Mature Trees Planted At Riverfront Lot Next To Brickell City Centre

Landscaping and site improvements are underway at 451 South Miami Avenue, which sits on the Miami River.

Mature trees have now been planted at the property, and pavers have been delivered to the site.

The property is owned by Miami River Holdings LLC, said to be controlled by Carlos Mattos. Nicolas and Isabella Mattos are listed as managers.

Brickell City Centre’s North Squared site is across the street, currently vacant and used for parking.

The only active construction permit for the property is to install temporary toilets.

No riverwalk currently exists on the site, but property owners are required to build one when they develop their land.

 

 

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Anonymous
1 year ago

This will probably be something like the Wharf and then redeveloped in the next cycle. Land too valuable and expensive to not build towers on.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Hope all the people speculating that they’re doing a temporary installment like The Wharf are right (that is, if the alternative was that the land stays empty and boarded up until eventual construction). I hope that The Wharf’s success changes developer strategy going forward with respect to land banking, cycle timing etc. You can defray holding costs directly AND market the area beforehand with a little creativity.

Anonymous
1 year ago

I am not speculating.
Listen to me now, understand me later.

Anonymous
1 year ago

YES!!!!!!!!!!! MORE TREES !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Seems like they’ll make this area into a temporary park until they’re ready to build during the next cycle, which would be a welcoming deviation from the norm especially as a waterfront lot. Or they’re completely wasting their time and money to plant trees that’ll be behind a locked gate…

Anonymous
1 year ago

Nope. It will have a beer garden, restaurants, event space and the river greenway will connect with Brickell on the River and the Metromover station.

Anonymous
1 year ago

That would be ideal

Anonymous
1 year ago

Can we make the trees permanent and not have any development on this site?

Miami1
1 year ago

NO!!

Anonymous
1 year ago

GO BACK TO NY!

Anonymous
1 year ago

I’ll go back to NY when you go back to Alabama!

Anonymous
1 year ago

sorry, all the hillbilies from Alababama are bit north near Ft. Lauderdale.

Gene
1 year ago

Alababama ? Sounds more fitting than the original name.

Anonymous
1 year ago

?

Magazine
1 year ago

Sure. Simply purchase the property and do as you please.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Sure! You can buy the site and keep trees on it.

Anonymous
1 year ago

They are probably being careful not to build anything “permanent” which will require them to build the riverwalk.

SRS
1 year ago

What are they planning for this site?

SRS
1 year ago

Temporary park?

Anonymous
1 year ago

The wharf will be for the young people, this will be more sophistcated.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Looks like they planted dead trees. Why do they look like?

Anonymous
1 year ago

Why are people so adamant about having a building in every single corner of the city? 29374 buildings is not enough? will keeping this plot for trees really kill you ?

Why do people want Miami to turn into Manhattan so much? IF YOU WANT CONCRETE! GO BACK UP NORTH!

Anonymous
1 year ago

Most of the Miami is too sprawling to support a true urban environment. Brickell/Downtown, even with all the development they’ve experienced over the past decade and change, are still TREMENDOUSLY under built.

IF YOU DON’T WANT CONCRETE GET OUT OF THE URBAN CORE AND GO WEST TO KENDALL

Anonymous
1 year ago

Heck, to witness what you said, all one has to do is look at areas next to metrorail and metromover stops that are woefully lacking in residential structures next to them.

Anonymous
1 year ago

What if I was born and raised in Miami and wanted more concrete?

Anonymous
1 year ago

Then you’re not a smart individual.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Okay, forget the concrete, I’ll just get ready to see more trees blown down after the next hurricane.

Anonymous
1 year ago

How about you spend millions of dollars and buy this lot then donate it to the city for a park. Until then, just be happy they are not turning it into a parking lot or garage.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Maybe because it’s prime real estate, and the other downtown parks also on prime real estate and too underutilized?

Urban Realist
1 year ago

That land is about $1K or MORE s/f — no developer in their right mind would leave it as a park especially when there are no government incentives for a park. The entity that should build parks is government officials and they’re not doing it. I don’t understand why people think private land owners should be providing parks on their expensive land. It’s a financial issue not because developers hate green space.

Anonymous
1 year ago

Great to see some trees that provide shelters to the homeless population

Anonymous
1 year ago

Glad you’re so concerned about the homeless.. now what day and time are you giving out free sandwiches?

Anonymous
1 year ago

Miami-Dade has made big strides over the last decade in reducing the homeless population. The remainder is mostly either transient homeless (will move or get back on their feet again) or the hard core cases – drug dependent, mental illness, unskilled, unable to cope, etc.
They are homeless, but they are still human beings.

Anonymous
1 year ago

..and they can hang laundry on the trees