Construction Permit Filed This Week To Build 890-Foot Okan Tower, With Suffolk As Contractor

Turkish developer Okan Group is moving forward with construction of their 70-story Okan Tower in downtown Miami, which will become the tallest in the city.

Contractor Suffolk Construction applied this week for a construction permit to begin the work, city records show. The application was filed for on September 16, with a fee of $447,944 charged by the city’s Building Department.

The project had already been sent last year for review by the Planning & Zoning Department, but no review by the Building Department has yet taken place (a construction permit filed for last year by a consultant was just a dry run).

It will likely take months for a construction permit to be issued, but contractors could also opt for another permit that allows foundation work to begin sooner if they choose to do so.

The newly filed permit estimates a hard construction cost of $159,980,000.

The permit also states there will be 316 hotel rooms, 399 residential units, 65,828 square feet of office, and 2,915 square feet of retail.

Hotel rooms and condo-hotel units will be managed by Hilton, with the property to become known as the Hilton Miami Bayfront.

Earlier this summer, the developer converted reservations of condo units into contracts, and issued broker commissions.

When completed, the tulip-shaped Okan Tower will top off at 890 feet above ground, a height that is taller than any other building in Miami.

 

 

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Anonymous

Almost too good to be true … but I bet they build it… it’s beautiful addition to our skyline and stands out as unique in design

Anonymous

Finally a design that tapers at the top rather than a flat top. Hope work can begin quickly.

Anonymous

OMG!!!
exactly my thought, I am so tired of the flat tops, we have allowed a very boring skyline in our city.

Anonymous

so just like a dildo?

Anonymous

Love this girl ^ 😉

Anonymous

They better build it fast before those prime views get block by proposed adjacent towers.

Go Miami go!

Absolutely amazing and beautiful building. This will help put and keep Miami in a international spot light.
Go sunny Miami go.

Anonymous

What a beauty

Anonymous

Just add 10 more feet..why not?!

Anonymous

1000 feet even would have been sweet with this one.

Shawn Kouri

More office spaces! Awesome. Doesn’t look like it will be completed until 2023 or 2024. It’s taking a pretty long time.

Anonymous

500k to file a building permit…highway robbery, and some how there’s no money for real mass transit

Anonymous

Is your issue with the cost of the permit, or with the lack of mass transit? If anything it sounds like you should be for this cost and should be mad at how it’s not going towards better infrastructure and transport.

Anonymous

Have to generate money somehow and that’s a drop in the bucket for developers. The issue is how the money is managed afterwards.

Anonymous

I’m thrilled about this.
Love what it will do for downtown.

Anonymous

Its sad to see that the hardworking and talented Architects don’t get any credit!

Anonymous

The engineers are the magic makers here, and the GC estimators and construction supers/managers who will do the work. By the way, OKAN group is a terrible group of people. Very disrespectful people, awful to do business with, and they build for lowest price, not highest value… would never invest in a building built by OKAN group. Suffolk is better than OKAN group and I feel bad that they won the bid because they will hate working with OKAN…

Anonymous

A Hilton Hotel? Are you kidding me?? With so many upscale brands having no Miami presence, it is odd to select a mid-level chain hotel group to put in this beautiful structure. Puzzling decision…

Anonymous

Agreed. An ultra-high end property with a lower-tiered hotel chain seemingly devalues the project and is an odd choice overall

Anonymous

OKAN group is a joke. That’s why they are going with Hilton.

Anonymous

The application was filed for on September 16, with a fee of $447,944 charged by the city’s Building Department. *** HOW much for a building permit ??!!

Anonymous

Permits are usually a percentage of total construction costs. Look it up.

Anonymous

To dumb it down its roughly 1% of the first $30M then 0.5% of the remaining hard cost > $30M

Anonymous

My math works this permit out to 60 million in value.. so it’s only a partial permit.

Anonymous

At that rate, is there any wonder why the building department does not give a damn about design/architecture? They just want the money. Shameful! Beautiful design.

Anonymous

With Downtown 5th to the South and Melo Future Towers to the East. Don’t understand how the sales are there.

Anonymous

this is a beautiful building, I hope it gets built.

Anonymous

Awesome

Anonymous

OKAY, HURRY UP. BREAK GROUND OR KILL THE PROJECT.

Anonymous

can this thing get started already it seems like every week an update has been made on an approval…let us know when vertical has begun bring grace and awe to Miami

Anonymous

Sad it isn’t being built on Biscayne boulevard.

Anonymous

Not gonna happen, just like Aston Martin Residences. Better sell to Mana, because he will definitely build! /sarcasm

Anonymous

Miami has a bunch of flat top buildings because of the FAA. Certainly developers could build to the same height, but without flat tops and filled with spires, but the usable height of the buildings would be diminished. This building, though not my favorite, attempts the strike a balance between flat roofs and spires.

Anonymous

Looks like a giant dong

Anonymous

and Melo downtown 5th project would have been topped off by now.

John

Somewhat surprised with their picking the Hilton flag.

A plus that it will be relatively blue-collar brand

Anonymous

LOL Hilton is “blue collar brand” to you????

Guess you never had to stay at a Days Inn or Motel 6….all silver spoons for you!

Anonymous

Why is the city dragging its feet ?

Anonymous

the city? Oken keeps pushing the deadlines back.

Anonymous

Uh, the article said it could take months for the city to look at the permit.