FAA Approves One Brickell City Centre, Will Become One Of The Tallest In The U.S.

The Federal Aviation Administration has finally approved the 80-story height of One Brickell City Centre, which is now set to become one of the tallest buildings in the country.

Federal officials granted the authority for developer Swire Properties to build up to a height of 1,040 feet above ground level, or 1,049 feet above sea level. After studying the proposal for 20 months, the agency decided that it wouldn’t pose a threat to air traffic.

The project is envisioned as the Brickell Avenue gateway to the under-construction Brickell City Centre complex. The new tower will include a mix of retail space, class A offices, condominiums, and a five-star hotel. A grand plaza and retail shops will be located at the ground level, connected to the first phase of Brickell City Centre by Climate Ribbon. On the top of the tower, a lounge and restaurant will be open to the public.

When completed, the tower will become the the tallest in the U.S. outside of New York or Chicago.

 

 

Tallest buildings under construction in the U.S. outside of New York:

  • Salesforce Tower, San Francisco (992 feet to roof)
  • Wilshire Grand Tower, Los Angeles (934 feet to roof)
  • Comcast Innovation and Technology Center, Philadelphia (911 feet to roof)

 

 

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Anonymous

Our first 1000 footer!! Aaaaah!

Jz

Nice stats on the other under construction supertalls. Glad we edged them out. Hope this breaks ground soon.

Anonymous

Actually the other 3 towers will in fact be taller than this with their respective spires/architectural designs at the top. We don’t know that the actual roof of this building will be at 1040′, that could be the very top of the architectural design as well. 1040′ is just the absolute limit the FAA will allow.

Anonymous

It’s not a super tall

marc

Any building over 980′ is a supertall.

Anonymous

of course its approved…was never a threat to begin with..now lets hope we don’t have to wait 10 years for completion…it will be a landmark!

Anonymous

All this talk about Miami becoming the true world class city that it can be. But if you look at cities like NYC, Boston, DC, Berlin, London, Chicago, etc. they all have transportation that can get them to all major points in the area. I tried using mass transit to get from Brickell to the Design District- a perfectly logical trip from a residential area to a shopping and dining area that will be frequented by residents on evenings often. Driving, the trip takes 15 minutes; with the mass transit we have in place, it takes 40 minutes.

Its great we have these buildings going up, and I love the city and all the potential that it has. But with the current traffic system and the cities’ lack of response to the problem, our city won’t be as “world class” as it can be- and it would be a real shame to spoil Miami over a solvable problem like this…

Fredric

Granted, that is presently an issue and the local, state and federal governments have all been dragging their feet on the issue of adequate public transportation for decades now. However, and as others have already stated, the pressure is rapidly building now within the community to make real changes and significant improvements with regard to public transit, so the politicians have no choice but to act and soon.

In fact, vast improvements in the transportation capacity are absolutely inevitable in this community now and so it will get done, eventually. All those cities you mentioned once had less-than-adequate public transportation, a long time ago. But all of that is now forgotten as those cities have also been mature population centers for ages now, unlike Miami which is still early on in its growth and transformation curve.

Lady Susu

Uber is the only vast improvement in transportation in Miami!

Marc305

@Lady Susu, I could not agree with you more. I recently used it and was very pleased with the service, much better than taxis!

Lady Susu

Can’t dig down for a subway…only option is some modification to metro rail/busway and even that is dicey. Eminent domain along I-95 corridor for rail extension? Doubtful. Too many businesses and low income housing, the inhabitants of which have already been dislocated when 95 was built. This was a Known problem thirty years ago and the only brilliant idea was a few miles of elevated rail.

Anonymous

What do you mean you can’t dig down? Of course you can but it will be more expensive. Look at Amsterdam and Copenhagen. The fastest and cheapest solution would be BRT like Bogota.

Anonymous

I really think people dont understand how complex and costly it will be to get it done. You cant just snap your fingers and its done it will take time. But I also feel Miami is growing at a rapid pace so they have to really think of a master plan. You can imagine when they do figure it out just how long it will take from all the negotiating, approvals, planning then breaking ground to finishing the project could take 10 years before its actually done.

