Large-Scale Special Area Plans Which Allowed For Projects Such As Brickell City Centre Could Be Eliminated From Miami 21 Zoning Code, If Board Has Its Way

Miami’s Planning, Zoning and Appeals Board wants the city to reconsider the development regulation known as Special Area Plans allowed for under the Miami 21 code, which have allowed for large scale projects such as Brickell City Centre and Miami Worldcenter to be built.

Under Miami 21, developers who assemble 9 or more acres are entitled to file for a Special Area Plan, which allows for extra dense zoning and higher flexibility in design guidelines.

Special Area Plans that have been submitted include Brickell City Centre, Miami Worldcenter, the Bjarke Ingels-designed Miami Produce Center, and Miami Innovation District. Others are planned at Crescent Height’s 3000 Biscayne, Magic City, Mana Wynwood and Chetrit Group’s Miami River site.

The Special Area Plan provision has been coming under attack lately from a handful of community activists, however.

Last night, Miami’s Planning, Zoning and Appeals Board voted 7-1 to ask city staff to draft a resolution on the possible removal of the Special Area Plans provision from Miami 21.

The Planning, Zoning and Appeals Board board has also been accused of intentionally delaying SAPs by deferring votes rather than approve or deny them.

Developer SPV Realty is suing the city because the Planning, Zoning and Appeals Board has deferred a vote on its 5.4 million square feet Eastside Ridge Special Area Plan five times. Deferrals are worse for the developer than a denial, because in case of a denial the project can still appear before the city commission which can overrule the lower board, while a deferral can hold up the project indefinitely.

Anothony Parrish, a member of the Board, wrote in a recent op-ed in the Herald that he is opposed to SAPs because they are gentrifying areas such as Little Haiti.

 

 

The Eastside Ridge Special Area Plan that has been delayed by the Planning, Zoning & Appeals Board:

 

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Anonymous

Midtown was the old Chiquita banana plant. MWC was a bunch of empty lots. Much of the Innovation District is an underused industrial area. Interesting definition of gentrification.

Not Gene

That’s true, but Magic City…

Anonymous

What is now Magic City was a old run-down trailer park, where girls were getting raped behind dark warehouse in broad daylight.. where 100% the original residents are dead by now.

Miami is benefiting from this redevelopment.

Anonymous

Keeping it real

Anonymous

Gentrification is the number one crime fighting tool.

Anonymous

you’re the #1 TOOL !

Anonymous

I like Tool!

Anonymous

The new album is awesome^

Anonymous

That’s what she said!

Anonymous

Before removing the SAP from the Miami 1821 Zoning, the other things that must be removed are the gates in Morning Side and Bellmeade to stop Miami most segregated neighborhoods from controlling Miami taxpayer’s freedom of movement after that they should revise The Miami 1821 Zoning Code to let Miami Urban Core grow accordingly. Increase the population density in the urban core and stop expanding into the everglades.

Not Gene

What? The Everglades is nowhere near the City boundaries, and Miami 21 is literally allowing for densification of the urban core.

Anonymous

Ive always pondered how morningside and Bellmeade can be developed. Miami Beach wasn’t once exclusively mansions for the rich. Fountainbleu is a prime example. I think billionaire developers would have to on buy up lots one by one until they own the community and turn it into an exclusive high end development. Like a billionaires row. Design district, midtown, Brickell, all these areas weren’t but exactly high end which made them affordable for development. Morningside etc would need to have a serious investment for it to change.

Anonymous

Morningside is developed, as an established historic district of some of Miami’s best single family architecture. The gates will come down when Biscayne Boulevard and Palm Grove catch up, and will when Lemon City across the tracks cleans up.

If your idea of seeing single family neighborhoods “developed” is another Edgewater, that’s absurd.

Anonymous

Brickell was once a single family neighborhood.

Anonymous

It’s right across the river from downtown, so vertical construction ultimately was inevitable. Morningside is well outside the Greater Downtown Miami boundary, and along with MiMo, Palm Grove, Buena Vista, etc. can’t be redeveloped into skyscrapers. Not only because historic designation, but the air rights were transferred to go more vertical elsewhere.

Anonymous

I think Lemon City could use all the gentrification it can get.

Anon

who upvotes this? dude drops one period in this long run on (stupid) thought. automatic downvote.

