Foundation Permit Applied For At Namdar Towers

A construction permit application was filed this week for the Namdar Towers site in downtown Miami.

According to the November 27 permit filing, approximately $1.5 million worth of work is planned under the excavation/piles/site and soil improvement category.

A separate non-structural site work permit was approved for the property in September.

A demolition permit to clear the site is also moving through the approval process.

In addition, a permit for full vertical construction is also in review.

John Moriarty is listed as the contractor on all of the permits.

Miami’s UDRB voted in October to recommend approval of the project.

According to the UDRB filing, Namdar’s towers are both planned to rise 43 stories (around 448 feet above ground when including a design feature at the top), with:

  • 1,394 residential units
  • two amenity levels, including pools, fitness, bowling rooms, golf simulators, and co-working space
  • 7,984 square feet of ground floor commercial space
  • 336 parking spaces in a five-level garage, including EV chargers. A wind-driven kinetic screen in polished aluminum will mask the garage.
  • 1,395 bicycle racks

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Anon
2 months ago

These are a really exciting addition to downtown. This whole area is on fire. That fluttering kinetic facade is awesome.

Robin Stan
2 months ago

That facade does work well on 830 Brickell, this one looks very similar.

BB1
2 months ago

I still love that little building holding out. Adds character and a story to the site.

Urbanist
2 months ago

This is their last chance to sell in order to have a viable chance of getting anywhere near market value.

That hotel is decrepit and I’m guessing the next 10 year recertification will require yet more costly upgrades.

All of their rooms are going to have a wonderful view of a parking garage.

Anonymous
2 months ago

They had a wonderful view of parking lots before that. Time will tell if holding out was the right move.

Melo is sigma and Chad
2 months ago

the hotel is actually not that bad

Anonymous
2 months ago

It’ll be cool if they sold, and the buyer restores it to its original 1920s appearance when it was the “Pershing Hotel.” Downtown Miami needs more boutique hotels, and adaptive reuse of underutilized prewar mid and high-rises will work beautifully.

Anonymous
2 months ago

There’s a block of old prewar buildings that look like nyc – would be cool to restore some of those

Anonymous
2 months ago

It’s a dump with a terrible history. They should’ve sold like the old man in the Plaza in the Gables. Ridiculous.

Free Idea Guy
2 months ago

If you’re going to develop a rectangular design, this is how you do it! Notice it’s not fully rectangular. The rectangular design is offset by the L-shape layout of the two buildings and the slanted top peaks. The lighting is modern, with variation in line for the eye to rest, it’s not a bunch of chaotic lines thrown in just for the sake of looking different. This is beautiful and will be a valuable addition to the downtown Miami skyline!

RenRich
2 months ago

Agreed,100%!

Anonymous
2 months ago

Also, a decent parking pedestal (although many of use would prefer none), and symmetrical windows and balconies.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Love how the podium cover curves up – brings roundness to the otherwise rectangular design.

Anon
2 months ago

It doesn’t “curve up”. The rendering firm was just trying to illustrate what it could look like with a breeze.

Anon
2 months ago

Well then they should redesign it so that it curves up. That’s a brilliant idea and hasn’t been done yet. I think those little blowing squares do look cool, but one must assume the second a strong wind or hurricane comes there are going to be hundreds of dangerous metal projectiles in the air, lawsuits, and gaps in the facade that will take ages to replace due to supply chain disruptions.

Anonymous
2 months ago

They do perform wind studies before these buildings are constructed.

Jerome
2 months ago

-1,395 bicycle racks

About time someone started taking cyclists into account. There’re so few places to safely park a bike in downtown Miami no wonder its a car-infested h-hole.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Another one who wants their childhood suburban experience to be imposed on their new downtown living mode. If bike riding is so important, then stay in the suburbs.

eymay
2 months ago

Bike riding is actually worse in the car-centric suburbs without much thought into pedestrian safety and bike-able streets

Anonymous
2 months ago

Agreed. Miami has a LONG way to go before being considered a bike-friendly city, which is, frankly, embarrassing.

Anonymous
2 months ago

If permits are taking 2 years to approve, we won’t be seeing this for another 8yrs

RenRich
2 months ago

The permit process is the only thing holding Miami back. I can’t even imagine how impressive the skyline would be right now. Miami is Miami’s worst enemy.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Now is the kinetic sh…

anonymous
2 months ago

hideous parking podium

RenRich
2 months ago

Parking podiums always kind of ruin urban downtown architecture. Wish it wasn’t a requirement.

Anonymous
2 months ago

They are beautiful! As long as they have beautiful ground floor retail nobody cares to see a balcony on floors 2-5. Who wants to see a college kids bike or mattress right within eye sight or hear someone’s party,

The podium actually adds a design feature and makes the building look more scalable.m, and adds a healthy boundary between the pedestrian area and residences.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Oh, you mean like a vertical gated community, basically one of the biggest no-nos for good urban planning?

Anonymous
2 months ago

Well that’s a first. I think that’s a fantastical leap of the imagination. You can’t compare a condo building to a neighborhood of homes. I don’t know any building that allows access to anyone. Thats a liability. It’s the opposite of good urban planning.

Anonymous
2 months ago

I actually think cities without podiums are uglier – it’s all 2 dimensional ground to top. Our city has more unique designs to look at from ground level.

Anonymous
2 months ago

While this one isn’t too bad, lower levels should be where the human-scale street interaction is, not parking podiums.

Free Idea Guy
2 months ago

SOLUTION: Design the ground floor retail to be two floors, with a rooftop terrace, set the podium back to make room for the terrace – then you have juman scale interaction, setbacks for air and light which are needed, beautiful design details of the podium and separation of lower floor tenants from the street noise (residences prefer to be higher up anyway to be away from noise).

Anonymous
2 months ago

Compared to anything by Related, it’s the Taj Mahal of parking podiums.