Growth: Miami Running Out Of 305 & 786 Phone Numbers, Likely To Get Another Area Code

Fast-growing Miami is likely to be getting another area code soon, with 305 and 786 numbers running low.

305 and 786 numbers are on track to run out by the first quarter of 2024, according to a petition on behalf of Florida’s telecommunications industry.

Florida’s Public Service Commission has scheduled a meeting on December 21 where it will consider adding the new area code.

Miami last got a new area code in 1998, when 786 was added.

Last week, the PSC approved adding a new area code in Palm Beach County, in addition to 561, according to the Palm Beach Post. Numbers there were set to be exhausted by 2023.

Palm Beach previously used 305, before switching to 407 (Orlando’s current area code) in 1988 and then 561 in 1997.

The 305 area code actually once belonged to the entire state of Florida when it was introduced in 1947, before Tampa was split off in 1953.

Each area code can have up to 7.9 million numbers.

The potential new Miami area code was first reported by Miami Today.

 

(image: Florida Public Service Commission)

 

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Anonymous
1 month ago

305 till I die

T G
1 month ago

cut off the keys from 305/786 and let them figure it out.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Makes sense the keys should have their own but the population down there is the amount of new people moving to dade each year

Yet Another Anonymous
1 month ago

7.9 million each is over the real amount used. that would be 16 million phone numbers for a 3 million people county plus expats. they don’t use a lot of cool combos like 666 and 420 and 6969.

to learn more hmu at 420-666-6969

Anonymous
1 month ago

A lot of people leave Florida and keep their numbers. People also have more than one number. Many people still have office and home landlines, and some even have office and personal cell phones. I don’t think 16m is that far fetched considering these factors.

Anonymous
1 month ago

3-0-5 Forever

Melo is sigma and Chad
1 month ago

305 Miami Dade County Florida, Mangos and conch fritters

Anonymous
1 month ago

Are they taking the prevalence of cell phones in consideration, as when the last area code was created in 1997, landlines were still dominant? Plenty of dead phone numbers are likely, just like dead people and vacant lots on voter rolls in Detroit.

Hutch
1 month ago

257 would be a good new area code. It’s our latitude 25.7 north and it’s not in use in North America

Anonymous
1 month ago

I wanted a 305, but I have a 786 left.

Anonymous
1 month ago

so glad im 305 and not that wack 786.

Anonymous
1 month ago

I wonder how many 305 numbers are inactive. Deaths, old unused house numbers, etc.

ur mom
1 month ago

I opened an ATT account in 2011 and got told they didnt have any more 305 numbers and got given a 561…. WTF

Anonymous
1 month ago

216

Anonymous
10 days ago

Going forward, I think new areacodes should be more regional. For example…

735: the regionally-nonspecific “South Florida” area code… generally implying at least some degree of a “Miami” identity, but available to anyone from the Keys north to Martin County.

728: the regionally-nonspecific “northern South Florida” area code… implying “South Florida”, but not quite “Miami”, available to anyone from Miami to Fort Pierce, including the future exurbs of WPB along Lake Okeechobee’s northern and eastern shore.

This neatly solves the problem of Miami’s impending exhaustion, while simultaneously ensuring that Broward won’t end up in the same boat a few years from now. It would allow people who identify with a region more than a specific county to express it via their areacode, while simultaneously keeping the number of new areacodes halfway sane for another 25-50 years.

With increasingly-regional areacodes, we can avoid needing to abandon 3-digit areacodes. America’s population is growing, and numbers are increasingly “for life”, but there aren’t going to be literally 10 billion people and businesses in the western hemisphere anytime in the next few centuries. The underlying phone numbers might someday increase to 12 digits, but we can still treat 10-digit numbers like DNS aliases. Eventually, people with 305 (and other) numbers will die (or switch to a new, more regionally-vague number), and those numbers will become available again for new people. We just have to make sure we don’t burn through every potential 10-digit number by squandering multiple areacodes on single counties first.

Azarius
1 month ago

I see no problem as long as it correlates to what we currently have

Anonymous
1 month ago

Miami need area code 69

Anonymous
1 month ago

WHO THE F CARES

Melo is sigma and Chad
1 month ago

Okay 954

Anonymous
1 month ago

Waaa