The Edge On Brickell Developer Requests Approval For Taller Building, More Hotel Rooms

Miami’s Planning & Zoning Department has received an application for revised plans from the developer of The Edge on Brickell.

The proposal now includes 198 hotel rooms, while the number of residential units has been decreased to 70 from 130.

The project height is now 58 stories instead of 55, and 631 feet tall instead of 606.

A law firm representing The River Front Master Association, Inc. (which includes Ivy, Wind & Mint condo buildings) has also requested a copy of the plans, indicating they could be planning to challenge approval.

Kobi Karp is the project architect.

 

 

 

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marc

As long as they don’t pull any shenanigans with the river walk. This latest design is a huge improvement over the last one. The other thing I’m skeptical about is this being Miami 21 compliant or the use of robotic parking on such a narrow street. The line to get in will be interesting to say the least. This one is a head scratcher. I’m sure the developer curses the day it paid what it did for this tiny lot.

Anonymous

yeah good point, the parking and vehicular circulation is a cluster f%^$ and 1/2.

miami1

This thing refuses to die!!!

suomynona

How does this current proposal satisfy the Riverwalk mandate?

Look at Neo Vertika just to the west. Edge is basically proposing to put its entire building in the outdoor area between NV and the River (north-south width-wise). That just doesn’t seem to work.

Anonymous

I live in the Mint directly across from this site. The traffic that chokes this street is about to get a lot worse when you add cars waiting for valet, drop off, etc. Miami, the city that just never learns.

Anonymous

Miami: The city that just never learns.

Anonymous

How about u don’t drive and walk. Now u learned something

Uhhhnonymous

Mint and Edge are on opposite sides of the river…that street doesn’t even directly connect to Miami Ave

Anonymous

hope it doesn’t fall over.

Anonymous

Are you serious?

Anonymous

I thought the EXACT same thing!!!!

GMX

i like the design but i hate the location…i wish they would mandate all future developmets to sit back further from the river edge

Anonymous

Beautiful architecture! The name fits the billing!

Anonymous

really interesting proportions, nice project

Marc

Just build the river walk already!!!

Anonymous

I don’t get the idea of this wall in a very narrow street , with difficult access , no parkings in the area …. crazy . Architect think everything the draw could be build able …. crazy again …..

Anonymous

Obviously you don’t get it.
You cannot express yourself

Anonymous

No, your English skills are very poor. What country are you from?

Anonymous

Ya know, just for the heck of it, I would like to see something like this get built in Miami. It seems like too many people in Miami are afraid to get adventurous. This is a beautifully designed building and I, for one, want to see it in Miami’s skyline.

Anonymous

I cant believe how tall it is in compared to Neo Vertika. There goes some of my view…There needs to be a riverwalk for sure.

Anonymous

Beautiful building

Anonymous

Another grotesque and insipid slab of glass and concrete choking the Miami River. Although Miami has some creative architecture, most of it is, well, predictably trendy that will not age well. The city has all but destroyed the best waterfront development opportunities in the country (half a block removed from the bay on Brickell, and for all practical purposes, you could be in Omaha). And now it is allowing the river to be destroyed as well. You want to see the future in 20 years? Multiply this slab up and down the river bank and from the air you will see a high rise serpentine from the airport to the bay. The ‘Edge’ indeed; the edge of even more crass, uninspired architecture being built on amazing urban waterfront sites. Kobi Krap should rethink this one.

Anonymous

So what would you propose over glass and concrete? Paper mache? You’re not making any sense with your choice of building materials. I’m assuming you are all for cheap building materials that look like hell.

Anonymous

Get real…in a lot of places this wouldn’t even be called a “river” it would be considered a “stream.” The water was so polluted at one time they had to clean it up before anything worthy was allowed to be built on it’s shore.