Conversion Of Former INS Building Into A Hilton Garden Inn Is Planned

Architecture firm Stantec is working on plans to convert the former INS building at 79th and Biscayne into a hotel and apartment complex:

Miami, FL (April 19, 2016) – The former U.S. Immigration Naturalization Service (INS) 12-story building in Miami will be redesigned by the architecture and design firm Stantec and converted to a 139-key Hilton Garden Inn. The hotel is part of the mixed-use development project Triton Center that will also include three residential buildings, with a combined total of 325 apartments. Located at 7880 Biscayne Blvd, Triton Center will become the epicenter of the upper Biscayne Boulevard area, which is just north of Miami’s famous MiMo District that’s also seeing a revitalization.

Owned by real estate developer Florida Fullview Immigration Building, LLC, the 722,000 sf development will also feature 17,000 sf of ground-level retail and 585 indoor parking spaces. A 20-foot pedestrian passage within a city plaza-like environment between the residential buildings and hotel complexes will be added. Each building will have its own pool and fitness center. Lush landscape and shading trees will surround street level retail and food outlets.

Stantec will continue the building’s vanguard spirit; integrating white stucco and metal panels highlighted with bright Miami accent colors and glass curtain walls. The project is expected to achieve LEED Silver certification.

Originally built in the 1960s as the Gulf American, the building was recognized as a vanguard, mid-century modern tower with distinctive anodized aluminum sunscreens and tall transparent glass curtain walls spilling out to the street at its base. INS moved into the building in 1983 and vacated in 2008.

Stantec, a recognized national leader in architecture and design, is working on other prominent residential projects throughout Florida, including the Ritz-Carlton Residences in Miami Beach; Jade Signature in Sunny Isles; Luma at Miami Worldcenter; Solitair Residences in Brickell; and 330 Third Street in Downtown St. Petersburg.

 

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JR
5 years ago

Could of swore I saw this article a year ago..

Gables
5 years ago

Get it done!

Rod
5 years ago

So many bad memories of that damn building and its condescending employees, glad to see something good is coming out of it.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Agree,so far nothing but talk.

Anonymous
5 years ago

With another news release, I was expecting something about ADD, Inc./Stantec changing the design, hopefully replacing the strange window patterns and facades consistent with the orderly rest of the buildings. So much by them features that weird motif, which looks cheap.

The Wave of Shorecrest proposed to the north and new Shorecrest Club to the east are more beautiful. Any development might be good for the area, but on the east side of the tracks, it should be top-notch to serve as a northern gateway of the city.

Anonymous
5 years ago

The Shorecrest Club looks exactly like a Marriott Couryard and is a totally boring design w/ zero lot line, zero imagination and zero landscaping. I think this design is fabulous; love the trees and ground floor retail to bring some bodies to a desolate area.
Let’s get moving already!

Anonymous
5 years ago

It’s literally on a curve to a highway bridge. I do agree the 80th Street facade would have been better with some townhouses covering the garage. The architecture is in character with the historic Shorecrest neighborhood. Some modern architecture of merit like The Wave of Shorecrest is welcome, too. Consequently, all should have street interaction where applicable.

Anonymous
5 years ago

When is expected delivery date for this project to be complete?

Anonymous
5 years ago

Great addition to the area. Will encourage more investors with new projects to the integration of Biscayne Blvrd .

Anonymous
5 years ago

but seriously when are they going to stop talking about this and actually do it?!

Anonymous
5 years ago

The other buildings are much taller than the zoning code allows.