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Enrique Norten Designing Wynwood Office Building For RedSky

Enrique Norten Designing Wynwood Office Building For RedSky

RedSky Capital has submitted plans to build an office building in Wynwood designed by Mexican architect Enrique Norten’s Ten Arquitectos.

The project is to be called Forum, and will be built at 2700 NW 2nd Avenue. It will include:

  • Eight-story building
  • 144,781 square feet of office space
  • 36,072 square feet of commercial/retail
  • 369 parking spaces in an enclosed garage

One warrant and five waivers are being requested, including a 30 percent reduction in parking (506 spaces are required, while 369 are proposed) due to being located with 1/4 mile of a Transit Corridor.

The project requires review by the Wynwood Design Review Committee and the Urban Development Review Board, in addition to review by city staff. A UDRB meeting where the project will be reviewed is scheduled for July 19.

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Anonymous
Anonymous

How refreshing, a 100 % office building with no condo or rental component. A very rare sight in Miami.

A. Nonymous
A. Nonymous

What Transit Corridor? The #9 & #10 buses on NW 2nd?

marc
marc

Did you read “1/4 mile”?

A. Nonymous
A. Nonymous

Yes, I did. NE 2nd is a half mile away.
It was a legitimate question. Does the city consider a two lane street where two local bus lines travel infrequently a transit corridor?

marc
marc

Pretty sure it’s considering the Tri Rail platform the Wynwood Business Improvement district is proposing to pay for or just the rail corridor for that matter.

A. Nonymous
A. Nonymous

Thanks!

Anonymous
Anonymous

NE 2nd. They may be including the jitneys as well. 🙂

Anonymous
Anonymous

You mean trolleys?
We’re not in Manila or Jakarta

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yeah…I think he means jittneys.

Tony Jr Miami Springs
Tony Jr Miami Springs

They do have blue van jitneys in Miami, I think they used to go to Hialeah too – been around forever

Anonymous
Anonymous

No I mean Miami Mini Bus.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Beautiful. I’m loving how Wynwood is being shaped. Great to see office building coming up in the area as well.

Suomynona
Suomynona

“Beautiful”, really?

I’m in favor of projects like these. But that thing is ugly. Looks like some modern brutalist garbage.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Architecture is horrible for this building

Anonymous
Anonymous

agree. minus the color this looks almost exactly like the morris lapidus bank building on lincoln road.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Amazing how a majority here has an opinion about others people criteria of beauty! Stop shaming other people taste

Anonymous
Anonymous

Wow Wynwood would be unrecognizable in ten years.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The employees would be so close to happy hour locations. I could go on a extended lunch to J Wakefield.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Wynwood is just HOT

Anonymous
Anonymous

Miami winning!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Good to see a potential Pritzker Prize winner erecting a building here. http://bit.ly/1iaak4t

Anonymous
Anonymous

Enrique Norten has built a building South Beach. It opened over 5 years ago.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yes, it’s noted in the map link. “Here” implied Wynwood.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Nice design and this would be terrific for Wynwood. Unfortunately, this will never be built.

RedSky is a poorly operated capital group that mismanages current properties and fails at developing future projects. Look up what property they own in miami, you’ll see this group is not good for Wynwood or Miami as a whole.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Hideous design. Was this designed by an architect or a little boy?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Looks appropriate for the new Wynwood, with everything either being a cluttered mess or a boring box like this is.

Anonymous
Anonymous

ugly with bright colors doesn’t make it beautiful

Suomynona
Suomynona

Completely agree. Good project, ugly architecture.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Why can’t we keep office space downtown and keep Wynwood a hip arts district?

I already see it coming, office and residents will move in, rents will skyrocket (as they have already), and Wynwoods charm will fade as it gets sucked into downtown gentrification.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yup. This page kills me sometimes. You’d sacrifice culture, charm, and appeal in order to white wash the place with skyscraper after skyscraper. No one appreciates a city without character. Places like Wynwood give the city character. So go ahead and pave over everything with office space and watch Miami become “just another big city”

Anonymous
Anonymous

You can always move to someplace like “CowPoke Oklahoma” or “Cornrow Nebraska” if you wanna getaway.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I think the point of the argument is about preserving a neighborhood IN miami, so your comment makes no sense.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“Preserving a neighborhood” makes just as little sense. Trying to freeze something in time that is living and constantly morphing like a neighborhood, is about the most futile thing there is.

