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Brightline Ridership Numbers Made Public For First Time

Brightline Ridership Numbers Made Public For First Time

Brightline released ridership details to investors last week, their first such report.

Ridership “exceeded management’s expectations” during the first quarter of 2018, the company said in the briefing.

In total, the company generated ticket revenue of $663,667 and carried 74,780 total passengers from January through March 2018, when only the Fort Lauderdale to West Palm Beach leg was open and promotional pricing was offered. Operating expense during that time was $28.8 million.

Ridership grew an average of 35% each month during the quarter.

Almost half of riders are choosing the first class car. Around 59% of revenue is being generated in the premium “select” cabin while 46% of tickets sold are in the select cabin.

The company told investors they have now obtained necessary approvals to extend the network to Orlando and are evaluating plans to commence construction. They also intend to participate in an RFP to further extend the network to Tampa.

Investors appeared to cheer the news, with company bonds trading near 104 yesterday, near their high since being issued in December.

 

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Anonymous
Anonymous

Great news… and the exciting transformation we are witnessing in downtown is only going to increase exponentially with Brightline.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Once Orlando is added numbers will really increase.

Anonymous
Anonymous

If the operating expenses stay where they are with the revenues this report shows, they are bound for a total failure

Anonymous
Anonymous

Is there a link to this report? The numbers make no sense. We are talking a monumental operating deficit in the making or there is something majorly wrong.

Anonymous
Anonymous

What a disaster! It takes Brightline 3 months to generate $660k in revenue?? And with huge expenses. Holy crap! This business sucks! When’s the fire sale??

Oscar
Oscar

^ clearly a business genius

Anonymous
Anonymous

^ Some people gotta be azzholes despite how dumb they are

Oscar
Oscar

harsh words from Anonymous (1 of 1,000)

Anonymous
Anonymous

I love Brightline and I have ridden a couple of times to both Ft Lauderdale and West Palm Beach. I rode Select service each time. It was a very nice trip and the waiting rooms were comfortable and even had chargers built in to the furniture. The snacks on select service are no big deal and would be about $3 at any convenience store. Having said that, I will probably go back to Tri-Rail, especially next time I go to West Palm Beach. Both trains let me off downtown, albeit Brightline is much closer to where most people want to go and with Tri-Rail you can either walk or take a 5 minute Trolley Ride. $50 for Brightline Select VS $11 for Tri-Rail. It was fun but I don’t see it being worth the extra $. At least the Brightline Ft Lauderdale trip is a time saver since if you take Tri-Rail you need to take a trolley or bus to get downtown but even then, if you aren’t in a hurry and don’t mind riding public transportation there is a significant price difference..

Anonymous
Anonymous

how long till its subsidized?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Only $660k in revenues in 3 months? Isn’t anyone else astonished by this? This is EXTREMELLY low. My friend has a call center with 10 employees and he does $500k in revenues every quarter. My other friend has a transport company with only 3 trucks and that’s also what he makes in revenues quarterly. My partner at work (he is more senior than me) makes MORE than that in revenues every quarter (banker) I could go on… this is ridiculously low. They must be missing a few 0’s or it’s the shittiest business ever.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I’m sure the people at Brightline know Moore about running a rail business than you, but it’s glad to know you have wealthy friends

Anonymous
Anonymous

Everyone predicted that they would loose money…except for the Brightline folks, they thought it’d be a huge success. It’s only a matter of time before they fail and the newly expanded rights to run more trains will shift to pushing more noisy, and more profitable, cargo trains up an down the line.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well that’s the thing..my friends are not that wealthy. We’re talking revenues, not earnings. I doubt the rail business has incredible margins. It makes me think the whole rail thing is just a decoy to do prime real estate. The top line of their income statement is horrible.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Who said ticket revenue is to be their primary source of income? In Japan many private railway companies make most of their revenue operating retail locations at their stations. Brightline clearly has a similar model.

