will be a hallway that wraps around the each level of the parking garage which leads to the units. Every mid rise building should be designed like this.

Anonymous
16 days ago

Looks like more apartments for renting instead of purchasing

kamchatka
11 days ago

chernobyl stylings.

BDub
17 days ago

Revitalize, vibrant, pedestrian-friendly, activate plus the free space gives me bingo on my RE jargon bingo card.

Thesenutts
9 days ago

Building more homes than fixing the roads a damn shame with these big pot holes in the road it’s about to get worse or they might just fix the road near the building to make it look nice Miami soon gone be for just the white’s and Hispanics only moving black’s out of Miami for sure

melo in my cheeks
16 days ago

just in time for the glut and recession….another half full build….get real

Hotel
16 days ago

No affordable housing? No shovel then.

Anonymous
16 days ago

Haha.. Hotel is going to “make” somebody spend their money the way he wants them to spend it.

real estate BS
16 days ago

HOW MANY AFFORDABLE UNITS?

Sry
17 days ago

Very dangerous part of town

I love to assume
17 days ago

I’ll assume you don’t go there anyway…

Michael
17 days ago

Nice building, but it could use brighter colors.

Anonymous
17 days ago

Please no brighter colors. This isn’t 2001–and these colors in some buildings look very dated now.

Muted cool greys and warm greiges are timeless and elegant and in line with the elevated style of Brickell and Downtown. Design as many bright colors as you want in a funky interior communal space or individual unit, but keep the City looking beautiful and cohesive that can evolve better of time!

Michael
17 days ago

This is not Chicago or London. Miami is bold and brash and brighter colors ostend that quality.

Michael
17 days ago

And also tropical.

Anonymous
17 days ago

You’re right, this isn’t Chicago or London, where the landscape turns gray 6 months of the year.

We have blue skies and lots of bold shades of green from our landscaping all year around!

The natural bright colors of our landscape shine beautifully against the muted tones of this development and others alike.

The problem with bringing in too many bright colors onto building facades in a dense areas makes it look “busy” and less natural. Colors can be polarizing- what one person finds to be a happy yellow, another can find to be irritating.

This is great because it’s something that goes well in any area, it’s popular, any time, and flows with the new Miami aesthetic.

Bright colors work great for fine details visible from up close. Also bright colors work well in decor that can be changed when trends change, not on the walls outside – Miami is tropically sophisticated with grays, greige, white, warm sand and wood tones throughout.

Anonymon
17 days ago

Tell that to wynwood

Anonymous
17 days ago

Wynnwood is Wynnwood. Bright bold colors work there.

Neon and white works in Miami Beach.

The growing downtown and Brickell area have modern neutral palletes that work better in these dense areas.

Coral gables has beautiful Mediterranean colors. I’d like to see more Mediterranean colors tied into other parts, as a modern neoclassical coastal revival.

I personally love calming coastal colors, like pale blues and greens mixed with white, beige and grey.

Anonymous
16 days ago

Exactly, I like to call them “spa colors” – Miami Dade should create an approved pallet of sophisticated coastal “spa colors” so there there are some interesting variations of shade but there is a cohesive unity among the overall city design .

Michael
14 days ago

Why would bright colors work in Wynwood and not Allapattah? No difference in climate or topography.

Anonymous
17 days ago

Bring back pink and neon, baby!

Anonymous
16 days ago

Sorry
You’re mistaken
Trees in the cities you mentioned are awash in color in the Spring and come Fall explode in hues of yellow, orange, red and brown

Anonymous
16 days ago

It is beautiful to see the seasons up North, but they don’t last long from what I recall. I lived there over a decade. A short burst of color comes in when weather transitions twice a year, but Dec-April appeared to be mostly monotone.

Michael
14 days ago

So then we have blue and green as a our colors? No reds, purples, yellows, or shades in between. Not a very expansive palette.

Anonymous
17 days ago

So why have all Arquitectonica’s gunmetal grey boxes built in the last ten years aged poorly while towers from the last real estate bubble would hold just as well if proposed today?

Anonymous
17 days ago

They’re still building the “gunmetal gray” designs because they are timeless and modern.

Always loved Miami style, but the recent modernization of Brickell, with gray and neutral tones, has brought a complimentary sophistication to the city. Not to mention that it cools down the temperature with the warm amber sun that we get.

Miami is now more than just a vacation destination. It’s a year around residence so some areas should have soothing colors like this design.

Anonymous
17 days ago

This does have color. It has the stylish walnut color in the façade. That is just enough color to liven up the place without making it look tacky.

Anon
17 days ago

Building will look very dated in 10 years

Anonymous
17 days ago

So will you.

Anan
17 days ago

Classic.

Alcoholiotic
17 days ago

Excellent comeback!