$320 Million Sawyer’s Landing Near Brightline’s MiamiCentral Targets May 1 Groundbreaking

Sawyer’s Landing, a mixed-use project near Brightline’s MiamiCentral, is targeting a May 1 groundbreaking date, the developer told Law.com.

The project has also been reconfigured.

It will include 578 affordable residential units. Tenants will also need to be 62 and older and earn 60% of the area median income.

There will also be 250,000 square feet of retail.

Target will anchor the retail with a 50,000 square foot ground floor store. Other tenants will be located on floors six and seven, including Aldi, Ross, Burlington and Five Below.

On floors 2 through 5, there will be a parking garage with about 1,050 spaces.

A construction permit was applied for in November 2020.

Swerdlow Group, SJM Partners, and Alben Duffie are the developers.

 


 

 

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Anonymous
8 months ago

Alot empty lot gone, but the urbancore still has alot even massive empty lots in Brickell. And we have Mana derelict buildings.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Isn’t this considered to be Overtown?

Anonymous
8 months ago

Yes, but for all intents and purposes it’s Downtown Miami. It is east of I-95 and it is a multi-story development so while it is technically on the historical boundary of Overtown, that distinction is blurred with the growth of Miami’s central core.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Overtown is actually and has always been a section of downtown. Way back in the day, someone who lived in the downtown area when ask what part of the city they lived in would say Overtown to specify and pinpoint what part of downtown they live in.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Yes, Overtown definitely has a section of downtown but with the construction of I-95 it complicated things quite a bit. Most of the areas East of I-95 have zoning that is restricted to low rise development which is not congruent with the rest of downtown’s zoning. With the physical boundary of I-95 and the restrictive zoning, the high-rise downtown-type development is relegated to all areas east of I-95. Over time the distinctions of what is the downtown (I.e high rise zone) of Overtown or Park West will blend into Downtown. Neighborhoods ebb and flow and the names change with time as well.

Look at East Little Havana which eclipsed the older neighborhood of Riverside or Little Haiti which was used to be known as Lemon City. I have nothing personally against any of these areas, I just wanted to point out that names sometimes change with time.

Anonymous
8 months ago

*I meant to say most of the areas WEST of I-95 are low rise.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Not to mention even before I-95 was built in the 60s, Overtown was mostly cut off from downtown by railroad tracks and warehouses, the latter of which is Park West today.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Kind of like Harlem to NYC

Anonymous
8 months ago

Yes but Harlem now that it’s fully gentrified and upper class is being split in many neighborhoods names. You have West Harlem, Central Harlem, East Harlem and North Harlem. But then it further splits into Manhattanville, Striver’s Row, Sugar Hill, the Factory District, etc.

Downtown will break more and more into smaller names neighborhoods as it grows.

Anonymous
8 months ago

I didn’t know that Harlem is now an upper-class neighborhood. Last I was in NYC was in the 90s and it surely wasn’t upper-class

Anonymous
8 months ago

A 1 bedroom in Harlem rents at almost $4,000 a month now and sells for around $1M. Lots of young professionals have moved in and lots of new restaurants, coffee shops etc. have opened. Since COVID it’s insane, everyone is moving here in Harlem because rent is still cheaper than the rest of the city. I love Harlem now, it’s nothing like the mess it was in the 90s.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Of you wouldn’t know that because you’re programmed to believe that wherever black people live is automatically low class. It’s called stereotyping.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Harlem isn’t really a black neighborhood though. It’s fully mixed

Anonymous
8 months ago

Harlem is far from upper class.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Name changes are just a natural pattern of time. People ebb and flow into different areas and the neighborhoods change. When changes occur due to gentrification, people clamor at the rich for changing the neighborhood. But as I mentioned above, Little Havana and Little Haiti were established neighborhoods before the new groups came in and made it their home. Although there are many that try, nothing can stop change and time nor should we.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Change is the nature of the game. You can either play the game or watch fro outside and complain about it.

NYC Loves Miami
8 months ago

Harlem is definitely NOT fully gentrified and upper class. I have no idea why you would make such a statement.Yes, some areas are better than back in the days. Did the city just demolish all the public housing projects there? Was they converted into Condos? As Joe Biden would say “C’mon man”.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Harlem is upper class now, I live here. Do you?

