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Dade Official Proposes Hyperloop That Would Connect Miami To Orlando In 26 Minutes

Miami to Orlando could be among the first Hyperloop routes in the country, with a travel time of just over 26 minutes.

The route was one of eleven announced as finalists today by Hyperloop One, which has hundreds of employees working on a prototype. Two or three will eventually be selected to build.

State and local officials are said to be a part of the proposal. Alice Bravo, Miami-Dade director of public works, told The Verge that the route would transport tourists between Miami and Orlando, as well as cargo from the Port of Miami.

The 26 minute trip time compares to 3 hours and 40 minutes by bus or 55 minutes by plane. Bravo also said that the hyperloop from Miami could eventually extend to Atlanta or Chicago.

“We think this is a corridor that could serve as a national stimulus,” Bravo said, “for this area of innovation and human capital intellect.”

A press release from Hyperloop One also said that Florida Department of Transportation officials are a part of the proposal.

 

 

 

Hyperloop One Unveils its Vision for America, Details 11 Routes as Part of Global Challenge
Company Announces Completion of Tube Installation at Las Vegas DevLoop, World’s First Full-System Test Track

Routes Include: Boston-Somerset-Providence, Cheyenne-Houston, Chicago-Columbus-Pittsburgh, Denver-Colorado Springs, Denver-Vail, Kansas City-St. Louis, Los Angeles-San Diego, Miami-Orlando, Reno-Las Vegas, Seattle-Portland; and Dallas/Fort Worth-Austin-San Antonio-Houston
WASHINGTON, April 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Executives from Hyperloop One joined leading policymakers and transportation experts here today to reveal details of select Hyperloop routes in the United States and to initiate a nationwide conversation about the future of American transportation.

Of more than 2,600 participants in the Hyperloop One Global Challenge, 11 teams presented routes, linking 35 states and covering more than 4,200 miles. They join 24 other teams from around the globe, each vying to be among 12 finalists. Three eventual winners will work closely with Hyperloop One engineering and business development teams to explore project development and financing.

“Hyperloop One is the only company in the world building an operational commercial Hyperloop system,” said Rob Lloyd, chief executive officer of Hyperloop One. “This disruptive technology – conceived, developed and built in the U.S. – will move passengers and cargo faster, cleaner and more efficiently. It will transform transportation as we know it and create a more connected world.”

Lloyd said that by year’s end the company will have a team of 500 engineers, fabricators, scientists and other employees dedicated to bringing the technology to life. Hyperloop One, he said, will enable broad benefits across communities and markets, support sustainable manufacturing and supply chains, ease strain on existing infrastructure and improve the way millions live and work.

With Hyperloop One, passengers and cargo are loaded into a pod, and accelerate gradually via electric propulsion through a low-pressure tube. The pod quickly lifts above the track using magnetic levitation and glides at airline speeds for long distances due to ultra-low aerodynamic drag. This week, the company finalized the tube installation on its 1640-foot-long DevLoop, located in the desert outside of Las Vegas; the facility serves as an outdoor lab for its proprietary levitation, propulsion, vacuum and control technologies.

“The U.S. has always been a global innovation vanguard – driving advancements in computing, communication and media to rail, automobiles and aeronautics,” said Shervin Pishevar, executive chairman of Hyperloop One. “Now, with Hyperloop One, we are on the brink of the first great breakthrough in transportation technology of the 21st century, eliminating the barriers of time and distance and unlocking vast economic opportunities.”

“Hyperloop One is the American Dream, and it’s fast becoming an American reality,” Pishevar said.

The Hyperloop One Global Challenge
The Hyperloop One Global Challenge kicked off in May 2016 as an open call to individuals, universities, companies and governments to develop comprehensive proposals for deploying Hyperloop One’s transport technology in their region. Five of the proposals – including those from Texas, Florida, Colorado, Nevada and Missouri – involve officials from their state Departments of Transportation.

Proposed routes that would greatly reduce passenger and cargo transport times across some of the country’s most heavily trafficked regions including Los Angeles-San Diego, Miami-Orlando and Seattle-Portland. The longest distance proposal, Cheyenne-Houston, would run 1,152 miles across four states, reducing to 1 hour and 45 minutes a journey that currently takes 17 hours by car or truck.

Hyperloop One’s panel of experts in transportation, technology, economics and innovation are considering the following route proposals:

The global challenge expert panel comprises: Peter Diamandis, Founder and Executive Chairman of the XPRIZE Foundation; Bassam Mansour, International Railway Industry Advisor and Director of Rail Systems at HSS Engineers; Clive Burrows, Group Engineering Director for FirstGroup; Ulla Tapaninen, Senior Specialist in Economic Development for the City of Helsinki and adjunct professor at University of Turku.

Vision for America Conference
In addition to new details on the U.S. routes, the D.C. event featured a roundtable of speakers discussing the future of transportation that included former Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx; KPMG Head of Infrastructure Andy Garbutt; MIT Professor Alan Berger; Vice President of Corporate Communications and Government Affairs of Amtrak, Caroline Decker; and former BNSF Railway Vice President of Network Strategy Dean Wise. Keynote remarks were delivered by Tyler Duvall, partner at McKinsey & Co. and former Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy at the US Dept. of Transportation.

