Archbishop Curley-Notre Dame High School For Sale, Up To 5 Million Square Feet Can Be Built

The Archdiocese of Miami has listed the Archbishop Curley-Notre Dame High School for sale.

Due to the large size of the site, buyers will be able to qualify for a Special Area Plan under the Miami 21 zoning code, with the potential to build up to 5 million square feet.

Brokers say that zoning allows for up to 28 stories, which would be much taller than the surrounding neighborhood.

Avison Young selected to sell legacy site in Miami offering 5 million SF of mixed-use development potential

The 15.56-acre development-primed property located adjacent to famed Design District will provide needed “live-work-play” urban environment

Miami, FL — Avison Young’s Florida Capital Markets Group along with Bezold Realty have been exclusively tapped to market and sell a ±15.56-acre development site with potential to develop approximately 5 million square feet of office, residential, retail, and hospitality product located at 4949 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami, Fla. The land parcel represents a rare opportunity to own an iconic site that has been held by the Archdiocese of Miami as the former home to the Archbishop Curley-Notre Dame High School. Located just outside of the internationally-renowned, high-end shopping mecca of the Miami Design District, the site will serve the pent-up demand fueled by office tenants and residents choosing to live, work, and play in an urban environment.

Avison Young Principals David Duckworth, John K. Crotty, CCIM, and Michael T. Fay will lead the marketing and disposition of the property on behalf of the seller. “Although tremendous attention has been driven by the surrounding development in Wynwood and Design District, the area still remains in the early stages of a dynamic transformation,” said Duckworth. “The need for a true mixed-use development is of high demand, and as such, we are confident this distinctive property will garner incredible interest.”

The size of the site qualifies it for a Special Area Plan (SAP) which can provide the opportunity to achieve T6-12 zoning and up to 28 stories of vertical construction with community benefit and transit bonuses. This development will create phenomenal bay and ocean views as well as direct access to 54th Street, nearby restaurants, Publix, Morningside Park, and the Eastside Ridge Development. Seeking to attract more planned and auspicious development, Miami has approved and provided entitlements for at least ten projects from the Miami River going north since this relatively new zoning tool was implemented.

“The property is the last remaining development site of this size in Greater Downtown Miami, adding to the site’s unique potential,” said Crotty. “This asset is truly a gem that presents developers with a one-of-a-kind opportunity to create one of the most iconic mixed-use projects in the Miami CBD, rivaling that of Brickell City Centre.”

Situated just west of Biscayne Boulevard, a principal roadway with direct access to I-95 and I-195, 4949 NE 2nd Avenue is minutes from the growing large-scale urban development of Midtown Miami and the burgeoning Wynwood Art District. Miami’s densest and fastest growing neighborhoods of Brickell and Downtown are located just south of Midtown.

Fay, who leads Avison Young’s Florida Capital Markets Group which has sold more than $500 million worth of real estate to date in 2017, added: “Miami-Dade County’s local economy continues to enjoy growth in areas such as tourism and retail sales driven largely by the live-work-play environment found in many urban pockets throughout the county, as explained in recent Avison Young market reports. Aligned with this trend has been Miami making way for massive mixed-use projects making the Archdiocese site a timely investment.”

 

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LongMIA
4 years ago

Amazon City.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Amazon will never happen here – little usable mass transit.

Dave
4 years ago

If the tri-rail coastal line ever got built, someone could buy this and the giant apartment complex next door and build their own mini-city complete with a transit stop.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Great location, but mass transit is sorely needed for this area. Local roads are already past their maximum capacity.

City Commissioner
4 years ago

28-Stories until the Morning-Side Legal team gets involved, than is more like 14-Stories.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Too bad we are losing Curley High School.. lots of history and excellent graduates.. end of an era.

mondocondo
4 years ago

The sites current zoning permits a height of between 2 to 5 stories, not 28. Hoped for rezoning is 28. Cheers

Marc306
4 years ago

Why does everything need to be about vertical development? Why can’t a smart developer hire a solid urban planner to design a compact, walkable, mixed-use neighborhood. Keep everything 4-6 stories but a dense neighborhood like a European city. Get people on the streets rather than in elevators

Anonymous
4 years ago

Why do you want every city in the USA to look like some European city?

Anonymous
4 years ago

Well, there isn’t a catchall characteristic for European cities, because a lot of them have high-rise centers and development, too. What he’s referring to is prewar pedestrian-oriented development focusing on the bottom up (interactive use at street level, and residential and offices above) instead of top-down (residential and offices in the sky with a dead parking garage at street level). Of course, you find it prevalent in Europe, but also Japan and the upper east coast of the United States. Even prewar skyscrapers in NYC and Chicago manage to mediate between human scale and height.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Most of these european and japanese cities along with NYC and Chicago beat Miami by 2, 3, 4 hundred and even more years in age. Miami has a lot of catching up to do compared to these places, so lets see where these developers are taking the city and people should not worry about being or looking like europe or japan.

Anonymous
4 years ago

So true, but the main idea is to have good amenities within a pleasant walking distance.

Anonymous
3 years ago

In other words….any community that was developed before the invention of the elevator and air conditioning.

I tell you…the cave dwellers REALLY had it made!
Their neighborhoods were extraordinarily walkable, very meal was farm to table, people didn’t love their cars, the street art on the cave walls really connected with people, and the hipster beards were award winning.

mondocondo
4 years ago

It’s called the invention of the elevator, then the air conditioner, then modern steel frame construction that allowed the skyscraper to develop. These designs are much more efficient for land and resource use, and have permitted the growth of urban density with generally affordable housing. The key to making these towers appealing is how they are integrated into the neighborhood at ground level, which hasn’t been too thrilling in Miami with the massive parking podiums crowding the sidewalks. Miami 21 addressed this to some extent, but grandfathered projects like Flatiron still persists. These towers play a valuable role in urban design since without them population growth just creates massive urban sprawl, a la many western US cities. What you fail to mention is that the low-rise core housing in many of these charming European cities is among the most expensive in the world. Cheers

Anonymous
4 years ago

Height has nothing to do with affordable housing, especially where it’s the opposite for views, etc. It’s more about sprawl discouraging the incentive of building vertical for outward affordable housing, compared to urban growth boundaries which usually raise costs.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Height has everything to do with affordable housing where land is not cheap. Cheers

Anonymous
3 years ago

You got it man.
I should have read this post before I lost faith in humanity and posted my caveman post. Thank goodness that at least one in 50 people get it.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Isn’t the neighborhood complex next door also for sale? If so I see a lot of potential in this area in the coming years. 28 stories is a game changer for that area. Too bad no one currently in that area will be able to afford to stay…

Very limited access
4 years ago

No access except on NE 2nd Avenue. The current zoning is for a school, right? This site and the existing two story Design Place apartments just north are VERY traffic challenged. Who wants to get stuck in gridlock?

Anonymous
3 years ago

Sad to see Curley/NDA close but to paraphrase an old saying; money talks,Catholic education walks.

Anonymous
4 years ago

This area sucks! And it’s going to continue to suck for the next 25 years.

Anonymous
4 years ago

It’s right between the Design and MiMo districts, and an affluent cluster of single-family neighborhoods of Buena Vista, Bay Point, and Morningside. Lemon City is a work in progress. I’d love you hear what constitutes your definition of what doesn’t suck.

Anonymous
4 years ago

“This area sucks! And it’s going to continue to suck for the next 25 years.”

Gee, I wonder if some female ever said about you “he sucks! And he’s going to continue to suck for the next 25 years.”