China City Construction Completes Preliminary Approval At Brickell Site Where They Plan Miami’s Tallest Building

China City Construction Corp. has completed ‘preliminary approval’ of what they call a landmark project at the former Capital at Brickell site, according to a posting on their website last week.

China City plans to build the tallest building in Miami on the site, their website said at the time of purchase (although the property is restricted in height by aviation officials compared to other parts of downtown.) Total construction area will be about 330,000 square meters, or 3.6 million square feet.

The project remains in the planning and design stage. A partner in the project, American Da Tang Group, has said it will be targeted towards Chinese end users with amenities that cater to them.

China City is a state-owned enterprise with a philosophy that calls for ‘building socialism with Chinese characteristics.’ The company completed the purchase of the 2.78-acre Capital at Brickell site late last year along with partner American Da Tang Group for $74.74 million.

 

Scrapped project:

 

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Martim
5 years ago

Good luck getting the FAA to approve Miami’s tallest building, when this bureaucratic aviation authority gives tenants a hard time for ripping ass on their 60th floor balconies.

laz
5 years ago

its not the FAA’s fault we built our airport runways with a direct shot at downtown/Brickell

if one of those plans loses and engine they cant get enough lift to clear the buildings.

Obviously
5 years ago

So it’s buildings fault if a plane malfunctions?

The FAA is saying “if a plane falls out of the sky and hit your building, it your fault for putting the building in the malfunctioning plane’s way.”

Every building on the ground, no matter if it’s one story or 100 stories tall, is a target for a malfunctioning plane.

suomynona
5 years ago

That is TERRIBLE logic and reasoning.

Have you ever driven through the mountains anywhere? What if they didn’t have guard rails on the highway and your tire blows? You’d go flying right off the side of the mountain. Per your thinking, it’s your own fault for getting a flat tire. Don’t blame the federal authorities. According to you, it’s not their job to provide safe transportation or to enforce regulations that save lives.

Obviously
5 years ago

Amusing comparison.

If I remember correctly, the passenger jets were smashed into the World Trade Center in NYC and the Pentagon because of a malfunction. Now I know you’re thinking “but it wasn’t a mechanical malfunction.” No, but it was a security malfunction. And according to you it’s the FAA’s “job to provide safe transportation.” And after 9/11, did NYC stop building skyscrapers? No. In fact, since 9/11, NYC has built taller skyscrapers than the WTC, and a plane will get obliterated before it gets even five miles close to the Pentagon now.

Now if you know of any “guardrails” (or anything else for that matter)that can stop a passenger jet in freefall from smashing into a building on the ground, the ocean, a mountain, etc etc etc…please tell me and the FAA about it.

We don’t need planes to get to anywhere in the world we want to go. It’s the FAA’s job to make sure anything flying over our heads is safe, because planes falling out of the air is a threat to us on the ground. It’s not their job to make sure office and residential buildings are not a threat to what’s flying in the air.

Fredric
5 years ago

I must disagree with you.

The FAA is indeed a bloated US federal agency. As with most such bureaucratic institutions, they receive federal tax dollars to fund their entire existence/operation AND they keep getting larger and larger (more bloated and mindlessly bureaucratic) with the passage of time. Therefore they are increasingly under pressure to justify their existence and this is a large part of the reason that the FAA spends inordinate amounts of time “approving” or “disapproving” architectural plans for tall buildings.

The “one engine (inoperative)” rule is a FAA invention and it may seem to make sense on first glance. But as someone else pointed out, if a commercial airliner or other type of aircraft were truly disabled by engine failure then the precise height of buildings in or near the glide path to airport runways would make little to no difference. It might be different if someone were proposing to build a 600 or 700′ building one mile due east or west from the runways at MIA, because that would indeed pose a significant hazard to aircraft operations.

The point on the runways at MIA where planes typically lift off when heading in an easterly direction during takeoff is approximately seven miles west of downtown Miami. None of the areas in downtown that are presently developed with skyscrapers exist directly within the glide paths of the east-west runways at MIA. The one NW to SE runway at the airport has a glide path which crosses the southernmost part of the area of the Brickell neighborhood where high rise condos currently exist. This means that if truth be known, skyscrapers well over 1000′ in height could be constructed almost anywhere in the already development-intensive areas of downtown Miami without causing any meaningful enhanced risk to planes, the buildings themselves or people on the ground or in the air. Another factor to consider is that a fully-loaded Boeing 767 can gain a maximum of about 600 feet in altitude at full throttle (as happens during the early phase of most takeoffs) for each air mile flown. Doing the math for this equation demonstrates that a large airliner can make it to at least 4000 feet in altitude before passing directly over the skyline of downtown Miami.

Based upon all of the above and numerous other factors, if any of these major developers, such as Swire or China City Construction, OR the city of Miami and/or Miami-Dade County governments were to take the FAA to court over the habit of the latter agency to arbitrarily chop off up to several hundred feet from the building proposals presented to them for “approval,” the FAA would almost certainly lose, hands down. They would simply NOT be able to present any real and tangible evidence that routinely lowering the proposed height of buildings by 10 percent to 30 percent of the originally proposed above ground level elevation(s) would have any meaningful or measurable impact upon safety of air travel or efficacy of aircraft operations.