“The U.S. is challenged to meet the growing demands on our transportation infrastructure, with congestion costing the economy more than $160 billion per year due to wasted time and fuel,” said Tyler Duvall, a partner at McKinsey & Company. “However, new technologies are poised to drive efficiency, increase capacity, and help spur social and economic growth. To seize this opportunity, the approach to infrastructure planning must keep pace by integrating new technologies and taking long-term views of what mobility will look like in the future.”

For more information on Hyperloop One, please visit www.hyperloop-one.com.

About Hyperloop One
Hyperloop One is reinventing transportation by developing the world’s first Hyperloop, an integrated structure to move passengers and cargo between two points immediately, safely, efficiently and sustainably. Our team has the world’s leading experts in engineering, technology and transport project delivery, working in tandem with global partners and investors to make Hyperloop a reality, now. Headquartered in Los Angeles, the company is led by CEO Rob Lloyd and co-founded by Executive Chairman Shervin Pishevar and President of Engineering Josh Giegel. For more information, please visit www.hyperloop-one.com.

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65 Comments on "Dade Official Proposes Hyperloop That Would Connect Miami To Orlando In 26 Minutes"

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Anonymous
Anonymous

meanwhile it will still take an hour to go from Downton to Kendall

Anonymous
Anonymous

? No lies detected. The accuracy of that statement. Haha

Anonymous
Anonymous

4 hours by public transit!

Anonymous
Anonymous

True.. Or an hour and a half to Homestead. My daily route. lol

Anonymous
Anonymous

You’re nuts to waste 3 hrs of your life in traffic everyday

Esther
Esther

On a good day. And how much in tolls?

Anonymous
Anonymous

What about a hyper loop from Miami to New York? hmmm

Anonymous
Anonymous

That would be AWESOME !

Anonymous
Anonymous

Have to start small… can’t just do that first it would take 30 years to build that

Anonymous
Anonymous

Elon Musk the creator of this concept even says not feasible – has to be long straight line. Flying is more economically feasible for such long distances.

suomynona
suomynona

No it doesn’t. It can curve/turn just like any other transportation method.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Please, please, please

Malanga Kimbumbia
Malanga Kimbumbia

They haven’t finished Palmetto & Dolphin-836, nor the airport entrance and someone’s already proposing this Californian task?!?! Caballero…

Anonymous
Anonymous

brightline down the dump

Anonymous
Anonymous

Nah, not in the short term anyway. The proposed Hyperloop will be far from WPB. Although if this proves viable it will change all transportation including air travel.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yeah I agree — this would take a long time to realize, and I think Brightline’s greatest virtue is the location of its stations. I doubt Hyperloop would be able to secure prime downtown real estate in Miami. So sure, you got here in a half hour from Orlando, but now you have to rent a car and slog along the 836 for an hour to get downtown. I might be inclined to take the train in that scenario…

Not saying that this project isn’t super cool, just that I don’t think it’s directly competitive with rail (not right away, anyway)

Anonymous
Anonymous

Adding a car carrier car… similar to Amtrak Acela would fix a lot of issues.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Although the new Brightline is looking to do a similar feat, they currently only have plans to connect South Florida, with ambitions to connect to Orlando in the future. Now there are two options on the table, and this one is very attractive. Hopefully the Brightline plans do not interfere with allowing the Florida Hyperloop to get built as well!

Anonymous
Anonymous

This would be awesome. Expand it to New York and LA with stops in various major cities and no more airplanes for me.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Dade Citizen Proposes Intelligent Dade Officials Who Can Do Smart Things Now With Existing Technology Instead Of Doing Nothing But Fantasize About Technology 30 Years Away.

City Commissioner
City Commissioner

This would be great!!!Good Luck convincing the Car lobbyist that have already delayed the Brightline to Orlando and will definitely oppose this…

Anonymous
Anonymous

Why do you need to get from Miami to Orlando in 26 minutes?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well this would be the first hop. It’s a good choice seeing as how the land between the two cities is flat and cheap. It would be awesome to be able to work in Miami and live in Orlando.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Love the idea….hate to drive to Orlando.safer and faster….

Tomas Possenti
Tomas Possenti

Does anyone else notice that it seems that the route utilizes US27 for 90% of the distance?

marc
marc

This as probable here in Florida as Mana building anything.

Anonymous
Anonymous

So you’re saying there’s a chance?!

Edin
Edin

One in a million?

Anonymous
Anonymous

I see whst you did there?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Everything’s wonderful on the internet. It’s when you get to reality that issues arise.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Sounds wonderful How about using it between Miami and Miami Beach?

suomynona
suomynona

Most likely not economically feasible given the short distance.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Great another tourist attraction. What about a connection to Tampa Bay,

suomynona
suomynona

Seriously, Miami to Orlando to Tampa is the ONLY route that makes any sense. Tampa/St Pete is a larger netro than Orlando. I get that Orlando has that crappy thing called Disney, but it would be beyond stupid not to connect the state’s two largest metros.

suomynona
suomynona

Buncha dummies.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I hope that the hyperloop concept:

1) Is workable to the point of implementation.
2) Completely changes the discussion about rail infrastructure.

