Census: Miami-Dade Is Growing Much Faster This Decade Than Last

Miami-Dade is adding more new residents this decade than in previous decades, an analysis of Census data by the state of Florida shows.

The county is already the most populous in Florida, with 13.3% of the state’s residents.

With just eight years counted in this decade, Miami-Dade already added more residents than in 2000-2010.

This decade, Miami-Dade will also surpass the boom growth years of the 80s and 90s in terms of absolute growth (but not percentage growth) should current trends continue.

The growth rate by decade was:

  • 2010-2018 – 282,865 new residents (with two years remaining in the decade)
  • 2000-2010 – 242,678 new residents
  • 1990-2000 – 316,585 new residents
  • 1980-1990 – 311,685 new residents

The growth means added population density. As of 2018, there are 1,464 persons per square mile – a 26% increase in density since 2000, and more than triple the density of the rest of the state.

Also booming in Miami – taxes. Per-capita tax revenue generated in Miami-Dade is more than double what is generated on average in the rest of Florida, the analysis shows.

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Anonymous
1 year ago

Ok great now invest those funds into public transportation and alleviate the congestion now is the time!!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Perfect opportunity to add more transit and bicycle facilities. The City/County does not have any more room for highways or streets. One cannot widen roads out of this mess. We need to take cars off the roads, not make room for more.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Triple decker every highway is their solution…

Anonymous
1 year ago

AMEN! ??

Anonymous
1 year ago

And is the city addressing this growth how? By increasing and improving public transportation would be a nice start. Let’s make the Metromover move Miami 24/7 and anywhere and with lots lots lots more cars and locations, in the city and to the beach. Let’s just please stay away from buses, that’s not a mean of transportation anyone wants to use.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Metro used the 1/2 ¢ sales tax money for operations instead of construction as it was sold. If they’d used it properly, we’d have a better system now.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Which is precisely why I voted AGAINST the 1/2 cent increase.
If this forum were around back then, I would be the one guy AGAINST the 1/2 cent increase, and I would explain, “because the gov’t always screws everything up” and I’d have 49 thumbs down and negative shallow and thoughtless comments.

Listen to me know. Understand me later.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Um, Metromover isn’t going to solve the transportation issue at 30 mph with little capacity and no fares. Metrorail extensions and Coastal Link will, however.

Anonymous
1 year ago

The subway in NYC is mostly 30 mph when going local.

Anonymous
1 year ago

I just love how people like you know what will and what won’t work without risking a dime of your own money to find out.

Anonymous
1 year ago

According to this article, Per-capita tax revenue generated in Miami-Dade is more than double what is generated on average in the rest of Florida.

Anonymous
1 year ago

They are addressing it by forwarding this article to the local papers and their friends and families.

Anonymous
1 year ago

I’ve notice every time there is a article about population Mary Brickell villege is shown.

Anonymous
1 year ago

That’s cause every time they wanna show sexy urban living… there’s only one place baby.

Kendall!! er wait… I mean Brickell! 🙂

Anonymous
1 year ago

The reason the growth was lower last decade was because the recession hit in 2008 and the last three years saw almost no growth. The beginning of this decade made up for that but the growth the last few years hasnt been that high

Anonymous
1 year ago

Growth isn’t linear, news at 11!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Lets also add some pogo stick lanes to streets.

Wang
1 year ago

And yet can’t even build a light tram at street level… Hmm.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Let’s have less cars and more public transportation and bikes please. We can’t have double, triple and quadruple deckers.

Anonymous
1 year ago

We could be the first city with highrise highways. We could build highways of 20,30 or even more floors!

Anonymous
1 year ago

“Let’s have less cars and more public transportation and bikes please.”

Listen and please get this through your head, you can’t stop anyone from buying and driving a car if that’s what they want to do and you definitely can’t legislate anyone to ride a bicycle.

Mike
1 year ago

Actually, you can legislate exactly bicycle riding by restricting certain areas of the city to just bike use. However, it’s impractical because is not seen culturally as a means of transportation. We need some sort of green street car solution.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Great!!! so what the states and the local authorities are doing about it?

Anonymous
1 year ago

The density figure includes a lot of open land. Within the Urban Development Boundary the figure is 4 times that. Cities of Miami and Hialeah are a lot denser still.

Anonymous
1 year ago

TRAIN SYSTEM, NOW!!!
TRAIN SYSTEM, NOW!!!
TRAIN
TRAIN

Anonymous
1 year ago

Esto está de pinga! Mucha gente

Anonymous
1 year ago

Excellent news for public transit fans!!!
New York is losing population.
Chicago is losing population.

They have large and expensive public transportation! It is excellent (stinky, dangerous, and expensive) but a transit lovers dream.

People infatuated with Public Transportation (and no in depth knowledge of economics) should move to those Utopian transit Meccas.

Go! get in there whilst the getting is good!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Yes, Miami is soon becoming a more important city than New York City.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Two things:

1. Is it “Miami is soon becoming” or “Miami will become?”

2. What you said is only a dream, so please, stop hyping Miami’s importance.

Oh, and by the way, before you go and get all irate, I was born and raised in Miami over fifty years ago.

Anonymous
1 year ago

What a weird take, that people shouldn’t advocate for a more complete, public-serving mass transportation system. You’re cool with sitting on the 836 for two hours every morning and afternoon during rush hour? You do you! Keep driving! Woo!

Anonymous
1 year ago

What an incomplete and shallow analysis we got here from someone who believes to have an in-depth knowledge of Economics.

Anonymous
1 year ago

No sir. I walk to work, and I NEVER would be such a dope as to insist that other people pay for my transportation.

To paraphrase the great President Obama, “I ain’t yo b****, n***a. Buy yo own damn fries.”