Anonymous
5 years ago

THANK you for posting this response. It’s about fuel savings more than actual safety.

Anonymous
5 years ago

that news is not true

Jacob
5 years ago

I’ve always been partial to the original plans for the site. Gorgeous buildings!

But I digress.

XVS
5 years ago

Couldn’t agree more. My only hope is that since the Chinese are constructing the most architecturally interesting buildings these days, maybe they’ll do it in Miami as well.

Jacob
5 years ago

Thought the same thing! God knows they have the money, too.

Marc305
5 years ago

Since I live next to this lot I welcome this project. It will be amazing having the tallest building in Miami right next door. I hope they put great restaurants and retail on the street level too.

Obviously
5 years ago

Yes, it’ll be interesting to see what height they propose, especially since we have seen the annoucement of buildings and structures in the 1000ft and over range. But a lot of us Miamian’s are extremely perturbed about the slicing down of some of the most iconic buildings to grace Miami’s skyline through the years and then see this quirky looking garbage called “Skyrise” get approved at 1000ft (I guess unlike the other buildings, this thing has the ability to move out of the way of a malfunctioning plane).

BinBrickell
5 years ago

I’ve been hoping for a good size retail space on that lot to anchor the south end of Miami Ave. We could use another grocery store since the Publix on 13th is always packed, or another Whole Foods (or higher end grocer) for the south end of town. My fear is that they make this lot a little “too Chinese” so that it doesn’t integrate well with the area. The tallest building in the city should be One Brickell City Centre at 1049ft, as that is poised to become the focal point of downtown, but I’m ok with a Chinese tower being #2 or #3.

William
5 years ago

China has allot of resources that are sitting in Nassau -Maybe their itching to move those 5000 workers here?

I guarantee the biggest S. Fl construction company Owned by a country (CHINA) – will build it!! GO PLAZA!!!

I wonder if they can move the tents from Nassau over?

William
5 years ago

DECEMBER 27, 2013

New York-based Plaza Construction, one of the nation’s leading construction management firms, announced its stock will be acquired by China Construction America, Inc. (CCA), a wholly-owned subsidiary of China State Construction Engineering Corporation Limited, in a private transaction.

China State or China City?

wpolom
5 years ago

The FAA will not approve anything taller than 600 FT for that site.

Marc305
5 years ago

The FAA approved Panorama at 849 feet. All they have to get is 850 feet to claim the tallest building in Miami, considering this lot is less than a quarter mile away from Panorama I don’t see why the FAA would say no.

WhyNotNow
5 years ago

real estate just keeps going, up, up, up!

Richard
5 years ago

Oh lets see, you mean a one story building is not important. If a plan can’t clear a building even at 1000 ft or 1200 ft it sure is not going to make it to the airport at all. I would say that most planes at that far out are about 2000 ft up and closer to the airport maybe a few feet above some homes and if they crashed would most probable take out a few hundred homes etc etc. Also who’s to say a plan would not hit the builds now too. I guess we just have to worry about something that might happen or never happen. So with that thinking don’t leave your home because you might get hit by a car!!! The chances of a plane hitting a building is less likely to happen then your chances of getting hit by a car, or drowning in the ocean, or getting bit by a shark, or getting mugged or or or or!!!

Expresswayvisual
5 years ago

The FAA is worried about an engine failing on take off. There are guidelines that a plane has to pass in order to be certified. Buildings that are 1,000ft in Brickell/Downtown start to enter the safety margin that airplanes have to take into account when taking off from MIA.

Everyone likes to compare NYC area airport to MIA but the fact is that the airport runways in NYC do not aim straight at downtown or midtown Manhattan.
If you look at follow LGA’s runway 13/31 extended centerline you’ll notice that it goes over northern Manhattan where there are no tall buildings. If you try putting a 1,000ft high obstacle there the FAA will have something to say about it.

Jz
5 years ago

I always wanted a Chinatown in Miami. I suppose a Chinatower will have to do.

BinBrickell
5 years ago

I always refer to the corner of Miami Ave/11th St and the small strip of Japanese restaurants on 11th as “Little Tokyo” 😛 If this block becomes a complex of several buildings it very well could be a Chinatown

Hope Solo
5 years ago

Let’s hope that they go with some fine-dining Chinese restaurants on the retail level, like Panda Express, P.F. Chang’s, or Manchu Wok.

Expresswayvisual
5 years ago

Remind again why Miamians are okay with Communist China but no Communist Cuba? Didn’t the city of Miami threw a fit because Odebrecht built something in Cuba?

XVS
5 years ago

Probably for the same reason that Americans are not ok with Iran, but are perfectly fine with Saudi Arabia, although the former is far more democratic than the latter. You can go on and on. Hypocrisy is a mother’s milk of geopolitics.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Who cares ???