Edgewater’s 40-Story 1836 Biscayne Tower Scheduled For A Hearing Before The Urban Development Review Board Today

Miami’s Urban Development Review Board has scheduled a meeting today to review plans for the 1836 Biscayne tower in Edgewater.

A 1925 Neoclassical Revival style church designed by architect August Geiger is on the property. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1988, but two attempts to locally designate the property as historic failed after encountering opposition.

Developer Fifteen Group is proposing to preserve the church and build an apartment tower that rises 40 stories, or 419 feet above ground next to it. A portion of the new tower will jut out over the church building.

The new plans appears much more practical and economical to build compared to previous proposals, which would have required support columns be placed inside the existing church building.

At the ground floor, the existing sanctuary area will be converted into retail, with a sloped floor to be replaced by a flat floor if the tenant requests it. A residential lobby will also be built.

Above that will be another level of retail in the church. In the tower, a 10-story podium will extend upward with mostly parking space.

Amenities will be on levels 10 and 11, including spa and pool areas.

Levels 13 through 38 will have apartment units, with a total of 364 units.

A rooftop lounge will be located on level 39, with indoor and outdoor kitchens and dining areas, a fire pit, a pool, and cabanas.

Total building height is 418 feet.

 

 

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transplant
1 year ago

When I think good skyline, I think diverse architecture and styles. Love this design and it’s color (much like the Nativo base color).

Anonymous
1 year ago

So you must not think of Miami

Anonymous
1 year ago

This bricks belong to Baltimore or Boston. Not Miami… please!.

Anonymous
1 year ago

“This bricks?”

Anonymous
1 year ago

You’re an idiot. Why not just eliminate all Chinese restaurants from Miami as well since when one thinks of Chinese food Miami doesn’t come to mind. Yeesh. The imbeciles that live in this place! And they are all so confident in their stupidity. That is the new norm in most of the country I suppose.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Okay, let me be confident in my response here to your poorly considered and insulting critique.

So if one thinks that architecture should respond to place that makes them an idiot? Bricks are a building material that was used out of necessity in areas where it made sense and it was the cheapest and best material at the time (100+ years ago in the Northeast, Midwest, etc.). Certain areas (e.g., Baltimore, Boston, etc.) continue to use them in reference to the architectural legacies of those places. So it’s imbecilic to question building a tower that uses a material that has been out dated for 100 years in places thousands of miles from here? Diversity in design should still be based in reason, not a desire to make Miami look like another place just because one likes buildings in the other places. I’m not even saying that the brick shouldn’t be used in any building ever, but questioning them is far from imbecilic. Consider your statement more thoughtfully before lashing out and bashing the people that are invested in considering development in Miami from a place of reason.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Love everything about this tower.

Anonymous
1 year ago

So they’re laying waste to a rare old neoclassical building considered historic enough for the National Register and replacing it with an ugly brown rectangle

Anonymous
1 year ago

My bad, I see the church will be preserved, just overshadowed by the big brick

Anonymous
1 year ago

Yeah.. a “rare old neoclassical building” you never even take time to visit.

Anonymous
1 year ago

It’s a Christian Science church, you’d have to think medicine is religious heresy to visit.

Anonymous
1 year ago

OMG Miami is just like NYC world class

Anonymous
1 year ago

Wake up!.. you’re dreaming again.

Anonymous
1 year ago

So, you haven’t been to New York……

Anonymous
1 year ago

describe world-class to me?

Anonymous
1 year ago
Anonymous
1 year ago

the color does not bother me, the design however is the same crap of everyday.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Your comment to is the typical “same crap of everyday.”

Anonymous
1 year ago

And to think we are so desperate that we agree on some designs in the interest of not seeing an empty parking lot

Anonymous
1 year ago

Nice colors however, design wise it’s pretty bland

Anonymous
1 year ago

I’m not too bothered by the color because it might come out looking nice if it’s of good quality like brownstone, except the chaotic backside is terrible. If it was all lined up, it would parallel the church’s Neoclassical columns, too.

Anonymous
1 year ago

brown stucco? Why not, a more bold color to stand out??

Anonymous
1 year ago

Hide the dirt. Brighter colors have to be cleaned more often if they want to keep curb appeal.

Anonymous
1 year ago

poop

Anonymous
1 year ago

brown is not a color for sunny beautiful Miami….

Anonymous
1 year ago

Chickens walking around in Allapattah are not either but you see them.. along with trashy streets.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Hey, we’ve got chickens in Downtown and Brickell, too!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Yeah.. shows what kind people they let in to this country.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Think what it will look like once Dems take over and open our borders

Anonymous
1 year ago

Yea …. more for Miami in the 70’s

Anonymous
1 year ago

It will stand out in Miami where most buildings aren’t as shit colored

Anonymous
1 year ago

Beats the combination of yellow, blue, read, orange, green, and pink.

Anonymous
1 year ago

At least those are tropical and uplifting