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FAA: One Brickell City Centre Will Interfere With MIA Flight Rules

FAA: One Brickell City Centre Will Interfere With MIA Flight Rules

Swire Properties received a Notice of Presumed Hazard letter from the FAA last week for One Brickell City Centre.

After ten months of study, the FAA’s preliminary determination is that the tower’s proposed height of 1,040 feet above ground level and 1,049 above sea level (reduced from a previous request of 1,102 feet above ground) would alter required flight altitudes at MIA.

If Swire decides to continue to pursue the 1,040 foot height, the developer faces an uphill battle. FAA officials tell exMiami that flight altitudes at airports are ‘protected like gold’, as once they are lost they cannot be regained. Swire has 60 days to respond to the notice, but still had not contacted the FAA as of this morning.

The FAA also issued two other Notice of Presumed Hazard letters last week, for the 570-foot Brickell Heights and the 554-foot Brickell Bayview Center. However, those buildings haven’t been determined to have an affect on flight altitudes at MIA, and are more likely to be approved after further study.

FAA officials are also continuing to study Tibor Hollo’s One Bayfront Plaza, proposed to be built at 1,005 feet. Hollo submitted those plans last December, and no determination has been issued yet.

If Swire does manage to gain approval at 1,040 feet, One Brickell City Centre would become the tallest building in the U.S. outside of New York or Chicago. Other towers are currently under construction in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Philadelphia that exceed the 1,000 foot mark using spires or other ornamental features, but have a roof line that is below 1,000 feet.

 

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Peter
Peter

Solution: Fill out the floor plates in the middle and take off a few floors at the top.

Fred G
Fred G

Here we go again. A developer wants to build a super tall building in downtown Miami and the FAA steps in and tells them they cannot do it. It is pretty clear that the FAA is just throwing their weight around because up until now, the various authorities involved from the city of Miami, Miami-Date Metro government, developers and the DDA have just given in to all of the FAAs demands. Enough is enough. Planes are not going to crash into a building in Brickell if it is 1040 feet in height but if it is chopped down to, say, 900 feet then everything is just A-O-K and no planes will be the least bit troubled. These “flight rules” are like most everything else in this world. They are what they are because someone dreamed them up inside of their heads, they are NOT based upon solid, objective data, information or factual evidence. And further, the pattern seems to be clear in Miami. If a developer proposes to build a tower to 850 feet then the FAA demands that they chop it down to 750 feet. If it is proposed from the outset at 750′ then the FAA says it… Read more »

XVS
XVS

Useless bureaucrats need to show that they are hard at work. Do we have a damn senator in DC, or Marco Rubio is too busy to defend his city?

Peter
Peter

Skyscrapers predated jet aviation in New York.

Airports and flight paths were constructed with them in mind.

thomas
thomas

PHL is a lot farther than five miles from Center City Philadelphia, thus no height restrictions there. Not the best example.

MiaPhl
MiaPhl

PHL is a linear distance of 6 miles from Center City. Not that much farther than the above guess. Seems more distant on the ground.

anonymous
anonymous

PHL runways do not take planes over downtown.

kat
kat

well said!! if Miami doesn’t fight back, they will’ keep bullying, shame on FAA

global reach
global reach

The FAA complains about the growing Miami skyline, while Downtown San Diego is building more high rises that actually come within less then 100 feet to some buildings. Those planes going to and coming from MIA are not coming close to the Miami skyline.

Kristian Toimil
Kristian Toimil

This is the second time someone mentions San Diego and their apparent lack of height restrictions. The FAA limits the height in San Diego to 500 feet; I’m not sure what you’re talking about…

anonymous
anonymous

Shh…. facts are not allowed in the Miami height debate.

Paul
Paul

Panorama Towers tallest crane will reach over 1,050 feet and One Brickell City Centre can’t reach 1,040 are you kidding me?

Daniel
Daniel

The FAA in this sense is complete bullshit. Screw the FAA for constantly bullying the growth of the downtown skyline

Obviously
Obviously

The FAA does not have the authority to tell the city of Miami at what height they can and can’t build highrises. Airports exist in cities only through the authority given by a city’s government. That is why when a developer submits a proposal for a highrise, the proposal goes through the approval process first by the governing board of the city of Miami, not the Miami International Airport and the FAA. The FAA can only recommend, and the city can either abide by it, or ignore it and give the developer the go ahead to build at the height they requested. Remember, Fort Lauderdale Int Airport is only about a twenty five or less mile freeway drive from the MIA. Even if the MIA ceases operation you could still get to Miami fairly quickly from FLL. So the Miami International Airport or the FAA doesn’t really have the power to push around and bully the city of Miami, Miami has power to call it’s own shots.

Kristian Toimil
Kristian Toimil

It’s a very interesting issue. Does the FAA have the authority? The Federal Gov’t trumps State Gov’t, so it certainly also trumps City Gov’t. The FAA is an agency of the DOT, which is under the Executive Branch of the Federal Gov’t.

I think a serious case can be made that the City has some ability to appeal the decision, and certainly, that is what we have congressmen and women for.

And the idea of MIA closing shop is just ridiculous. It employs 250K+ and has an economic impact of $30B+ (to be fair, these figures come from MIA, though I haven’t seen anyone challenge it with data of their own).

Anonymous
Anonymous

FAA regulation trumps all local regulations. Period.

Afi K. James
Afi K. James

Fuck the FAA, it’s time for them to be abolished period, this is the same one who is putting drones into the skies, shame on them.

Seth Gordon
Seth Gordon

Building height limits are not enforced by the FAA or any other unit of government. They are enforced by the private sector insurance companies called upon to insure the building. And insurance companies generally WILL NOT insure a building that exceeds a (recommended) FAA height limit.

Steven H
Steven H

MIA is a much more important economic engine than a building being 100 fee taller. You don’t want to mess with FAA flight paths. If the FAA does not approve Miami and MDC won’t too. Get real guys. Enough of think crazy talk about screwing the FAA. MIA is vital to Miami.

Javz
Javz

I suppose a line in the sky has to be drawn but where is it? Everytime we get bad FAA news, it seems ambiguous and arbitrary.

Anonymous
Anonymous

what ever happened with the agreement between the county ,MIA and Miami . the limit was 1000 ft, if the FAA now insist on not honoring that then the feds and the county should redirect the runways which can be done with out leaving the footprint of the airport

marc
marc

Not sure if i remember this correctly but i read somewhere that something as small as a 2 or 3 degree shift of the runways would alleviate issues with the flight paths and tower heights.

Daniel
Daniel

We should all start a petition to redirect the runways by a couple of degrees to change height restrictions.

Dan
Dan

Let’s do it!!!

Obviously
Obviously

We also need to make the FAA explain to us why is it that that ugly gigantic toenail clipper called “Skyrise” at a height of 1000ft isn’t an interference on flight rules but Brickell One at a measly 49ft higher is?

Obviously
Obviously

FAA doesn’t directly restrict the height of buildings, but issues a “determination of hazard” when buildings are too tall near airports. At that point, local zoning boards are reluctant to approve construction, and buildings can become unaffordable because of higher insurance costs and smaller size.

Anon
Anon

Why does everyone seem to care so much about what height the buildings are in Miami, and by everybody I mean people on message boards?