Anonymous

Try Uber next time.

Danny Costa

Wooohoooo!!!!!!!!!! This is one of the best moments in Miami history!!!!!!!

MrDreTheOne

Amazing news! And knowing Swire, they will get right to it on schedule and on budget.

Anonymous

“After studying the proposal for 20 months, the agency decided that it wouldn’t pose a threat to air traffic.”

Again, how can buildings pose a threat to air traffic?….buildings don’t MOVE! What goes up in the air poses a threat to what’s on the ground. Buildings on the gound are always under a constant threat of a plane malfunctioning and falling out of the sky!

marc

Is that you Obviously?

Anonymous

Very astute of you marc. It’s been so cool being anonymous. Everytime I look around, people want to change comment formats somewhere. I just decided “the heck with it” reply anonymous.

Anonymous

Now its time for Miami’s leaders to get serious about the traffic problem. Ground traffic that is,

Anonymous

The more the Miami Metropolitan Planning Org, hears from the people- the more they’ll get on board. Get your voices heard, since they obviously can’t see the growing traffic problems outside their windows!! http://www.dot.state.fl.us/publicinformationoffice/moreDOT/districts/dist6.shtm
http://miamidadempo.org/contact-us.asp

Anonymous

heard today during a tour of Brickell Citycentre that 450,000 out of the 500,000 sft of the mall have already been leased.

also that on July 4th Swire will be announcing 2 MAJOR tenants!!

exciting news!!!!!!!!!

John

Sounds like you work for the developer5

Anonymous

Yes!

Anonymous

I’m completely sure that building will survive a “hurricane Andrew” type event without any difficulty. Andrew was a bit down on power and was only able to rip out concrete phone poles and re-position them 2 miles… Andrew’s peak wind velocity was never measured, at the National Hurricane Center gusts to 164 mph (264 km/h) were measured before the anemometer failed. 63,000 homes were destroyed by wind damage.

Anonymous

“After studying the proposal for 20 months,”

If taxpayers paid for this study, boy did we get fleeced.

AnonymouS

Who else could possibly pay for it ?

paloma

20 Months. 20 Months of 5 day work weeks ?..and paid holidays ….what’s that? 400 working days on paper …400 days of government meetings at 8 hours a day pay rate?…while only meeting for 2. Just for one building?? ..3200 hours of pay for surely a contingent of contract scientists, retired pilots, military specialists, municipal partners, politicians? What? To analyze the approach path to Miami International Airport on the other side of the city?? Do they think it was going to jump up and down on a big spring? And you wonder why the country is $20Trillion in hock!!. We all deserve to be bankrupted. What an outrageous misuse of public funds.

Marc305

You took the words right out of my mouth Paloma, it took 20 months for these people to do exactly what? Just re-rout the planes if you are so worried about them hitting a building. Outside of small plane hitting the Empire State building in 1945 and 9-11 when has a plane hit a skyscraper in the USA?

Anonymous

When that idiot delibertly crashed that Crop Duster into that building in Tampa.

Marc305

Tampa was deliberate, as was 9-11, so far the only accident happened in 1945! That is what all these studies are for?? Seriously??

Anonymous

C’mon guys with this hurricane talk. Firstly, no tower has ever been brought down by wind alone. There have been typhoons that struck Tokyo and pervious hurricanes that have struck Houston and Miami alike. No towers have come down. There’s a building code in place, and structural engineers are called to help design and construct the building. They know Miami is a hurricane danger zone, and they build structures accordingly. Skyscrapers are built with shatter resistant glass, and are required to be able to withstand wind 175mph+. For reference, Andrew was 165mph when it stuck the coast. The big problem is storm surge, and Rick Scott just denied funding to many south florida communities for improved storm drainage and such– not good.

Anonymous

Great news for Miami and for Brickell. Miami is really becoming one of the nicest and most exciting cities in the world.

