FAA Approves 888 Brickell Supertall

Another Brickell supertall has just been approved by the Federal Aviation Administration.

888 Brickell will be permitted to rise to a supertall height of 1,042 feet above ground level, or 1,049 feet above sea level, according to a letter issued by the agency.

Approval by the FAA was granted on December 9 after around 8 months of review. The application was filed on March 31.

According to an October filing with county planners, 888 Brickell is planned to include:

  • 259 residential units
  • 52,144 square feet of health/fitness
  • 38,727 square feet of food and beverage space
  • approximately 273 parking spaces

Studio Sofield is the building designer, with ODP the architect of record.

JDS Development Group is the developer.

 


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Anonymous
1 month ago

This gives a very NYC vibe. I love it!

Anonymous
1 month ago

Hoping places like this bring more variety of food with them too. We’re not gonna be NYC anytime soon but something other than another Italian place, sushi, or Latin fusion would be nice.

Anonymous
1 month ago

I agree on that. We need traditional food from all around the world, not the fusion version of them. Actual Turkish, Indian, Taiwanese, etc.

Also, we can’t just have fancy food options. In NYC, you have variety of food even in expensive areas. It should be like that here too. I love fancy food but not every single day…

Michael
1 month ago

Why not have both? Yeah, traditional food from China, Ethiopia, Peru, Morocco, Greece, et alia. But, also Miami cuisine i.e., infusion of tropical produce in dishes with Latin and other influences.

Anonymous
1 month ago

We already have the fusion one so what many are asking is for the traditional one too. As an addition, not a substitution.

Anonymous
1 month ago

We need more Lebanese food. There’s a few good ones but Brickell is missing some casual Lebanese or upscale Lebanese like Illili.

NYC Transplant
1 month ago

Amal in Coconut Grove is a winner. Could easily see an Ilili-style restaurant in Brickell.

Brickell Stakeholder
1 month ago

Yes Miami would love to see belly dancers entertain at dinner.

Conno Sir
1 month ago

Lebanese food is delicious and I only know of 1 in the Gables. For sure we lack in International variety.

Anonymous
1 month ago

There is a new Lebanese Food truck in Brickell, call Thyme Machine cafe at 1215 S. Miami Ave.

There used to be Ethiopian restaurants in North Miami Ave. next to Miami design district and another one on the Sunset Harbor area of South Beach. Both places are now closed. They do not had enough customers to be in business. As new people are moving in town things could be different nowadays.

Anonymous
1 month ago

I saw it over the weekend, we all started dancing on the sidewalk to the Arabic music. It was a great vibe. So fun!

Anonymous
1 month ago

We have Chinese food already. Hutong.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Hutong is upscale Chinese from London. Not what we meant by Chinese.

Anonymous
1 month ago

And PF Cheng’s, way better quality than the budget grade stuff in NyC china town

Anonymous
1 month ago

Yes to everything but I don’t think people care for Ethiopian food. I’d rather see Indian, don’t think we have that here yet.

NYC Transplant
1 month ago

Either or both. I can’t see why Ethiopian couldn’t work well here. A nice complement to what’s here currently. If you can enjoy tacos, why not? Indian as well. I’d be shocked if some of the newer projects don’t wind up with some more diverse cuisines represented.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Swagat Indian Kitchen In Park West (downtown) is good

Conno Sir
1 month ago

Try Bombay Corner in the Shenandoah area. They’re great and deliver as well

John
1 month ago

Yes, try Swagat. It’s located on the south side of 900 Biscayne Bay. I haven’t ever been (because I’m not a fan of Indian food) but my friends all rave about it.

Ignatius J Reilly
1 month ago

Who is “we”?

Anonymous
1 month ago

We have every kind of food in Miami. Google it.

Anonymous
1 month ago

You’re talking to people that eat nothing but Latin and Bahamian food and sprinkle in Burger King, McDonalds, Popeye’s Chicken, Churches Chicken, and sometimes pizza everyday.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Are you kidding? You’re obviously not from around here. I am in Brickell and mostly eat health food, gourmet salads, sushi, middle eastern/Mediterranean food.

Anonymous
1 month ago

O’wow!.. he’s in Brickell, just like 2 million other people are.

Ignatius J Reilly
1 month ago

As impressed as you are about his dietary choices and living arrangements, I am impressed with your “educated” guess. Brickell has about 38,000 living in the neighborhood. Not 2 million.

Anonymous
1 month ago

You’re right up not from here. Just moved down from Raleigh, NC in April. But I do live downtown and I come from an area that had a great food scene. Where are the Mexican, Chinese, Indian, Korean, Vietnamese etc restaurants? Sure there are a couple here and there but I had a lot more options in a much smaller market. And as someone else stated I like nice restaurants but I shouldn’t have to be prepare to fork over $150 every time I go out to eat. Especially when a lot of the food around here is mediocre. More variety and more mid tier restaurants would be a huge plus in the downtown/Brickell area. Why would you not want that?

