Domo’s Concept Design To Replace Lincoln Road Macy’s

Domo Architecture + Design has published a concept design on their website to replace the Macy’s near Lincoln Road in South Beach.

Last year, the property was put into play with the leasehold said to be on the market. Macy’s has a leasehold on the property for 33 more years.

The rendering was prepared by Domo in 2016, according to their website.

 

 

(photo: phillip pessar)

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fer

me like it. get it done!

Anonymous

Hopefully Macy’s remains a tenant.

Anonymous

It shows Bloomingdale’s, which is owned by the same parent company. What a sign of the times, when mid-market stores like Macy’s aren’t as economically viable as upscale ones like Bloomingdale’s or off-price ones like Marshalls right next door.

AndrewN

I am doubtful that Bloomingdale’s would be coming in place of Macy’s. Bloomingdale’s isn’t expanding much these days.

Anonymous

Are any major department stores? Well, apart from Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus to Manhattan.

Bloomingdale’s recently opened a store at the Ala Moana Center in Honolulu. Meanwhile, the downtown Macy’s closed and turned into a Walmart. It literally looks and feels like a Third World country.

Anonymous

The problem is, the market is too flooded. Retailers are cannibalizing one another.

Anthony

Macy’s has to go, it’s kinda dated and doesn’t match the area in my opinion. Bloomys or Nordstrom would make more sense

Anonymous

Save the neon sign but get rid of the rest. A Bloomingdales would be a great addition to the area. Macy’s has lost it’s allure in recent years…

Leo

It is truly sad that in Miami everything is razed every 30-40 years. The building housing Macys off Lincoln Rd is a fine example of MiMo architecture, but more importantly it housed Burdines Dept Store, an iconic link to the history of Miami. Most who want to demolish and build anew are not from here and therefore have no links to the history of Miami and Miami Beach. Manhattan repurposes its historical structures and adds to them without bulldozing. In such a transient city it is important to create points of reference.

Anonymous

A modern take on Streamline Moderne architecture. LOVE IT.
Crank up the bulldozers!

Anonymous

As long as it doesn’t destroy the historic structure.

Anonymous

What is historic about that building?

Anonymous

MiMo retail architecture, although clearly it would be destroyed and/or altered beyond recognition.

Anonymous

The building is not historic

Oscar

Don’t know if it’s designated historic (I imagine not), but it was built in 1953. The neon sign and overhang are cool enough but I’m not sure if any of the architectural elements are really begging to be saved. Can’t tell in the rendering but I wish they keep the overhang. Those are typically against code on new construction but dammit do I love that shade they provide.

Anonymous

Against the code, huh? Gotta make sure people get that big bright sun while trying to encourage walkability. It makes you wonder why the overhang existed in the first place. I swear, something put in the water since 1953 is making us retarded.

Anonymous

there is nothing in the building code that would prohibit the overhang, which technically is not an overhang but the second floor cantilevers off the first. the zoning code might have rules prohibiting the depth of the overhang but generally those are allowed in commercial structures.

Anonymous

yeah exactly! historic structure is the most incorrectly over-used phrase in Miami Beach. It’s part of this nimby anti-development philosophy that’s taking over unfortunately. they just throw that out there to see what sticks and how they can prevent any development public or private

Anonymous

True to an extent. It’s been used in Miami proper to designate some mediocre 1950s houses and buildings to stop development, while real historic stuff from the 1920s is destroyed in Little Havana/Riverside and Shenandoah and South Brickell/Coconut Grove. A new historic district consisting of beautiful old 1920s homes around St. Gaudens Road was proposed a couple months ago, but some carpetbagger and his lawyer killed it because he wants to demolish, subdivide lots, build, and sell hideous concrete box houses.

Anonymous

Anti development? Miami Beach? That’s a good one. You must not live here.

Anonymous

No, I just probably don’t go around the city with contempt for people and new things like the MDPL who goes around like little communists trying to stifle economic development and private property rights