Sentient

That may be a bit much.

Really???

In the end I don’t think the restrictions really amount to anything. Sure, maybe in a couple hundred years when Miami is all built out and there simply isn’t anywhere else to go but as of right now I don’t think a couple buildings being a couple hundred feet shorter does anything but help a few skyscraper enthusiast get their rocks off about something that 99.99% of regular people don’t care about.

Which by the way has been part of Miami’s problem. We build up instead of out and have a bunch of neighborhoods that haven’t been connected. Not to say we don’t need skyscrapers, but we were building skyscrapers 50 years ago that are basically surrounded by vacant land that is still vacant today and were only now starting to scratch the surface of filling in the gaps.

Anonymous

i honestly believe thats one of the biggest problems in miami is its not really connected like other cities New york or say Chicago its like all these communities are doing their own thing

Fredric

I must say I am a little bit confused by your comment. You make it sound as if there is a lot of vacant land to be built upon in Miami but that in fact is not the case. If you are talking about the scattered vacant lots in and around downtown, those are mostly all owned either by investment firms or they have been and are being snapped up by developers and will soon be built upon. If you are talking about the area in general, Miami-Dade county is nearly built out by now, with the exception of a lot of land where building is strictly prohibited, such as beyond the urban development boundary in West Miami-Dade and the land in the Redlands area that is all currently in agricultural use. The latter can only be converted to commercial or residential use over time but then that reduces the vital farmland coverage which provides a wide range of agricultural products to fulfill the needs of South Florida residents and is also vital to the local economy. The farmland also cannot be expanded due to strict environmental and water conversation needs in the Everglades region. Broward County to the north… Read more »

Lady Susu

That and Agenda 21, the UN’s ‘voluntary’ sustainable development plan to push the populace into dense, urban areas where they will by necessity have to use public transportation (can’t have all those cars clogging the air and streets). In fact, many metro areas around the country are on board with this plan, including Miami. They have some nice sounding plans like more Green Ways and connected bike routes, etc., just to get the public on board, but the long-term goal is to cram the masses into dense cities where they can be constrained from using up/polluting the land, which of course, needs to be under the stewardship of the ruling elites and conservancy NGOs. It’s all a lead up to Global Governance which is chugging right along unbeknownst to most.

“Land…cannot be treated as an ordinary asset, controlled by individuals and subject to the pressures and inefficiencies of the market. Private land ownership is also a principal instrument of accumulation and concentration of wealth, therefore contributes to social injustice.” From the report from the 1976 UN’s Habitat I Conference.

PS. The skyscraper technique was mastered in Chicago after the Great Fire.

Richter

uwotm8?

The last thing Miami needs is more sprawl. Miami should use the examples of LA and Atlanta’s sprawl and traffic hell as an example of exactly what not to do. Some might argue that we’ve already gone much too far on the path.

What we need is more density in the city’s core, and more connectivity to the outlying areas to deal with the present and future growth of the city. Paving over more lands out west will accomplish nothing beyond adding more burden on the already strained highways, killing off more nature, and ruining the appeal of the existing fringe communities like Homestead and The Redlands.

Building up IS filling the gaps (look at brickell today vs years ago, how MWC could transform that collection of empty lots, etc). And it is a much more promising trend than mindlessly building out rows of mcmansions and strip malls out west.

E. Lagomorph

Looks suspiciously similar to the Umbrella logo…

Anonymous

Will it be visible from Cuba?

Anonymous

Is it just me, or is this building kind of boring and ugly? I’m happy to see it approved, but I wish it had a more interesting design.

Anonymous

The design feat is developing this high…aesthetic designs are a little more limited with supertalls, so try to see the beauty in the engineering and technological progress making them possible.

Anonymous

Playing Devil’s Advocate, this will be only 3 feet taller than the Chrysler Building, which is one of the most beautiful in the world in my opinion, and that was finished in 1930.

I like the design of 1BCC okay, but let’s not use height as an excuse for underwhelming design!