Anon
1 month ago

I’d love to see some Korean and Vietnamese here.

John
1 month ago

Because rents are so high. Korean and Vietnamese restaurants aren’t viable business models in Brickell. What this city needs to do is block off an area to create a Chinatown. Every major city in the U.S. has a Chinatown. Miami is one of the only cities that doesn’t. Wynwood used to be a desolate wasteland, and now look at it. The same can be done with a Chinatown.

Anonymous
1 month ago

NO Chinatown in Miami! It took over little Italy in nyc and ruined a huge portion of downtown Manhattan. We don’t need one here as people assimilate nicely without being segregated based on ethnicity, but thanks! Also there’s a cute china village in coral gables if anyone wants to check it out to appreciate the architecture. That’s better and well maintained than any Chinatown in the US that I’ve seen.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Maybe that is in part why Miami is doing well in comparison, John!

Anonymous
1 month ago

Terrible idea, John! Chinatown ruined lower Manhattan and took over Little Italy. People here don’t need to be segregated by ethnicity because they like to assimilate together.

Ignatius J Reilly
1 month ago

Check out Cantina La Veinte or El Taquito for Mexican.
Sadly, Hy Vong is no longer with us, but it would be great to find some good Vietnamese recommendations. Bombay Darbar is a great Indian place in the Grove and a few other places.

Anonymous
1 month ago

You’ve got to be kidding me. You shouldn’t have to drive to BFE to get good ethnic food. We need more options in the urban core.

Anonymous
1 month ago

It’s actually nice that Brickell has al lot of mainstream food options and a curated ethnic selection.

It’s actually hard finding good food in NYC, it’s just one dollar pizza and Indian and Chinese bodega store fronts one after the next. Everything else may be worth a bite, but overpriced for a small tasting size.

Brickell does need a moderate priced Thai restaurant though with a grand design like in Hell’s Kitchen, NYC

Anon
1 month ago

Go to EST.33 in brickell city center

rosie perez
1 month ago

rents are too high for many food establishments….talk to the developer gods

Anon
1 month ago

Loved you on the View, Rosie.

Ignatius J Reilly
1 month ago

Owners of restaurants calculate the rent that they can afford based on their anticipated sales volume.
If you are selling $41m per year, you can afford Komodo rent. Sexyfish is paying huge numbers with the expectation that they will sell huge numbers.

If the developer charges more rent than and area or restaurantuer can support, then the sits on vacant real estate and looses a lot of money every month until someone the rent becomes appealing.

Sure, rents are too high for a lot of amateurs, but the professional restaurateurs who know what they are doing, do well, and if you are just learning, then try a food truck until you get it right.

Ignatius J Reilly
1 month ago

You don’t NEED it. You WANT it.
Big difference.

NYC Transplant
1 month ago

Yeah, but a lot of it is still kindof perfunctory, especially in the urban core.

lewis mumford for the mods
1 month ago

rents are too high for many ethnic restaurants…increases in civility and charm are often to the detriment of culture

Anonymous
1 month ago

” something other than another italian place,sushi, or latin fusion would be nice” we need more places that sell hot dogs and pinchos

Anon
1 month ago

We need more casual spots with good food, even people who have money don’t want to spend so much every single time they go out to eat.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Welcome to Manhattan south!

Jay
1 month ago

These are condos for elites, no jobs here, Manhatten buildings have business , jobs and culture.

NY/Miami Leader
1 month ago

Everyone is working remote here, and HQ are locating here in droves. Nobody wants to go to the offices in NYC. We have jobs culture and condos for everyone all throughout Miami.

Ignatius J Reilly
1 month ago

Quick Jay!
Go tell the developer! Stop him before he goes too far!!!

Let him know that people who can’t even spell Manhattan are certain that there are no jobs or culture in Brickell. Clearly, the man who is putting his money where his mouth is, could benefit from your advice and intellect! (wait…if he paid you for your advice on this building…wouldn’t that be a job?)

Nevermind.

Vincent
1 month ago

This will be a game changer for Brickell. It can be the neighborhood’s first supertall.

Brickell Stakeholder
1 month ago

As well as epically designed low/mid rise high rises mixed in for upscale city living We want to keep Beickell developing nicely with well designed residential areas too. Too many supertalls clustered together without any consideration of impact on quality of life for residents increases risk of urban blithe and desertion.

SoLo
1 month ago

People can argue about the design, but this building should be more dense.

Pleezzee
1 month ago

“Too many supertalls clustered together without any consideration of impact on quality of life for residents increases risk of urban blithe and desertion”

Well i guess those “supertall buildings” in Tokyo is the reason for urban blithe and desertion there then?

