Airbnb’s Miami-Dade Revenue Is A Fraction Of The Fontainebleau Hotel

Airbnb released their revenue statistics (and paid resort tax) last month for the first time in Miami-Dade – and one hotel’s revenue exceeds it by far.

In May, revenue for hosts in Miami-Dade was $12 million, resulting in $522,000 resorts taxes paid to the county. Resort tax revenue for the year is expected to hit $6 million in Miami-Dade.

There are 6,800 Airbnb hosts in the county. For the year ending in November, there was $37 million in Airbnb revenue in Miami-Dade

In 2012, the 1,500-room Fontainebleau resort was reported to have $296 million in annual revenue.

 

 

 

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Anonymous
4 years ago

What a silly article. You’re comparing a company that has solely room revenue to a resort with food, beverage, nightclub, parking, commercial poolside cabana, etc, etc, etc revenue? What are you hoping to accomplish with this?

Anonymous
4 years ago

Well, LIV revenues are technically separate, but carry on.

BalHarbour1
4 years ago

As if LIV doesn’t pay rent for that space?

Anonymous
4 years ago

Comparing the Fontainebleau (which has F&B, spas, nightclubs, etc.) in 2012 to AirBNB in May 2017….it’s a little bit of a non-sequitur. I’m glad we’ve found an additional $6M revenue tax stream, let’s hope it goes towards something useful like River Walk.

Anonymous
4 years ago

The fear is that Airbnb can reduce the quality of life for those around these “rentals” especially in a party city like Miami.

Does that happen in practice?

Anonymous
4 years ago

No.. just greedy gov’t officials that want to get a piece of the pie, from AirB&B money.

Anonymous
4 years ago

As some one who lives in a condo near downtown…yes it does. Especially during Ultra weekend and other large concert events.

Anonymous
4 years ago

It was still a mess with Ultra before Airbnb

Anonymous
4 years ago

No. The only places where I can see air-BnB be a problem is in the larger more expensive homes, because they are bigger can accommodate more people and can very easily become a party palace. But mostly because those properties tend to stand out more due to the size and the neighborhood being more upmarket. The other problem I have heard is renters “over booking” the property. i heard the story of one lady who sub-leased her rented home and put up as many as 20-30 people into a small 2000 square foot home in the roads, she was renting on airbnb, for like the price of a bed, like a hostel, $5-$10 a night. Thats a real problem. But those two scenarios are really few and far between. Like I said i only heard of this one particular case. The majority of times, no one really notices the people coming and going. In my opinion air-bnb, like everything else with the anti-development, NIMBY types, is just really about stopping people from benefiting off of their own private property. there are plenty of rules and laws in place to protect quality of life that we dont need any more. This is just another “wedge issue” created by the NIMBY people to rally their base and push for more anti-development, anti-private property, anti-free market agenda.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Well no sh*t. If you looked at the fountainbleaus revenue for the month of May in 2012 it would be about the same. It’s a summer month. Every hosting establishment has low revenue during this time of year. Now compare airbnbs year over year and look at the numbers. #clickbait