Neighborhood preservation is a thin veil for nimbyism and does more to drive up prices than anything. Look at San Fran, in trying to keep their charm and not allow new construction (I guess partially to keep prices in check) ends up making the prices go up FAR faster. Now only the super rich can afford to live there. Desirable places will always go up in price and gentrification will always displace some people. They will find other pastures to “pretty up”. It’s kinda the natural evolution of cities.

We should welcome anyone that wants to build buildings that increase the supply of both offices and residences in Wynwood to keep up with demand to live/work/play there.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Again, the comment is opposing OFFICE development, NOT affordable housing. So for second time in a row, your comment makes no sense.

And BTW plenty of cities preserve their districts. Boston preserves the North End, Cambridge preserves Harvard Square, DC preserves Georgetown, LA has its own art district, etc. Only in Miami are people so glutton for meaningless office space. What even are you going to do at this building? Nothing, right?

Former Hoya
Former Hoya

What exactly is there to preserve in Wynwood? Vacant warehouses? Empty lots? A majority of Georgetown’s streets, buildings, and townhomes are hundreds of years old. The area is totally filled in, there isn’t any comparison between Wynwood and Georgetown. Let’s keep in mind that there is a vacant parking lot at this site currently. So what exactly is the objection? Let developers take the risk within the boundaries of the zoning code and if it works out, great, and if not, then we have one less vacant eye sore.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Couldn’t have said it better.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Gee, why is Wynwood one of the post popular destinations for tourists and locals alike? Its not because of office space, so how about I ask you the same question.

Former Hoya
Former Hoya

And how exactly is an office that is a) brand new b) only 8 stories c) aestetically pleasing with a design commensurate with the character of Wynwood going to detract from the tourist and local experience?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Again, the point was regarding the TREND of office space into Wynwood. So yes, one office building won’t remake a neighborhood.

Yet if the trend of office development continues in Wynwood, the area will be redone to look like Brickell or Downtown. I, personally, prefer a unique Wynwood rather than Brickell 2.

Secondly, the city could do more to incentivize the arts scene in Wynwood. Perhaps this lot could be include space for a gallery or something too. I don’t understand all the fervor for office development in Wynwood when the same project could easily be done just a few blocks east.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“A few blocks east, meaning where legitimate historic buildings are rather than blatant NIMBYism? Get outta town! This lot is already vacant anyway.

Anonymous
Anonymous

didnt know Edgewater was Miami’s historic district

Anonymous
Anonymous

It’s not designated, but the pre-war houses arguably are historic of architectural merit, and should receive designated, stat.

Anonymous
Anonymous

designation*

Former Hoya
Former Hoya

https://miami.curbed.com/2015/7/24/9937112/wynwood-neighborhood-revitalization-district-approved

You ought to educate yourself on the zoning code that was passed for the Wynwood neighborhood in 2015. It can never and will never become another Brickell or Downtown…the zoning code won’t allow it.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Gosh you Georgetown kids thing you’re so smart. Again, argument taken out of context. Brickell in the sense of dramatic office development

Former Hoya
Former Hoya

Lol. Georgetown or not, Brickell’s zoning allows for buildings that are 80 stories, and Wynwood allows for buildings that are 8 and located only in particular strips within the neighborhood. So the dramatic office development a la Brickell simply won’t happen. There’s no arguing that. You’re comparisons suck.

The creators of the zoning code were conscious of the need to preserve the character in Wynwood while also allowing new development to include a variety of uses and achieve a bit of density. This building seems like a positive addition to me.

And can we stop claiming that all office space everywhere is created equal? Clearly there is a void to fill for companies who would like to work in the neighborhood of Wynwood, which can’t be replicated. Saying “oh there’s perfectly good office space over in Brickell for companies to work out of instead” is totally ignorant.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“What exactly is there to preserve in Wynwood? Vacant warehouses? Empty lots? ”

This tells me everything I need to know about your knowledge and appreciation for Wynwood. You don’t need 80 story buildings to change a neighborhood, and that is not even what I was arguing. I was saying that rents are already going up, and trends toward office development are going to be a dagger for indie/small scale businesses and galleries which won’t be able to afford the prices.

Oh, and by the way, if you read the code yourself, you would see that the major themes in the code are preservation of those gosh ugly warehouses you hate so much, small development, pedestrianism, commercialism, residential, and parks. Nay, office development isn’t even mentioned in the code. Guess they only teach you about picking up information to advance your own argument at Georgetown?