Cut it out with the “scary scenario” because Miami has enough developable and redevelopable land to accommodate at least15 more supertalls.

Anonymous
1 month ago

People here don’t like to go to Asian cities because they are too dense, loud, busy, and smell bad. Don’t try to make this the same as there. We can have a dense city with strategically placed super talls and height diversity among lower rise dense buildings, stagger the skyline to accommodate more units with views and eliminate turning it into a urban ghetto.

Pleezzee
1 month ago

Haha.. I never said Miami should be like another Asian city.. I said – “Well i guess those “supertall buildings” in Tokyo is the reason for urban blithe and desertion there then?” Brickell stakeholder said – “Too many supertalls clustered together without any consideration of impact on quality of life for residents increases risk of urban blithe and desertion.”

Now, does Supertall Buildings increase the risk of urban blither and desertion in Tokyo or will the increase in the millions of people there and/or the increase the millions of people who come there cause or is causing it?

NYC Transplant
1 month ago

Is there actually a way to make sure the supertalls are “strategically placed?” I mostly walk around Brickell and Downtown, so not often stuck in traffic. Still, I do not believe that Miami has the transportation capacity to handle it well. The major north/south streets in Miami have nowhere near the width that Manhattan Avenues do. This will lead to some real logjams, and towers that are spaced more like lower Manhattan than Midtown.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Plenty of room for super talls in central downtown, maybe one or two in Brickell which are already in development, rest of Brickell should be unified plan high/mid/low dense developments.

RenRich
1 month ago

Miami’s very busy and very loud.

Ignatius J Reilly
1 month ago

I love going to Asian cities when I have the time.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Tokyo has no supertalls and probably one of the cleanest cities in the world relative to its size. You can’t really compare Japanese, Singapore, and South Korean cities to an extent, to other Asian cities.

Brickell Stakeholder
1 month ago

With new projects like this, Brickell will be even more ultra-luxurious and world class. Every street in Brickell, from I95 to Biscayne Bay, will soon be elevated to create the ultimate walkable lifestyle and upscale city neighborhood within Miami.

Rob
1 month ago

I don’t know about this one. Very excited about the design, very different for miami, but I fear it won’t end up like the renderings. Hopefully I am wrong.

Anonymous
1 month ago

“I fear”

I guess that means he’ll be very disappointed like he does with a lot of things frequently in life… but just those things, he’ll get over them.

Vincent
1 month ago

I hope there will be plenty of retail space on the ground floor.

Anonymous
1 month ago

It doesn’t appear to be the case looking at the auto court along the Southeast 10th Street Side, and maybe an upscale restaurant on the Brickell Avenue side. With BCC down the street, I don’t even believe retail to be necessary for this tower, and especially considering how underutilized a lot of Brickell’s ground-floor retail space is.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Retail and services are necessary for every new building in Brickell. There needs to be a flow and the area lacks many retail and services that people need without getting in a car.

Not Anonymous
1 month ago

Great Design. Reminds me of the mid-century gothic of NY as well as the Art Deco of the Beach. Will definitely change the Skyline and look good in postcards!!

Anonymous
1 month ago

Gothic NYC is hideous and NYC is stuck with it unfortunately. Glad we are getting a better new version of that!

Anonymous
1 month ago

Miami looks better with rounded flowing organic shapes in high rises, not the old NYC block look that sends people packing their bags to get out. A few could be cool in Miami but don’t lose the Miami identity, Art Deco and streamline modern are the gold standard.

Anonymous
1 month ago

I think it has more to do with socioeconomic factors rather than buildings. Rather take Gothic over an Arquitectonica box.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Um, gothic skyscrapers were from the 1890s until about 1920s when Art Deco took over. The most prominent building is the Woolworth Building, completed in 1914. Mid-century was International Style.

Brickell Stakeholder
1 month ago

Beautiful design! This is just the right amount of gold for the façade of a high rise. Any more gold would be over kill. Glad the designers/developers took my tip of of adding a touch of gold. The stonework is magnificent and can be enhanced a bit more to stand out from the gold.

Gold
1 month ago

Gold Gold Gold

Anonymous
1 month ago

Would be cool to see a building literally dripping in gold like wax shape. I had a vision of a candle shaped building recently with a giant lit “flame” on top, could be cool in developing part of Brickell.

garish gold toilets.
1 month ago

sway baby sway in those tropical force winds!!!!

Hilarious!
1 month ago

Hey.. a cow of yours got out of the fence again…

bob
1 month ago

LOVE LOVE – GREAT GREAT. Build it

Magazinee
1 month ago

The renderings look like design of much more than 259 residential units. And 55,000 sq/ft of gym space? That’s INSANE. Even if there are multiple commercial fitness / health facilities, that is a crazy number. If average square footage of apartments are 1,000 sq ft, that’s a 4:1 apartment to gym space. Pretty crazy.