Anonymous

I’ll down vote your stupid comment just for not capitalizing your letters after your periods Mr. Grammar Police

305

Have you ever even looked at the zoning map? The entire idea of Miami21 is to increase population density in the urban core and along transit corridors. The ones wanting to expand into the Everglades are MDT and the idiot politicians.

Anonymous

Taller buildings are generally more high end because of their views which justify the higher construction costs. This special exception should be allowed. I understand more density on the consolidated site, but they should allow the density and height and permit the project if it acquires TDR from other sites.

Anonymous

I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again. Short squat buildings are designed to hold heat and that’s why they belong in cold climate areas like the northeast and others. Tall slender buildings dissipate heat more efficiently and are more conducive for hot and humid climate places like Miami.

Why some people, politicos, and developers in Miami don’t get this simple concept is beyond me.

Anon

because it’s not true whatsoever. by that logic, we should build all buildings in the northeast underground since it’s cold and the earth will keep them warm and block the wind.

Anonymous

Gee, Anon is so smart. Tell us Anon, if you’re going to build dwellings underground, how much are you willing to spend to keep water from seeping in? You do know that that is a constant threat to the NYC subway system don’t you? By the way, short squat apartment buildings can block the wind more efficiently than tall slender buildings.

Anonymous

I really can’t understand why “community activists” are allowed to have sway when it comes to issues that people are voted for and others placed in offices to run. If that’s the case, forget voting for mayors and commissioners and just let community activist run the cities and counties.

Not Gene

Well, when items go on the ballot, turnout is so low that controversial items usually pass without a hitch. There should really be a quorum equivalent to passing these types of projects that do make it to public ballots (Melreese, Parrot Jungle, Adler, etc.). Between low turnout and an uninformed public (voting for commissioners and ballot items), a lot of controversial deals end up getting approved. This is why activists get involved.

Anonymous

Hi Gene! Are you excited for Ultra?

Anonymouse

There are members of boards and commissions that will fight tooth and nail to preserve status quo,especially in the lower income areas,protecting their constituents.This means they are willing to disregard the rule “If you not moving forward,you’re falling back”.What does that mean in this and other cases? Stagnation and “little Haiti as we know it for ever”? If you look in the direction of other aspiring “global cities”,they usually chew their way through these problems.Their vision is the future and ultimately uplifting the condition of all their inhabitants.That is why we need new smart developments,looking into and preserving deep past for any reason and price just doesn’t work.Can not stand still!

Anonymous

Special Area Plant wouldn’t be so necessary if, you know, the rest of Miami21 was followed without waiver after waiver for glass and concrete boxes with parking garages.

The fact a Board member admitted his vote against Eastside Ridge was over Lemon City/Little Haiti changing once again tells you everything.

Anonymous

Definitely some bs. SAP’s bring some of the most interesting and noteworthy projects, it’ll be a shame if all we see are boring buildings from now on

Reality

No SAP would have meant no Climate Ribbon. Let that marinate…

Anonymous

Great! All cabdrivers in Miami are happy now.

Anonymous

Don’t think that’s the solution. There needs to be some way to allow for more flexible zoning for larger parcels. What in not being said about the East Ridge plan is how the heights and densities being proposed greatly exceed the SAP code. It should have simply been denied long ago.

Anonymous

Probably a good idea. While there have been some successes – there have also been some massive failures (see: Miami World Center)

Anonymous

Would you say Midtown Miami is an failure because it wasn’t completed at once ? Neither Midtown Miami nor Miami World Center are finished yet.

Anonymous

Miami WorldCenter is gentrifying Park West.. remember what that area looked like before?

BTW, redevelopment saved Miami.. which was bankrupt a few years ago.

This is all about special interest in the Haitian community… Property isn’t even in Little Haiti.

Anonymous

Miami was “bankrupt” two or three years ago?

Okay….

Anonymous

Nobody lived in Park West. It was all empty lots and industrial. Nobody was pushed out because nobody lived there.

Anonymous

MWC destroyed the grid for a parking garage. How is that a success?

Not Gene

For the garage or the pedestrian promenade/paseo? Huge difference.

Anonymous

Scratching my head…

So, Miami World Center “destroyed” a desolate area?

That’s like saying “the items left from the Apollo missions destroyed the moon.”