Leasing Underway At Edgewater’s 2500 Biscayne, With 156 Units

Another 156 apartments will soon be filled in Edgewater.

2500 Biscayne is now open for leasing. The apartment project was designed by Architect Robert Behar of Behar Font & Partners.

It includes the restoration and integration of a historic building on the site, overseen by RJ Heisenbottle.

Leasing Begins at Greystone Development’s 2500 Biscayne in Edgewater District of Miami
October 3, 2017

Greystone Development announced it has launched leasing at the highly-anticipated 2500 Biscayne building in the Edgewater district of Miami, FL. The glistening 19-story rental building boasts 156 residential units at the epicenter of the area’s burgeoning arts enclave and within close proximity to Biscayne Bay.

2500 Biscayne Boulevard is comprised of one- and two-bedroom units all with private outdoor space. The property boasts a thoughtful amenity package designed to cater to the active lifestyle of its residents with a pool, sundeck, lounge and game room, coffee bar, concierge, garage, and a fitness center. Leasing and Management is being handled by RIVERGATE KW Residential.

“2500 is a top property in one of Miami’s most desirable urban neighborhoods, and we are so excited to spearhead the leasing,” said Marcie Williams, President of RIVERGATE KW Residential. “We look forward to the opportunity to work with Greystone Development on this stunning community.”

Greystone curated a dream team of talent. Design visionary Architect Robert Behar of Behar Font & Partners envisioned a property that seamlessly integrated the historic alongside of the newly constructed, larger tower optimizing the footprint and also the experience for the resident. The homes Behar Font & Partners crafted maximize light, air and views with magnificent floor to ceiling windows. Floorplans are open and include a chef-inspired kitchen with quartz countertops, energy-efficient stainless-steel appliances, walk-in closets and in-unit washer dryers. RJ Heisenbottle imagined a restoration of the historic portion that would bring the structure back to its former glory.

Architect Robert Behar introduced Greystone to local artist and longtime family friend Magnus Sodamin. Parlaying off of the aesthetic that Behar Font established, Magnus created two exterior art murals spanning 75 and 90 feet wide. The murals take into consideration the culture and context of the surrounding neighborhood, pulsating with excitement and color. Through and through, 2500 Biscayne radiates light and vibrancy, offering the local market a truly unique product.

“Each successive Miami project that we take on becomes more exciting, and 2500 Biscayne brings a unique element to the Edgewater district with its ‘historical meets modern’ aesthetic,” said Jeff Simpson‍, head of Greystone Development. “We thank our partners in making the building a success, as the final result has exceeded our expectations. It’s a gorgeous addition to the neighborhood,” he added.

“2500 Biscayne pays tribute to the neighborhood’s roots by meticulously preserving the historical portion that reflects many of the signature architectural elements of the Mediterranean Revival Style,” said Jill Preschel, Vice President of Marketing, Greystone Development. “And with the modern addition of Magnus’ striking work on the exterior, the property makes a beautiful statement embracing the culture known to this area of Miami.”

Elsewhere in South Florida, Greystone is currently developing The Aura, a 14-story mixed-use apartment building designed by Borges + Associates Architects. Located at 1501 SW 37th Avenue, The Aura will feature 100 residences and 6,400 square feet of ground floor retail, with over 150 feet of frontage along a highly trafficked retail corridor.

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Anonymous
4 years ago

Looks beautiful.. much better than renderings.

Anonymous
4 years ago

I read elsewhere that the building is comprised of one- and two-bedroom open floor plans ranging from $2,023 to $3,800 per month! Unless they’re offering huge incentives, there’s no way they rent at those prices.

Yohan Perez
4 years ago

This is a real beauty. I always admire this sipping my cocktails from the verandah of Latin Cafe 2000

Anonymous
4 years ago

Great corner location for a pet store.. hopefully they lease to retail for pet supplies and services like day care, dog walking, pet sitting, etc.

Anonymous
4 years ago

A nice restaurant would go well there.

Anonymous
4 years ago

CVS Pharmacy

Anonymous
4 years ago

We don’t need anymore CVS, 7-Eleven, Subway, Dunkin’ Donuts, etc. crapholes, thank you very much.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Those who crave chains can go to Broward.

Anonymous
4 years ago

…or a Martin County truck stop.

Anonymous
4 years ago

rents will be to high for any small business.get used to corporate tenants like cvs,sebbin-lebbin,etc

William
4 years ago

I read on the real deal that Alta was involved… “Greystone Development and Alta Developers started leasing units at 2500 Biscayne, a 19-story apartment building in Miami’s Edgewater neighborhood.”

I wonder if this is the case???

Anonymous
4 years ago

They could have done it with the same architecture of the old structure for the whole new building ……. much better look and mix for the area ….

Anonymous
4 years ago

they should have put a grocery store on that bottom floor. much needed.

ZachJ305
4 years ago

There is a Publix literally 8 blocks away between 17th-18th Streets on Biscayne. A Price Choice Foodmarket at 2nd ave/19th St. And a Target with an extensive grocery section in midtown less than 10 blocks away…it seems to be pretty well served.

Anonymous
4 years ago

It’s not cohesive at all.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Meaning, cohesive with what, your house?

Anonymous
4 years ago

What a joke. Architecturally and historically, Miami is so far behind the greatest architecture in the world, with the exception of isolated projects. What a lost opportunity to showcase an integrate part of our past with that historic piece, thinned down into a mockery

Anonymous
4 years ago

Well, they waited for you to buy the building and spend a coupla million dollars restoring it to it’s former glory, but they found out that you were too stingy with your money so they on ahead and spent money, giving us what you see now.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Shut up with your argumentative fallacies. So much more could have been done to preserve the existing building while building a solid new development. With only a slither of the original facade retained and an hulking box with irregular balconies, 2500 Biscayne fails at both criteria.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Well, look at it this way, now you have something new that will one day become historic.

Now, how’s that for an “argumentative fallacy?”

Anonymous
4 years ago

you devolved from “argumentative Fallacy” to “stubborn stupidity”

Anonymous
4 years ago

Right, because if that were to happen, I’d imagine you’re type would be the first cheering its demolition for “progress.” Besides, a cheap-looking apartment building like this will never be historic compared the 1920s former with its intricate craftsmanship, timelessness, and charm. Restoring it and building behind in a classical or nicer-looking style, or building above in a classical style would have been so much better. Look at The St. James in Philadelphia and Heart Tower in NYC as examples.

Anonymous
4 years ago

What a joke of a comparison.. get a life.

Anonymous
4 years ago

What a defeatist nimrod. I’d love to get a life if my quality of life wasn’t impaired by crummy half-assed developments.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Is that the best you could come up with? It’s getting old, your response…tell us about what YOU think about the building, the response to a Historical construction, what do you think about the building’s approach to the urban setting, fenestration, massing, etc.

Anonymous
4 years ago

Gee I didn’t know that when they built that building they obviously were trying to construct something historic?

Anonymous
4 years ago

This is what Historic Preservation should NOT look like at all. No attempt to integrate the “historic” structure with the new design.

Anonymous
4 years ago

I’ll tell what you can do with your historic structure……

Anonymous
4 years ago

Girls, girls you’re both pretty.
At least they kept the façade of the old building.
If you tear down everything from prior eras the city ends up looking like Dallas, a place with no soul.