Altis Approved In Little Havana With 224 Units

Miami’s Urban Development Review Board voted last month to approve Altis Little Havana.

The eight-story project is proposed for a 1.96-acre property and will include:

  • 224 apartments
  • 351 parking spaces (10% reduction waiver)

There’s also a token amount of ground floor retail.

Altman Development Corporation is the developer. Anillo Toledo Lopez is the architect.

 

 

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Anonymous
2 years ago

I like how they hid the parking by lining both the front and back of the building with units.

Grovite
2 years ago

One less steeple in the Miami Skyline… Unfortunate that the Church and the school building next door aren’t being preserved and incorporated into the site plan. I am fond of the school building east of the church. Nice structure.

Anony
2 years ago

Apparently not enough Presbyterians to save the church.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Weird, I’ve never seen that church’s steeple in Miami’s skyline?

Anonymous
2 years ago

Look up once and a while. Trinity Cathedral in Edgewater is beautiful, but might be ruined by a messy architectural monstrosity proposed next door.

Anonymous
2 years ago

It can’t be that noticeable in the skyline if something only stories tall can block it.

Anonymous
2 years ago

The are about 2000 people that praise God on that building every Sunday that thanks to the owner (the other pastor), the developers and the board are staying without a santuary to worship God.

Anonymous
2 years ago

It’s Shenandoah, not Little Havana to the residents who actually live here, old and new. Little Havana is north of 8th Street, touristy Calle Ocho being its southern boundary. The heart is Flagler Street, through Riverside (Heights) and Riverview.

Anonymous
2 years ago

For sure that is Little Havana. The address is SW 8th St. . Flagler might be the middle geographically, but the heart of Little Havana is Calle Ocho. Ever been to the Calle Ocho block party?

Anonymous
2 years ago

Calle Ocho is used for Little Havana events, but it’s still around the border. If it was that big, it wouldn’t be little at all.

Anony
2 years ago

Interesting exchange. Looks like demographics are shifting.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Would like to see some kind of legislation in Shenandoah/Little Havana that promotes smaller, fine-grain development and discourages this kind of monstrosity. This project and InTown are out of scale compared to the rest of the neighborhood.
It would be nice to have this more historic part of Miami keep its smaller, walkable character and have more 6-12 unit apartment buildings (which would be exempt from providing parking on-site) rather than large, parking garage podium buildings.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Is a seven story building for God sake!!!
What is the scale ratio use in urban planning?
That is the same lame excuse Elvis Cruz and his Morningside gang used to kill the Upper East Side Redevelopment plans.

Anonymous
2 years ago

“This project and InTown are out of scale compared to the rest of the neighborhood.”

This person can’t help him/herself, because he/she exist in the year 2018 but his/her mind thinks 1950s.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Once again, idiot Miami mentality goes straight to height (because that is all that the commenters here are obsessed with).
The complaint isn’t about the height, rather the extremely large linear massing that is unappealing. 6-8 story buildings in Europe are beautiful because the massing is constantly broken up by division of buildings and smaller blocks. This is the opposite.
My main point: The parking exemption was one smart thing this city has done. Little Havana is one area where almost the entire neighborhood is exempt. I would love to see developers get more creative and do something different than a large podium building. The new townhouses on 8th Ave and NW 1st are a great example.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Once again, idiot complainer’s mentality goes straight to talking about whats “out of scale” in a neighborhood that’s full BS that was built at a time when most of the city was used only as a second home for northerners. Face it, your mentality is stuck in the 1950s.

Anonymous
2 years ago

You better brush up on history, because that’s isn’t the case.

Anonymous
2 years ago

that wasn’t*

aceraroja
2 years ago

“Most of the city was used as a second home for northerners” hahahhaah no.

aceraroja
2 years ago

They’ll never understand what people have against ugly uninspired tired 2004-looking wad with “token amounts” of retail (another bank or cvs), phoned-in copy-pasted layouts in which every room is just a little too small for actual furniture, placement of interior walls and doors leave no place to arrange a room. All they care about is that another wad of concrete has been dumped in Miami to pump up the raw population numbers to which — for some reason I can’t fathom — they have tied their egos.

“This isn’t Europe” You tell em! We’re not good enough for human-scaled design that accounts for pedestrian interaction! We’re AMERICANS and don’t give a fuck if we all live in storage units surrounded by traffic jams.

Anony
2 years ago

It’s actually 8 stories, and this isn’t Europe. There’s plenty of buildings this size on 8th st.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Absolutely correct.

Anonymous
2 years ago

It doesn’t matter what we are. It still doesn’t change the fact it’s a giant block with no architecture, and ugly disorderly openings at the bottom few floors at the sides. Take note from Coral Gables, architecture and design which can fit here well if you actually consider all the beautiful old Mediterranean Revival homes and Mission Revival apartment houses around the neighborhood.

Anonymous
2 years ago

You prefer the same type of architecture that reminds you of a bygone era.

Out with the old, in with the new.

Anonymous
2 years ago

This isn’t new or groundbreaking at all. This is crap, plain and simple.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Well in that case, it should fit right in with all the other crap we see in Little Havana.

Anonymous
2 years ago

So sad to see a historic church torn down for yet another generic apartment building that looks identical to others in the are and despite there being plenty of empty lots in the area. They could have at the very least retained the church and built above it ala 1836 Biscayne.

Anony
2 years ago

Interesting compromise design for a dual-zoned site.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Sooo let me guess affordable apartments starting at $2000 for a 100 sq ft closet in the mechanical room??

Anonymous
2 years ago

Horrible design.
No creativity
Scale is fine.
It just doesn’t read Little Havana.
Horrible!

Anony
2 years ago

Put a rooster on top?

Anonymous
2 years ago

…. with old Cuban men sitting around a domino table.

Anonymous
2 years ago

What a sin to tear down a historical church,,,many that grew up in that church are saddened,,,all this for some apartments. You need a church more then you need apartments.

Anonymous
2 years ago

It’ll be a shame to see the old Shenandoah Presbyterian Church/Ministerio Manases destroyed. Maybe the developer could incorporate the spire into the new building?

Anonymous
2 years ago

Is that a jail on the second and third floor of the west side? It could be solid infill without the “missing teeth.”