Anonymous
Anonymous

If anyone would ever just go ride the train for a day they would see all those great numbers of ridership where a tremendous fake ….that train runs empty or near empty most of the time

Anonymous
Anonymous

Kicking butt, $28m in expenses against $660k in revenues, great ROI

Anonymous
Anonymous

They are clearly dumping the entire cost of the project in a lump sum against a partially operational first quarter – were you expecting a full return already?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Cant wait for the Orlando route to open!! Would be amazing if one day it could connect with other larger hubs.. Atlanta, DC.. NY.. maybe one day

Anonymous
Anonymous

That plan it in works

Anonymous
Anonymous

People that take train are smart and save themselves headaches driving 95 !

mondocondo
mondocondo

Looks like they’ll be relying on the Orlando leg to bail out the concept. Cheers

Anonymous
Anonymous

It needs stops between ft lauderdale and miami for example design district

Anonymous
Anonymous

I know the big draw is high speed with only 3 stops. But when I went to Miami n saw the train speed by FLL airport I said, OMG. Are u serious. This MUST be a future stop, somehow.

Jesus
Jesus

And this is why we need to support public transit even more. Costs are always going to be higher unless we become as dense as Hong Kong and honestly, who wants that?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Actually, I do.
Not having to drive is a blessing!!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

They’re even losing money in hong kong and the city is subsiding it there. When I went there I was shocked at how low the prices for the subway were.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Losing money? What have you been smoking in HK?
“one-third of the rail giant’s HK$55.44 billion in revenue last year came from its local transport operations”

chago
chago

I’m sure pretty much all public transit systems are unprofitable. We need to rethink how we quantify profits/value of public transit. Profits go beyond revenue generated by fares, transit generates business, productivity, and growth which are harder to quantify. Also keep in mind the road/highway system is not profitable to operate either… but it is necessary for a city to function.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You can find one of Hong Kong’s most profitable businesses about 30 meters below the earth’s surface.
The city’s subway is the face of the Mass Transit Railway Corporation (MTR) — a publicly traded company that pulled in $5.2 billion in revenue last year. With a $2 billion annual profit

Anonymous
Anonymous

Roads are unprofitable as well. If revenue is gas/use taxes, then they lose money. they are subsidized by general funds.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I would love Hong Kong density.

Anonymous
Anonymous

No you wouldn’t

Anonymous
Anonymous

Miami is a huge suburban plantain plantation.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Sure, lets have a dozen more Hong Kong’s, our natural resources are infinite.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I don’t want Hong Kong density either, but denser cities use fewer natural resources and have a lower carbon footprint so you should consider a different argument.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Water is good for you, too much of it can kill you. Argument against over population stands.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The problem is not our lack of resources. The problem is how mankind treats this earth. Crapping on our oceans and poisoning the very air we breathe does nothing but trigger shortages of everything the way we are now witnessing.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Shortages? Haven’t heard of any any shortages in Hong Kong or New York.
The blithering Erlich’s of this world seem to ignore that the most populated places have the most abundance.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Uh yeah, good observation, seven billion people on this earth and they all live in New York City and Hong Kong.

Anonymous
Anonymous

That’s true but density is better than urban sprawl for Gaia.

Anonymous
Anonymous

That’s one of the big problems here in the USA, we’ve been sold on the “three bedroom home sitting on half an acre” dream.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Brightline is not public transit

Anonymous
Anonymous

Brightline is part of the future of Miami. We are finally developing a downtown that will continue to grow. Do you honestly think Brightline didn’t do their homework before they spent over $1billion. Don’t you see the article says it exceeded management expectations? So they expected it to not do as well as it did out the gate. That means it’s nothing to worry about it’s doing well. An you would have to be stupid to think they expected to make a fortune off of Brightline. They have hotel, residential, retail and office space they have 2 more towers that haven’t broke ground yet. I’m sure they are going to build more mix use buildings around their stations in the future. Brightline is just a cover up for what they really had a plan for all along so trust me they are going to be just fine.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Very awesome and smooth ride. Waiting for brightline to head to Orlando.

