Board Approves Plans For Megacenter Brickell, Mixed-Use Project Wrapped In Changeable Art

Yesterday, the Urban Development Review Board approved plans for Megacenter Brickell.

The first tower features a mixed-use mini-storage facility wrapped in changeable art with basement parking, street level retail, 4 levels of office space, and rooftop terrace (12 floors total). There will also be an 8-floor residential building with a 9th floor rooftop amenities deck and ground-level retail space.

 

CELEBRATED FIRM BORGES + ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS RECEIVES DESIGN APPROVAL FOR PROPOSED MIXED-USE ‘MEGACENTER’ PROJECT IN BRICKELL
Developed by Chilean-based Red Megacentro, the nearly 200,000 square foot space will feature basement parking, retail, residential, and office space directly off Calle Ocho & I-95

Miami, FL (June 15, 2016) – Today, Borges + Associates Architects, led by founder and principal Reinaldo Borges, received Urban Design Review Board (UDRB) approval of their proposed plans for the new Megacenter project.

The 12-story mixed-use development at 420 SW 7th Street and 427 SW 8th Street in Brickell (just west of I-95) was strategically designed by Borges + Associates to house six levels of mini-storage along with 111 basement parking spots, street level commercial space, and topped off with four levels of boutique office space boasting 360-degree views of the Downtown and Brickell skyline with rooftop terrace for tenants. The total height of this tower is 148 feet.

The project also includes a multi-family, eight-story residential tower fronting Calle Ocho with rooftop amenities on the 9th floor including 57 multi-family units and ground level specialty retail with a height of 111 feet, making it a pedestrian friendly project for the emerging neighborhood.

“The Megacenter project is vital in that it represents the future of the surrounding neighborhood with a visionary approach to the integration of art which welcomes you from the I-95 off ramp into the emerging mixed-use, world-class Brickell neighborhood,” says Borges. According to Borges, “The UDRB board approved the project with recognition to the complexity of the project in its mixed use program and a well resolved infill project considering the complexity of the context and site configuration. They noted they liked the artfulness of the project and the iconic architecture that it brings to the neighborhood, West of I-95 and acting as a gateway site into Brickell and Little Havana.”
While the artwork will be replaced periodically on the building’s main facades, it will celebrate the evolution of Miami’s art scene. The art being shown in these conceptual images represents the work of several artists, while the main image being shown is the work of ABSTRACT who operates out of Miami and works internationally. No official commitment has been made with any artist at this time but Borges says, “Megacenter U.S. will be working closely with select artists to make this a very special and artful building that celebrates the art culture that Miami is nurturing.”

Staying true to Borges + Associates’ strident focus on sustainable building practices, Megacenter will be LEED certified and will enhance the walkability of the neighborhood utilizing a specialized approach to urban design. The project also includes future-resilient strategies to further enhance its long-term performance and value.

Megacenter U.S. was founded in 2012 in partnership with Chilean-based Red Megacentro to develop its business model in the United States, under the guidance of developers Patricio Ureta and Pablo Wichmann. Since 2013, Ureta and Wichmann have been responsible for the acquisition and development of several projects throughout Miami with an expected total area over 1,000,000 sqf at completion by the end of 2017. The company offers office, warehouse and self-storage space in Chile, Peru and Miami and is #1 in the Chilean self-storage market with 22% GLA market share.

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Anonymous

im actually looking forward to this project…..looks very nice and will jumpstart more infill development in this area west of 95.

Plolo

It should be call “Megacenter Little Havna”.

Really???

Agreed. In the article on the real deal they also try to call the area the Roads, lol. Its not in Brickell or the Roads. I guess you have to attach to the other neighborhoods to get the deal done.

Rod

That neighborhood is called Riverside.

Anonymous

It’s on the edge of Little “Havna” facing Brickell, so the current moniker is somewhat appropriate. The most logical in a technical sense would be “Southside” or “Riverside.” Development in the Lower East Side of Manhattan aren’t named after “Little Italy” and “Chinatown” which replaced it, so why use a classification not reflective to flux? Also, the “golden exiles” called a small stretch businesses along Flagler Street in Riverside and Riverview “La Sagusera.” It was overzealous politicians and the later business leaders who proposed changing it all to “Little Havana,” and were ironically chided following the “Latin Quarter” proposal to reflect the multinational Hispanic character sometime in the 80s. It’s a shame, because there were also design guidelines which wouldn’t have permitted for this eyesore and any suburban format establishments.

Anonymous

changeable art, eh? ultimately, a euphemism for “changeable advertising?”

Marc305

I am all for this project, I just hope that the “art” will not be like the 2nd grade crayon “color between the lines” crap that is being painted on right now at SLS.
…. At least this art will be changeable and not permanent.

Anonymous

It seems the Little Havana area is experiencing a redevelopment boom, with storage facilities for Brickellites… What a waste of valuable land, which will continue to appreciate for more substantial development. Please keep storage facilities and ugly architecture out of the neighborhood. That’s what Doral is for!

It’s also pretty sad when the developer got a thirty percent parking reduction waiver, but the building’s massing from the storage facility looks uglier than most towers with clunky parking pedestals.

FH

Can we please not call this Brickell..it’s ways off Brickell and it only looks like a desperate and deceptive attempt to make this a desirable project…Also, Megacenter…really? What a horrendous and unbefitting name…

Anonymous

Megacenter is the name of the development company, “Red Megacentro” who has developed several in Chile, this is the first one here.