45-Story Una Will Have Three Levels Of Underground Parking

More details of the Brickell’s 135-unit Una tower have been released, as a sales effort began yesterday:

  • Parking will be buried underground, with three levels of subterranean garage (it won’t be robotic). While underground parking is aesthetically superior, it adds time and cost to build. Developers claim they will deliver in Q4 2020
  • Ceiling heights will be 10’8″, above average in Miami
  • Units will have private elevators
  • Glass balcony doors will be “effortless lift and glide”
  • Residents will have access to the Grand Bay Club on Key Biscayne
  • Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture is overseeing both exterior and interior design
  • Brochures have been prepared in six languages: English, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Russian and Turkish

 

 

 

 

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Anonymous
2 years ago

I Thought you can’t dig below a certain depth cause you’ll hit the aquifer.

Anonymous
2 years ago

you can freeze the soil, then pour concrete to keep out the water. costly, but simple to do. city centre did this.

mondocondo
2 years ago

As did Jade Signature. Cheers

Anonymous
2 years ago

At Brickell City Center has it also

Yet Another Anonymous
2 years ago

Downtown Dadeland also has two underground levels, with a sump system.

Anonymous
2 years ago

City Centre tried freezing the soil and failed. They then went to more logical and conventional methods for basement construction in Miami.

Jesus
2 years ago

So how deep can you really go in the city?

Anonymous
2 years ago

Amazing how much a better a building looks if a developer is willing, and would if required, to underground parking. Before you sperg about sea level rise, that’s why upgrading infrastructure is important.

Jesus
2 years ago

A sea wall may do the trick but if the worst case scenario happens, Miami could pretty much be gone.

Anonymous
2 years ago

We drained wetlands to develop Miami. I’m a couple feet of water isn’t going to be the end of the world. When there’s a will, there’s a way, and plenty of money if wealthy people’s livelihoods are at risk. Of course, usually they don’t want to foot the bill until crisis happens.

Anonymous
2 years ago

I’m sure a couple feet of water*

Anonymous
2 years ago

Yep. And most of the East Coast.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Yep, Manhattan was a swamp until it flattened and platted for development during the 1800s, one of the greatest modern engineering feats people take for granted. With its infrastructure aging badly, I’m surprised it doesn’t flood more often like what you saw with Hurricane Sandy.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Until is was* ugh…

William
2 years ago

This is an expensive option and usually not worthwhile. I think the Oceania on Key Biscayne did it. And that was after buying tons of sheet pile, having the individual sheets custom welded and then selling it on the cheap.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Not worthwhile for who? Maybe the developer but certainly not the residents and community who don’t have to stare at an ugly parking podium.

Anonymous
2 years ago

So about 500ft???