Foundation Poured At Centro, Miami’s Carless Condo

Workers have poured the foundation at Centro, with the 37-story tower now ready to go vertical.

Over two weekends, a total of 68 trucks poured 1,360 cubic yards of concrete.

Centro will include 352 units – but no parking spaces.

 

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Anonymous
7 years ago

Great to see progress in Downtown Miami…

Eric
7 years ago

There is so much progress downtown it’s almost impossible to keep track. Aside from megaprojects like Brickell City Center and Miami World Center, there are literally well over one hundred other projects both approved and planned. Downtown Miami is going to be one of the most vibrant cities in the world. Already the third largest skyline in the country, the next decade will make it unrecognizable.

WhyNotNow
7 years ago

Not a piece of dirt has been turned for Miami world center. Don’t bet they won’t flip it to someone who may or may not actually pour concrete. Lots of renderings, etc.. But no beef.

marc
7 years ago

For what it’s worth Macy’s, Bloomingdales, and Marriott have apparently signed on to anchor.

david m
7 years ago

this project could move the dial in downtown miami forever, as the huge expense saved on excavation and parking construction drives up profitability on the project overall, in turn pushing other developers into similar projects.

global reach
7 years ago

I would love to see more developments within the downtown area without parking.

Anonymous
7 years ago

this is the future of the central business district. hopefully we can see more of this type of development especially in the area of the government center with the new all aboard station coming on line.

Laz
7 years ago

huge mistake to have this without parking but i have said this before a million times.

People dont realize that the top employers are in the suburbs no where near downtown or brickell which we need cars to get to. thank god for 50, everglades, one miami, met1.

The only people attracted to this our investors to rent to the same trash that lives in Loft 1/2

Anonymous
7 years ago

Hopefully those top employers and Miami will start to attract people who are used to living in urban environments and will move their offices to downtown and Brickell where they should be. Miami’s suburban lifestyle meets density is choking its own development. You have an extremely narrow understanding of how cities work if you think that every building should have 8 levels of parking to sustain this ridiculous suburban lifestyle meets high rises. If they are top employers and have money they should have offices downtown, not in the suburbs. I’m sure the land is cheaper there, but it’s embarrassing to have meetings in Doral instead of the 48th floor of some tower on Brickell Ave, that’s a better setting than a nondescript office park on the side of a highway overlooking a man made lake with a fountain. Miami has a lot of growing up to do, right now it only looks like a big city from afar but it does not function like one. The roads are not getting any wider, the mentality and relationship people have with their cars in this city must change, at least as far as Brickell and Downtown are concerned. And it’s “are” not “our”.

LAZ
7 years ago

well maybe you havent live as long in Miami as I have but many top employers where in downtown around the 70s and early 80’s downtown did not make it easy for these companies to stay there, there is no incentive to be in downtown and thats the city’s own fault these companies all got tax breaks to move to Doral, Western Areas of Miami and now look how Miramar has become a hub for headquarters.

UMdev
7 years ago

If you’re going to call people trash you should learn the difference between “our” and “are”.

There are a growing number of people who want to live/work downtown. It fits most of there needs with an occasional trip to Wynwood/South Beach that can easily be handled with zip car.

And as amenities like City Center, World Center, and waterever comes out of Resort World, it’s only going to get better. That may not be your choice but luckily we live in a world where everyone doesn’t have to think the same and make the same choices.

You can have people who want to drive and people who don’t want to drive living in the same city.

UMdev
7 years ago

Also as far a jobs, 65% of downtown’s jobs are white collar as compared to 61% for Miami-Dade. I’ll leave you with this from the population and demographic report done in 2010:

“Increasing employment opportunities in and around downtown Miami will continue to drive population growth. With clusters in finance, bio-sciences and technology established in downtown Miami, private and institutional entities are employing professionals at the upper end of the pay scale. These important sectors garner employees from the strong downtown resident workforce. The per capita income of downtown area residents already exceeds that of both the city of Miami, by 50%, and Miami-Dade County, by 70% as discussed.”

anon
7 years ago

I agree–new “urban core” development concepts call for trying to force people out of their cars good idea–however the reality is that the overwhelming majority of folks that will be living in this building will still own an automobile. Some will utilize Zip Cars or something else BUT this is still South Florida – people work and play out of the urban core—and until public transportation changes, until entertainment venues change, until more employers relocate, traffic in downtown -especially with the 2 + million square feet of DESTINATION shopping under construction – which means an additional tens of thousands of visitors arriving by car—downtown traffic will be a nightmare and these residents will just be forced into finding a different storage solution for their cars. The City needs to take a deep breath and initiate a major traffic management plan to accommodate the total car impact in the downtown area after all of the new delivered commercial, residential and retail square footage, is in place—-what good is a world class City if you spend all your time circulating around it trying to get in.

marc
7 years ago

Agreed. The Downtown Miami and Brickell areas will be in permanent gridlock once the Brickell City Centre and Miami World Center get finished. People will be nuts to drive in these areas once it’s all said and done. Mass transit serving the entrance and egress to these areas really need to be addressed before hand but knowing the way things work down here they will let it become a problem first before coming up with the cheapest remedy.

UMdev
7 years ago

I’d completely disagree with this. The vast majority of my friends live in either Brickell, Downtown or Edgewater. We spend 90% of our time in these areas with the primary option outside of these areas being South Beach.

The only people I know who do anything outside of these areas are the people who can’t afford to live here. For example I know a few people who live in Kendall. The only reason they live there is because they grew up there and now that Brickell, Edgewater, etc. is the place to be they can’t afford it. So they come in Brickell to hang out with us, but we never go out to Kendall to hang out with them.

I really don’t know anyone who works and plays out side of the urban core who can afford to live here. Outside of the occasional few who have a spouse working in FTL or something.

And as far as the traffic issue it sort of corrects itself. By having horrible traffic you are going to push out people who want to live downtown and drive everywhere and attract people who want to live, work, walk, take the metromover to most places.

I live down here and to me the traffic only makes it more safe. Instead of cars flying by at 35 mph they are in gridlock making it easier to walk around. And of course it doesn’t bother me because I’m either walking or taking the metromove where I need to go. The only complaint I have is the lack of retail where I have to drive to Dadeland/Aventura but that problem will be gone in a matter of years.

Restaurants, bars, grocery stores, shopping, movies, bowling alleys, Miami Heat, theater, museums, etc. all within walking distance or easily accessible my the metromover. The people sitting in traffic are going to be the people living in the burbs who want to come in to see all the great options. And while they’re sitting in traffic they’ll be thinking “I wish I lived down here so I could just walk and not be stuck in traffic”.

Juan Carlos Contreras
7 years ago

Residential projects with no parking is the future of development in Downtown Miami. Hope Centro encourages other developers to build similar no parking projects throughout Downtown.