Anonymous
1 month ago

I heard residents will be allowed to slam weights down and won’t have to wipe down the equipment after use. Grunting sounds will be piped in overhead through hi-fi speakers.

Zz01
1 month ago

Haha?

Miami Fan
1 month ago

Just waiting for Miami’s “first” super tall building to actually be built! Hard to believe that with the nation’s third tallest skyline, we don’t have one of these super talls yet.

330
1 month ago

We need density. Two-hundred and sixty apartments for a thousand foot tall skyscraper seems overkill. I get that market demand has allowed such billionaire skyscrapers to be viable, but these types of projects are not going to get us into that global tier.

Anonymous
1 month ago

What get us into that global tier is setting trend for spacious floor plans where people want to live. Not micro units that people want to flee.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Best building I’ve seen proposed here. Simple and sleek instead of all those BS rounded corners, balconied adorned (even if an office building) indicators of some architects trying too hard to be unique. Like guadily overdressed newcomers to a scene. You don’t have to stack apple shaped boxes on top of pare shaped ones to create some rediculous pretense of innovative design.

Design Pro
1 month ago

Actually you do need to incorporate shape and creative outdoor space. Vertical minimalism is uninviting and looks like corporate prisons.

Original
1 month ago

Now bring a lot of high and midrise construction like this north by northeast and northwest of 395.

Need to go higher
1 month ago

How many supertalls are in the works now? I wish the FAA would allow some portion of Miami to go higher. Geez how much space do planes need. NYC is surrounded by 3 airports and they’ve figured it out.

Anonymous
1 month ago

They should re-route planes in order to allow for building higher.

Anonymous
1 month ago

They are already building high! This is a non issue. There’s plenty of space to develop dense and tall from downtown to design district. This city doesn’t want to be completely vertical nor is that sustainable or desirable, Miami has the perfect balance.

Pleezzee
1 month ago

“This city doesn’t want to be completely vertical”

Again, somebody who knows what this city wants.

“This city doesn’t want to be completely vertical”

Look, Miami has a long, long, longggg way to go before it began to get to that status. He’s referring to the ridiculous height limit the city let the FAA impose.

Anne A.
1 month ago

Yeah, NY did figure it out. They have their biggest airport near the ocean, an hour away, in Jamaica, Queens. The second is in another state. And the smallest, LGA, is newly gorgeous but handles only smaller, more maneuverable planes because of the crazy landing/takeoff acrobatics demanded of pilots to avoid tall buildings (!!!) and minimize noise related litigation the Port Authority has been dealing with for decades.

To your point, the FAA could, I feel, be more proactive in communicating needs/options for when Miami outgrows it’s population of 500k, the superb convenience of MIA’s location and MIA’s limitations with those east/west runways.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Yeah You sure NYC got it right? Half the population just left. It takes hours to get to the airports, stuck in traffic, in a smelly car with pollution and labyrinth of wires and cables graffiti along the main exits/entrances. When the pandemic hit, people felt stuck.

The waters there are polluted and rats are floating (literally saw a floating rat when I thought it would be fun to sail on a four man vessel in the Hudson River), not like here (hopefully not ever). Miami should not model our new and valuable city after New York, but rather aspire to be a better version and learn from those mistakes.

Find the right balance of density that doesn’t turn the city into a garbage filled noise trap, but is inviting to commerce and pedestrians. That is the way to go!

Anonymous
1 month ago

NYC should never be the model. Beaches are ugly, airports are too far and city is too dense.

Pleezzee
1 month ago

There you go with the “Scare Tactics” again. Whose talking about modeling after NYC?

Design Pro
1 month ago

Anna A said to model building height and air traffic after NYC, which is wrong.

Who doesn’t like a taller skyline?
1 month ago

Exactly, the comment was just saying why can’t we increase building heights like they have in NYC. We should be able to work with the FAA to allow taller buildings. That’s all I was saying.

lurch
1 month ago

what was the tower that sways in nyc???

Design Pro
1 month ago

Most of the supertalls, especially those thin nose hair billionaire row buildings that arbitrarily chopped the high line just to give the city an all new unattainable height to look up at but never see in person.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Brickell is being rebuilt, they are tearing down the old buildings and parking lots on west Brickell and Btickell ave, the waterfront is next

Anonymous
1 month ago

There is no such place as “west Brickell”. The area on Second Ave is simply Brickell, and right next to the Underline core of Brickell, very valuable and developing with ultra lux buildings that have easy access to I95 without traffic or flooded streets.

Anonymous
1 month ago

The small developing neighborhood west of I-95 is sometimes referred to as “west Brickell” because it is being modeled after Brickell, but the area with lots being redeveloped is just Brickell.

Anonymous
1 month ago

“Modeled after Brickell.” What?