Anonymous
Anonymous

^^ This post has so many down votes, but is entirely true. If a neighborhood has become a vibrant place and has demand, only development will help keep the demand in check — that’s just simple economics. Having crazy restrictions on development makes the place MUCH more expensive over time (see San Fran, DC, Seattle, and other cities that make it impossible to build anything or have a height/density limit that’s far below where it should be).

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well two points on that.

First, the demand you mentioned would be for the Miami area as a whole. So yes, supply in neighboring downtown, Omni, Brickell would fulfill that demand for office space. Retail space is a different matter.

Second, cities can designate specialities for districts in a city. Doing so would shift the demand you’re speaking about to different areas. This is different from placing restrictions on the whole city. In a concentrated area of a few blocks it wouldn’t affect much. The difference between DC and Miami, for example, is that most prime land in DC has been built up. There are no massive vacant lots in DC, or underdeveloped land like there is in Miami. Overtown for example is prime for development, and yet I don’t see anyone flocking there. Omni is now being developed, too. All are prime locations in Miami.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Office space brings long term jobs, So it should stay a hood where there is purse snatching. I’ve noticed you deadbeats equate culture with enjoying crime and run down buildings. Places like Brickell and Coral Way have character.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yeah, nothing says character like rows of glass buildings housing financial and consulting firms?

You know I’m not talking about crime and drugs. Yes, places like Overtown should be redeveloped, I totally agree.

What I’m talking about in this instance are the beautiful art galleries and local cafes, restaurants, and bars, that will suffer greatly from rising rents.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“local cafes, restaurants, and bars” When has that been unique to Wynwood and show me the rows glass buildings housing financial and consulting firm. There actually not alot of those in Miami and those also provide higher income jobs.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Right, and I’m not opposing the construction of a new cafe or bar, I’m against the trend of offices moving into Wynwood, so once again your comment makes no sense.

And have you driven down Brickell?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yeah, Brickell looks a thousand times better.

In my opinion, the whole Wynwood area should be redone with new highrise office and apartment buildings, restaurants, bars, clubs, and streetscapes.

Now go ahead, downvote me.

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is a vacant lot used for parking. No art gallery is moved in the process of this development.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Cities are made of diversity and urbanization. Wynwood is cute now but it needs form, density and connectivity which cannot happen without projects like these

Anonymous
Anonymous

Because cities evolve and Wynwood is no longer hip artist district. Wynwood is expanding north or 36th St. and west. of I-95

Anonymous
Anonymous

These morons just want everything stay stagnate, they hate the free market.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I don’t see anything wrong with wanting to keep Wynwood an arts district. The comment is not advocating for a halt to new construction in Miami. Just against the trend of office space in Wynwood. We already have one Brickell and Downtown, and we only have one arts district, for now.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well that’s the cycles of gentrification. It happened with SoHo where hipsters who revitalized former factories were replaced by yuppies, and then moved to Williamsburg, where they’re being displaced again. Greener pastures will be found, like Allapattah and Hialeah, and whenever those enter the second cycle, it’ll be Opa-Locka and West Little River, as crazy as it sounds.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Not Hialeah… some things are just too resistant to goodness!

Anonymous
Anonymous

You can buy a mansion in Tampa for the price of a house in Hialeah

Anonymous
Anonymous

love that argument, New York did it so we should too!

Anonymous
Anonymous

I never argued that. It was just an example. I could say the same about many other successful cities.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Perfect quote from a SOFLO real estate article that sums up the argument:

As excited as developers and landlords may be about the potential of the neighborhood, Wynwood Yard founder Della Heiman and Coyo Taco co-founders Sven Vogtland and Alan Drummond also spoke on a small-business roundtable and warned that high rents could kill the vibrancy that has been attracting people to Wynwood. They said that many rents were $40 and $50 per SF and that some landlords were even floating prices as high as $100 per SF.

Changing the neighborhood to an office park is just going to drive these rents up, and we can say bye-bye to the Wynwood we love.

Anonymous
Anonymous

No new development would drive up these rents regardless! You need to have excess space to drive rents down — not a shortage of available space!

A shortage of a product in demand does NOT drive down prices!

Anonymous
Anonymous

In other words, when I exploited the neighborhood 10 years ago, rents were cheap to me, so I put a few dirty bodegas out of business when I improved the area. Now, someone (not me) thinks land is cheap and is doing just what I did, just better, now I’m against that for fear that someone will treat my taco stand like I treated the dirty bodegas.

marc
marc

You’re seeing it a little late.

Miami1
Miami1

Not enough parking…!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Too much parking!!!

Miami1
Miami1

Still not enough parking..