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Architectural Wonderland: Design District Expansion Now Open

Architectural Wonderland: Design District Expansion Now Open

A major expansion of Miami’s Design District is now open, just in time for Art Basel.

With the latest expansion, the district is essentially doubling in size.

By the end of 2018, there will be a total of 120 shops and 15 eateries, and a hotel is expected to be announced soon.

Sales and foot traffic have grown 50 percent every month since June, with the exception of September due to Hurricane Irma, Craig Robins told The Real Deal.

One of the most anticipated additions to the neighborhood is the Institute of Contemporary Art museum, which celebrated opening this weekend.

Dacra, LVMH’s L Real Estate, General Growth Properties and Ashkenazy Acquisition Corp are the major investors in the Design District project.

 

Paradise Plaza which will feature four Joel Robuchon restaurants, along with Brad Kilgore’s Ember and Kaido:

Bark-covered Christian Loboutin:

Rag & Bone:

Museum Garage under construction.  It will feature five different facades:

Tesla showroom opening soon:

ABC Kitchen by Michelin-starred chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten:

ICA Miami museum:

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30 Comments on "Architectural Wonderland: Design District Expansion Now Open"

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marc
marc

I appreciate the use of actual shade trees. I hope the Worldcenter area follows suit.

Anonymous
Anonymous

True.. those shade tree along sidewalks add to the elegance. The lighting is top notch.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Damn… Absolutely beautiful… I so hope this becomes hugely successful….

Anonymous
Anonymous

Congratulations MDD!!! just in time for all the winter activities.

Curio
Curio

The DD is becoming a streetscape like no other.

Oscar
Oscar

Love what he’s done in creating that area but I’m concerned about the retail mix and viability. A lot of his tenants have come from his partnership with LVMH which was a genius move to make them stakeholders in the district’s success but I’m not sure that success is forthcoming. Haven’t really seen the foot traffic go up and I’m not sure that his strategy of targeting almost exclusively high-end luxury retailers and international tourists will payoff longterm. The 50% year-over-year growth in sales and foot traffic is nothing more than a marketing blurb unless he’s citing same-store growth which I doubt he is. If you increase your retail space by 100% and sales/foot-traffic goes up by only 50%, that’s not really a sign of growth, is it? Hope I’m wrong. The area is stunning architecturally and deserves to flourish.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Just give it time to establish more restaurants bars cafes hotel and some residential … It will morph into the success that mdd deserves…. These retailers are quite smart and knew it would be a difficult revenue environment for the first few years … Miami enjoys international recognition… Particularly from wealthy foreigners …the homes around the district are already enjoying double digit increases … This WILL be the envy of other high end shopping districts in this country within a few short years…

Simon
Simon

It’s a relatively low rent area with brands selling high margin products. Same reason you see a lot of these high end stores at airport – cheap rent and even low volumes generate the profits needed to keep the store running.

defamed2
defamed2

Completely wrong assertion about airports. Duty free retail has its own economics. And no, leases are not cheap or easy to negotiate at airports.

Oscar
Oscar

Rent at airports is definitely not cheap.

Alfonso
Alfonso

Outstanding Real Estate, every store is a unique piece of architecture, all types of finishes, lighting, fixtures, colors, textures etc… a real joy to have such amazing properties within our city…

Anonymous
Anonymous

You can’t compare this with Rodeo Drive as it’s been around a lot longer and is complete. MDD isn’t complete but it’s getting there an I can bet more people go there now than ever before. Foot traffic does not define MDD’S success as it’s marketed toward those who can afford it an those people you don’t see there more than likely can’t. Trust they are making money but those who don’t have a deep pocket don’t see a reason to go down there other than to window shop. Once it’s done and you have more to do, see and eat then you will see more foot traffic.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“Sales and foot traffic have grown 50 percent every month since June…” That doesn’t sound right.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I really appreciate what MDD is doing, but it’s relatively a ghost town every time I’m there.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The Wolfsonian could use an annex in this neighborhood if you ask me.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Been there, seen it grow to what it is today and can’t wait until it’s completely finish. I love it.

Yohan Perez
Yohan Perez

How about a couple of nightclubs?

Anonymous
Anonymous

With the type of retail and restaurants and proximity to a very NIMBY neighborhood to the north, not likely.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“Sales and foot traffic have grown 50 percent every month since June” but photos show between 0 and about 5 people

Anonymous
Anonymous

Those pics taken after hours..

Anonymous
Anonymous

“Architectural wonderland?” I must be so uncultured to find most of it quite boorish. It’s literally a mall with the roof taken off and streets running though it. Everything is low-rise and clad in what you expect a storefront to look like under a roof.

Anonymous
Anonymous

To qualify low-rise as a negative factor in this architectural context is brutish.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Not really. A tower with retail at the bottom in this style would look better, like something on Fifth Avenue, but here it looks quite odd. For low-rises, Rodeo Drive does it better.

Curio
Curio

Somehow you make no sense

FromtheATL
FromtheATL

Boorish, as in coarse and ill-mannered? Are you certain that is the word you’re looking for because it seems to be misused in this context? Also, some people just live to kvetch. When BCC is touted as a nexus and catalyst for the neighborhood it serves, some dismiss it as nothing more than a mall with seemingly no value other than the promotion of consumerism. MDD, on the other hand, does away with the enclosed and climate controlled environment/concept and, instead, goes for a more traditional urban layout that rises from the neighborhood and (beautifully, I may add) rather than closing itself up from it and some dismiss it as a mall without a roof with streets running through it. You just simply can’t win. I’m certain that when World Center debuts, these same naysayers will find some other hateful pretext to mock and dismiss it rather than embrace the positive growth and the rebirth of once derelict and blighted neighborhoods. How does one get to be so darn negative?

Anonymous
Anonymous

They get so negative because they have “Boorish” life!

Anonymous
Anonymous

FYI, I never dismissed BCC for those reasons. I simply believe anybody who goes with the claim these artsy-fartsy boxes are some “architectural wonderland” is simply misguided. It should have been more mixed-use with residential, hotel, and office space in a variety of solid architectural styles.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You lost me at artsy fartsy

Anonymous
Anonymous

This place needs a Bass Pro Shops and a Popeye’s Fried Chicken.

Anonymous
Anonymous

This will rival rodeo drive when its completed even with Bal Harbour’s radius restrictions sucking the life out of high fashion retail in Miami with their limited square footage small box stores. This has always been one of my favorite shopping areas in Miami since before the Y3 store moved.