Anonymous

i agree because google towers that are the tallest in the world and you will see that height has nothing to do with it. but i notice only american buildings are mostly boring compared to china, dubai and other countries.

Anonymous

Chrysler tower is a genuine centerfold. I just watched a docu about migrant Nepali construction workers building the stadiums for World Cup 2022 in Qatar (they’re dying by the thousands btw). Wow what a pile of garbage that skyline is. It looks like a bad acid trip. In one of the most conservative religious countries in the world they managed to ‘erect’ the largest dildo in human history.
http://www,arcspace.com/the-camera/photo-report-from-doha/

Anonymous

To that end, the pyramids are kind of “boring,” but people see the monumental progress they represent. Just go to Milan or something if you only want pretty design.

Anonymous

Relax! We don’t need a mess of a skyline ! Uniformity looks classy

Anonymous

after studying proposal 20 months it wont pose hazard to air traffic – It took less time to build the empire state building

Anonymous

If it wasnt for this FAA crap who knows how tall or how many over 1,000ft buildings would be in Miami right now but because of that many developers dont want to go through the trouble and just to please them build under 800ft but this and a few other proposed buildings will be over 1000ft

Anonymous

This is great. Opens up opportunities for more 900-1000 feet tall buildings in Brickell and hopefully Downtown Miami

Afi

Best thing that’s ever happen to miami in years.

marc

Luckily we have Swire behind this project.

Fredric

I do hope that Swire will start construction on this project quickly. Hopefully, the expanding need for Class A office space in downtown Miami as well as the thriving travel industry locally will propel this project. The residential aspect for this building will not be advantageous in the short term because that market is, predictably, now slowing. On the other hand, since it would be the tallest building in Miami, there may still be a niche in the luxury residential market that is based on that one selling point. We shall soon see what happens with this.

marc

There’s also the hotel aspect of this tower as well as a sightseeing observation deck.

C. N. Mynett

How much money did the study cost ?

Anonymous

Put it this way. At $1000 a month times 20 months, that’s $20,000 dollars. In Miami, the way they can throw around tax dollars, can you imagine it being that cheap?

CallMe

If you throw a mango off the roof, how long before it plops into Biscayne Bay?

John E. Bravo

Hate to break it to the contractors, but it looks like some jerk stole a big chunk out of their building.

ArchiMage

Cool that we’d get a super-tall building, but the design of the building is quite uninspiring and dull. It may yet get updated designs as they do right before the base is poured. I want something more than a typical box (with a cut out of it–losing sq footage in the process). lets hope it takes off fast! Should be awesome to see the skyline with that beast!

Richard

Hmm, supposedly the “Comcast Innovation and Technology Center is a skyscraper under construction in Philadelphia.[1] The 59 floor building, with a height of 1,121 feet (342 m), will be the eighth-tallest building in the U.S., and the tallest building in the U.S. outside of Manhattan and Chicago.”

Jason

It’s a handsome tower, and nice to see Miami finally being allowed to break the 1000-foot mark. But having the highest roof height (which is what the article quoted for Philly, LA, and SF’s under-construction towers) isn’t going to put this building at the top of the official tallest buildings list. Many people don’t like counting spires (or in Philly’s case, a pretty substantial boxed lantern acting as a blunt blade) – but the fact is that the most widely-accepted first and foremost method of calculating building heights is to count architectural features. So as it stands, Miami is going to have the 4th tallest building in the US outside of NYC/Chicago: Philadelphia 1,121′ Los Angeles 1,100′ San Francisco 1,070′ Miami 1,040′ San Francisco’s will actually “look” tallest, because its section above the roof is even more substantial than Philly’s, and the solid facade will continue fully up past the roof, right to the 1,070′ mark. Most people won’t even realize that the top of the crown isn’t the roof. Miamians need not fret, though: what Miami’s skyline may lack in absolute height (thanks to the FAA) is more than made up for in sheer quantity of tall buildings. If… Read more »

marc

Miami is 3rd in the US in terms skyline size.