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Here’s What Brickell Looked Like The Last Time A Hurricane Came Through

The last time hurricane force winds ripped through Miami was 2005, when Hurricane Wilma became the second most costly storm to ever hit Florida.

With its rapid strengthening, west-to-east direction, and late season timing, Wilma was a particularly unusual and surprising storm.

One particular area in Brickell saw the most shattered glass, which was at least partially blamed on flying roof gravel. The 1221 Brickell and 1200 Brickell office towers had the most glass damage, while nearby Espirito Santo Plaza (now Brickell Arch) and the Four Seasons Tower also lost a lot of glass.

Other buildings in Brickell (especially newer ones) had virtually no damage.

Newer buildings use improved construction techniques and stronger glass. All of the damaged towers were approved prior to newer construction standards, which were strengthened in 2000 and 2007.

Another improvement since Wilma – most gas stations and supermarkets now have a backup power supply – which will allow for quicker reopening.

Wilma only had about 100 mile-per-hour gusts though, and a stronger storm could prove extremely dangerous.

 

1200 brickell:

espirito santo plaza and 1221 brickell:

 

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13 Comments on "Here’s What Brickell Looked Like The Last Time A Hurricane Came Through"

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Anonymous
Anonymous

With all that plywood, the damaged buildings look like something Arquitectonica or Stantec would design today to try to look edgy, except it’s cheap and nasty.

Marc306
Marc306

This is gold.

Yet Another Anonymous
Yet Another Anonymous

I liked the way the plywood looked around the base of Brickell City Centre last year while it was still being built.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You are free to become an architect, design and get the buildings you want built and make your city better.

Anonymous
Anonymous

It doesn’t take an architect to know something is ugly, especially when many schools rejects order, tradition, and/or aesthetics for a deliberate mess equivalent to a Jackson Pollock painting.

Canes
Canes

It’s a true shame because UM was always one of the best traditional/classical schools in the nation, but the new dean seems to want to go in the opposite direction.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Too busy prepping to comment this week

Marc305
Marc305

I have been in South Florida for over 20 years and I have been through many storms. Cat 1-2-3 I don’t give it a second thought. The media loves to exaggerate and I remember once being in Hollywood Beach watching a CNN reporter on TV (in Hollywood Beach) talking like it was the end of the world when in reality it was no big deal. However, when a Cat 4 or 5 approach my business partners and I high tail out of town. Irma is no joke so a road trip is in order, not sure where yet and it really does not matter, just away from this monster.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Andrew in 1992 was a monster I will never forget, having owned homes in both homestead and the keys.

John
John

I remember Andrew in 92 all too well. Scary and effective.

Wilma in 2005 was no joke either. Not just the cat level of a hurricane, but the “bar” metric unit of pressure (intensity level ) on these monsters is an important factor.
Wilma was the most intense hurricane recorded when it intensified going from 3 to 5. With an mbar of 882. My house and neighborhood were rearranged effectively.

Yet Another Anonymous
Yet Another Anonymous

Yes, this was a weakened storm that passed over a hundred miles of land, and then was still not a direct downtown Miami hit. The max wind possible under a perfect scenario of a hurricane not hitting too many islands on the way is up near 200 mph winds, and gusts over 200 mph. That is a whole ‘nother thing than 100 mph.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Let’s pray it goes in a different direction 🙏

Marc305
Marc305

Out to sea and away from populated areas.

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