Anonymous
Anonymous

JetBlue is probably the last major carrier to start out new, about 15 years ago. Do you honestly think that 3 months after they started up they were making money? Think of all the planes they had to lease, the employees to pay, the airport fees. Come on….Brightline is just getting started. When Orlando opens, it’s going to be a real game changer. And yes…Tri Rail is cheaper. I’d be willing to bet that Tri Rail is seeing an increase in business due to Brightline calling attention to train service here in South Florida.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You guys are talking like you know what your talking about. For one operating expenses who knows exactly what that means? You guys think that means the trains going back an fourth? That could mean everything as in payroll, maintenance, improvements to track etc. If they really thought those numbers were bad don’t you think the investors would be ready to bail? 3 months 20 minute ride almost $1million just off tickets. We are not talking about everything else they made money off just ticket sales. Not even including Miami ticket sales according to the article. In time the operating cost will go down and revenue will go up because more and more people will ride it. Now think about when they expand an these trains are running around the clock an all of Brightline is finished. Once MWC an all of downtown is done that train will be packed! The operation cost goes down an total revenue will go from $1million in 3 months to $20million or more easy! Just be patience people it’s only been 3 months you can’t expect redicoulous numbers just yet it will take time.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yes, like a couple decades?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Brightline isn’t necessarily designed to generate revenue itself… FEC will make money due to the increased property values of the land around the stations… land which they own and are actively developing.

Anonymous
Anonymous

So about 34 people a train .

Anonymous
Anonymous

Brightline is nowhere near finished yet. a lot of people who comment on this site are very impatient.

Anonymous
Anonymous

just the facts

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well, if the operating costs were that high and the revenue that low do you really think that operation to Miami will make that much difference?
This is a formula for disaster if you asked me. Unless the Tri Rail downtowns are going to grow that much which I don’t think so. This area is not built for mass transit. The only solution is stop expanding into the Everglades and put a moratorium. But then again, it’s already too late. Even if they stopped expanding, the Tri County area is the size of a country with no density. Cities thrive in urban centers where there is density. I mean, people the population of downtown Miami is a mere 50,000 and that’s including from Brickell all the way to the Design District. An area half the size of Paris

Anonymous
Anonymous

Brightline is aware of their low revenue im sure. They are also aware of the density not being at its peak in current form right now. Truthfully, there is a lot of things affecting our “lack of density” , foreign ownership in the downtown core is too high. This group of people is too transient and only end up living here half the year if that. What we need is for numbers to stabilize, jobs that offer more that $10/ hour, and REAL BUSINESS GROWTH in the dowtown/brickell core. There just isn’t enough of it now but I don’t think that will be the case for too long. Downtown Miami will see its growth, it just takes more time. More and more businesses are moving to FLA for tax purposes among other reasons. It will get better we just have to be patient.

Anonymous
Anonymous

That’s what a lot people who come on this site don’t have, “patience.” That anonymous above seems to not realize that if the Tri-county area got together and called this a metro area, even though some call it that anyway, it is the eighth largest metro area in the USA. But this guy wrote “the Tri County area is the size of a country with no density. What? Florida is the third most populated state in the nation with half the population of California but Florida’s land size is less than half of California.

This guy talks but has no real analytical skills.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Population and Population density are two completely different things. X Miami, the future 45 Block development in Overtown, The new Melo Group rental towers in the Art and Entertainment district, will definitely increase Downtown’s population density.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Funny, I thought the population in an area indicated what the density is in said area… oh well, what do I know.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Population density is the population per Sq Mile (Km)
City of Miami population 407500 people
City of Miami population density is 11,135.9 people per square mile

Anonymous
Anonymous

False numbers.