NYC Loves Miami
8 months ago

Lived in NYC my entire life. My close childhood friend owns a brownstones and a business in Harlem. Live in denial all you want. Yes, there are SOME nice parts in Harlem, but just b/c some people want to over pay just to have a Manhattan zip code, be my guest. Crazy thing is when I wrote this last night, some 22 year old killed his mom in one of those “upper class” projects just b/c she asked him to get a job. Don’t believe me? Here is the story: https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/nyc-man-fatally-shoots-mom-after-she-asked-him-to-get-a-job-family-says/2850421/

Anonymous
8 months ago

Wow. As people aren’t killed in the projects in Astoria, Williamsburg, Chelsea, the Upper West Side, the Upper East Side, etc. I don’t think you are from NY, I think you are just googling things about NY😂

Anonymous
8 months ago

Housing projects are all over Manhattan, from Chelsea to the Upper West Side. The presence of projects, doesn’t mean the neighborhood is poor, it’s got nothing to do with anything. In NYC you might have a project next to a billion dollar building, that’s just how NYC is.

NYC Loves Miami
8 months ago

I didn’t say that the neighborhood is poor. I just said that in my opinion one wouldn’t consider it upper class. I would feel safe at any time of day in an upper class neighborhood. You really expect me to believe that most people feel safe late at night on the east side of Harlem?

Anonymous
8 months ago

What’s an upper class neighborhood in NYC to you then? Also, Harlem is as big as the UWS, the UES and midtown. Central Harlem is surely upper class. So are many areas of West Harlem. East Harlem is still being improved.

Anonymous
7 months ago

nice parts of harlem are VERY limited, and public housing is surely a detriment to the community there as it is everywhere it exists. used to live in chelsea. later moved to soho partially because of the presence of public housing in the neighborhood. yes there are ultra-lux buildings right next to the projects but there are still very real crime and quality of life problems that emanate from the projects. you want to be as far away from them as possible.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Harlem is hardly in Downtown NYC, unless you consider the entire island as such. Apples to oranges for a very polycentric city like the New York Metropolis.

Anonymous
8 months ago

I don’t think anyone ever said Harlem was downtown NYC, quite the opposite actually. I see reading comprehension isn’t your forte.

Anonymous
8 months ago

I just bought a fully renovated townhouse in Harlem for $6M. I love Harlem. I will be moving in next month, can’t wait!! And yes, it’s more whites than blacks so the comment above is correct. It’s full of Columbia University students also so a ton of rich people live here now.

NYC Loves Miami
8 months ago

Congrats! I’m sure it’s really nice and I hope Harlem continues to progress for the better. Unfortunately, facts and statistics are a stubborn thing. Anyone on TNM can go on Trulia. Look up any property in NYC. Then check the crime map for the 5 boroughs. Interesting enough, there are some areas even in the north Bronx that have more favorable crime statistics. To be clear, I would definitely live in some parts of Harlem, but to say the entire neighborhood is upper class is strange IMHO.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Midtown has higher crime rates than Harlem. Just saying.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Is that really how the boundaries recently misinterpreted. For those of us born raised and rooted its vice versa. Some of yall aint erebody …so to speak!.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Should be much taller

Anonymous
8 months ago

And designed much better.

Optimist
8 months ago

Yes. The mixed-use is good, but the architecture needs help.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Ugly, hideous building. Target is great and all, but let’s face it. If Mana didn’t slum up Flagler Street, it would have been the perfect fit for the old Burdines/Macy’s building.

Casey
8 months ago

This will make people who shop at Midtown Target happy.

Anonymous
8 months ago

Yeah less crowded and more food in the grocery aisles

Anonymous G
8 months ago

I have been a fan of this project since I have heard of it! I hope May 1st ground breaking happens.

Realtalk Reilly
8 months ago

“Tenants will also need to be 62 and older and earn 60% of the area median income.”

I’m assuming that means no more than 60% of the median, not 60% at a minimum lol.

I’m all in favor of having affordable housing, but if you’re going to limit it to old folks, the units should be on the lower floors, not the top.

It’s not easy for those people to navigate the stairs when the hurricane inevitably comes and the power inevitably goes out, or the elevator pits flood and are inoperable even when the power comes back on, like what happened in my building after Irma.