Because just now…the billions being spent / proposed for “traditional” high speed rail looks like a total waste.This would be true even if hyperloop didn’t exist.

suomynona
suomynona

Where in the US are they proposing true “high speed rail”? Certainly it isn’t in Florida.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I’m in California…which (ironically) is the hub for hyperloop research. Meanwhile…the state is floating billions in bonds & raising taxes & getting federal matching funds (pre-Trump) to get (comparatively inadequate imo) high speed rail to connect LA to SF. It’s already messy before even one spike has been driven.The “good news” is that the red tape keeping things un-built (for now) is giving hyperloop a change to present it’s case.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Someone might want to check that money trail from Sen. Dianne Feinstein to her husband who is profiting wildly from that CA rail project. Project success is irrelevant when corruption leads the way.

Just asking
Just asking

Why is it important to connect to Orlando?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Why didn’t they just approve All Aboard to have a genuine bullet train? Maglev train technology is proven already. This is an empty promise given EPA restrictions, county issues such as those created from Martin County. Not to mention the testing required for this means it will be another 10-15 years before the technology is accepted.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Sounds wonderful.

Just Saying
Just Saying

Hopefully the corruption that plagues Miami Dade won’t curtail this transportation project. It will benefit the hard working honest folks that dont have deep pockets.

Just asking
Just asking

How does this help hardworki g folk?

Anonymous
Anonymous

So what would happen to the train being built right now?
Of course, the one being built will chug at a turtle pace…
What else is new?
Fast trains only happen in Europe, Asia and Middle East.
Even the Acela runs at half the speed of the fast trains in Europe

Leonardo
Leonardo

I would imagine if this actually gets build then the hyperloop would cost a lot more since it’s a very expensive project. So the Bright line might end up being a cheaper alternative while hyperloop is super fast but also super expensive. Imagine the brightline cost 3 billion so the hyperloop could easily go up to 10 billion dollars. Therefore brightline train won’t loose business.

Anonymous
Anonymous

another assault on our sensitive Everglades…Has it not been damaged enough ?

Anonymous
Anonymous

You’re aware that hyperloops are completely infeasible right?

suomynona
suomynona

Yea bro. So are electric vehicles. And reusable rockets. And solar panels. And battery storage. Oh, wait…

Anonymous
Anonymous

LOL
DREAM ON
This would never happen here.
Only in Middle East and Asia can they enjoy this wonderful way to travel.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Sadly that’s true. This country has fallen so behind on infrastructure/innovation that all these politicians should have been sent home by most have enjoyed 10+ years in their seats.

Anonymous
Anonymous

It really is a shame we don’t have slave labor from India/Bangladesh to work/die on all of the projects…./sarcasm

Anonymous
Anonymous

I agree but when you consider the fact how populated those countries. They and no choice but to innovated public transportation.

Anonymous
Anonymous

stop f****** up my state it isn’t one big Disney World with a monorail to get you from A to B if you want to be in Miami live in f****** Miami leave the countryside alone

Anonymous
Anonymous

This Hyperloop seems highly impractical. Musk is a genius, but because he is a space guy, he should just commercialize his super-fast rocket ships to accomplish the same goal as the Hyperloop, but without all the infrastructure. Simple enough.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Srsly?

Pro-Hyperloop
Pro-Hyperloop

There are several reasons that a space ship from Miami to Orlando is less practical than the Hyperloop. First of all, Cape Kennedy is not close to either Orlando or Miami so you would have to construct a spaceship launch port in both Miami and Orlando. Practical? I thought not. Second of all, space travel is extraordinarily expensive. Would be far more practical if we used space travel from Miami to Tampa. Also keep in mind, that while space travel can take place at speeds north of 13,000 mph, you must factor in that you have to go up very high above the earth and so therefore the speeds are a bit misleading. The Hyperloop might just be more practical, overall.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Once again, a waste of resources!!! We have the brightline train coming, what do we need hyperloop for? Lets invest in public green spaces or more express lanes on the highway. Sometimes i just dont get it…

Oscar
Oscar

“Yeah, let’s solve our long-term transportation challenges with more express lanes. Cars, they’re the wave of the future.” – 1956

Oscar
Oscar

Ugh. Really regret not using an exclamation point there.

City Commissioner
City Commissioner

Your express lanes are paved over the green space. Maybe you meant more bike lanes and more green space!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Mr. Commissioner, First of all, thank you so much for responding to my comment! Second, and with all due respect, the express lanes are not paved over green space. The FL Highway system is a clearly defined area and in looking at the highways between here and Orlando, there is no Park Space next to the highways. I meant more green space in the cities and some more express lanes on the highways.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Hilarious that you think that’s a real commissioner. If he is I’d hate to think he’s appointed for such a role… I’ve seen his other comments.

Just asking
Just asking

So which commissioner is this? Ever hear of water stirage south if Lake O? Like where this route lies?

wait
wait

QUE QUE

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