Downsized Plans For Triptych Approved By Planning & Zoning

Revised plans for Triptych have been approved with waivers under the Miami 21 Zoning code.

The project is proposed to include a Hilton Curio hotel, along with retail and office space.

In September 2016, The JQ Group of Companies purchased a stake in the project for a price “north of $10 million” from HES Group. The developer told The Real Deal that the project size was being reduced to a 20-story tower with 38,000 square feet of retail, 41,000 square feet of office space, 252-room Curio By Hilton hotel, and 300 parking spaces.

Shortly after the sale, the revised plans were submitted. Final approval of the new plans took about nine months.

21 Comments
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Anonymous
3 years ago

LOL at the new massing.

Anonymous
3 years ago

have you seen the old massing?! It was a lol as well. I really hope our Design Review Board does their job and says something about this pile of crap.

Anonymous
3 years ago

I will give an ‘A’ for effort but this design is pure chaos. It looks like a Brickell City Center Remix on acid.

Gables
3 years ago

Looks like this will be a nice addition to that busy intersection. As it currently is, that lot is fenced off, ugly, and full of trash and ugly banner advertisements.

Anonymous
3 years ago

36th street especially at biscayne is a nightmare. need “19-th century” light rail technology to fix it.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Sorry to tell you, there is no lightrail or Metro rail or bus route system that will fix the problem of a city that gives more importance to parking lots than aesthetic, pragmatism and no central core.

Oscar
3 years ago

You’ve won the Miami Internet today with this comment. You can pick up your prize at Carlos Gimenez’s office.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Like 45 % of Edgewater, downtown, Wynwood, Omni, A&E, Overtown.
Only in the U.S. the cores of the cities are left empty to be filled with empty lots and derelicts while the ever expanding suburbs with no transit are thriving. What the government, car companies and mindless, expanding suburbs did to the American cities will take another 100 years to repair.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Damn Bro, Duany Plater Zyberk really got their claws into you!

Anonymous
3 years ago

The United States cannot be compared to cities that are hundreds if not thousands of years old. MOVE!

Anonymous
3 years ago

Miami, no. But cities like Boston and Philadelphia, yes. European cities might be older and more organic (although Boston certainly has such a street layout), but buildings are about the same age, from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The idea of historic preservation didn’t start until the the former, and the remaining stock not demolished and replaced during industrialization burned down in World War II.

With that said, I have no idea what your point is. New Urbanism and infill is the return to ideas which built American cities. Unfortunately, policy like Miami 21 and CRAs are pointless when you don’t have the infrastructure like transit and walkability which built what used to exist where parking lots are in the first place.

Anonymous
3 years ago

With the current exception of Overtown, all of those neighborhoods have a lot of in-fill development happening. As more residents are added, more businesses will want to be located nearby. Greater density has the potential to make transit more viable if folks are willing to use it.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Well, compared to that description, anything would look better.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Looks great

Anonymous
3 years ago

are we looking at the same images? In what regard do you think it looks great?

Anonymous
3 years ago

Great location, good scale for that corner.. artsy design and colors.. fits well between all three neighborhoods.

Anonymous
3 years ago

“Artsy,” LOL.

Anonymous
3 years ago

The sad thing is the Architect whom designed this building (Willy Bermello) is not only a part of the Urban Design Review Board he is the most outspoken when it comes to design.

Anonymous
3 years ago

You armchair architects that always have something to say about the building designs, please direct us to a link showing examples of your superior work. It gets tiring!

Anonymous
3 years ago

What a hot mess….why do architects in Miami feel the need to garnish roofs and decks with a few haphazardly placed palm trees? They look ridiculous and diminish any design.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Cluttered windows, check. Pukey colors, check. Box, check. Wasted dpotential for a great location, check. All the signs of a cheap and nasty excuse of a building.