Met Square Adding Plaza, Gallery & Exhibits To Display Historic Findings At Site

A plan to display historically significant findings at the Met Square project is up for review by Miami’s Historic and Environmental Preservation Board tomorrow.

Two prehistoric circles believed to be foundations for Tequesta dwellings would be on display to the public at two corners of the property, with an indoor gallery and exhibit around one of them.

Also on display would be several finds at the site dating to more recent history. A Fort Dallas well from the 19th Century will be visible through glass, while a plaza in between Met Square and Met 1 would have elements from the Royal Palm Hotel, which opened in 1897. The original Miami River shoreline would be marked in the plaza.

A lawsuit By University of Miami archaeologist William J. Pestle over a previous agreement with the city remains pending (Pestle is suing over Sunshine Law violations).

Met Square will eventually include a 467-foot hotel tower with 392 rooms, along with a 1,780-seat movie theater and 37,666-square-feet of restaurant space.

 

 

Full plan:

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Sigh
6 years ago

Obviously, you’re an idiot. In a community short on history and even shorter on preservation, we have to do what it takes to preserve what we still can. If they can work out a plan that preserves the archeological findings in a meaningful way, proceed with the development, and even incorporate those findings to compliment that development – as this appears to do – why moan about it?

Obviously
6 years ago

Well obviously you’re the idiot for thinking that a couple of plain looking dug out circles in the ground represents some kind of historical significance because someone told you to believe it does.

Miami almost lost a much needed development downtown because of dummies like you who are looking for something, anything, to point at and say “it’s my past and it shouldn’t be touched!”

Sigh
6 years ago

While I’m sure your archeological credentials are extensive, I’m happy siding with those that tout the site’s significance. As you can also clearly see, this development is alive and well. Just as it would be stupid to halt any and all development in the name of preservation, it’s also pretty stupid to haphazardly bulldoze over history to build glassy new towers. There’s a reason why there’s a middle ground.

Anonymous
6 years ago

Your ignorant sarcasm aside, it amuses me sometimes at how gullible people can be without seriously analyzing what someone is conning them with. One person was giving two years to dig around on that site and not once in that period did he declare some holes in a circle as being significant during that time and he still hadn’t found anything to blast his name in the media as being this “Incredible Archaeologist” because he knew nothing of any significance was there. It was only after he was told “times up, we’re about to begin construction” by the developer that suddenly he acted as if he’d just stumbled across the most incredible find in the history of Miami – HOLES IN THE GROUND that may have been used for posts, and the usual gullible people bought it. Miami almost lost this significant development downtown because of some preservasionist nuts in the county who wanted to keep it from happening.

Sorry, but I ain’t buying the hype like you and these wanna be preservasionist because you’re the people who stifled Miami’s progress in the past because of your gullibleness.

mechanesthesia
6 years ago

I really don’t understand where all of your whining is coming from. The building is still there being built. They just added some historical elements to it, which add a unique twist to this building and set it aside from the development monotony. You’re acting like they halted construction for these holes. I repeat the building is there currently being built.
Also, your arbitrary skepticism doesn’t make you any more or less intelligent.

Anonymous
6 years ago

It is one thing to be ignorant. It is quite another thing to be ignorant and proud of it. People don’t have to like archaeology or have an interest in historical preservation, but people should at least have the ability to recognize the educational and cultural benefits of learning about our past. Miami has few such historical resources and I am glad it is being preserved. I only wish that the entire site could have been preserved and interpreted, rather then these small pieces. No matter what the Tequestas used the site for, showing our history adds to the cultural richness of Miami. Clearly others believe the same, which is why the site is being preserved. It is also for this reason that we have federal and state laws mandating studies of historical preservation for major developments.

Obviously
6 years ago

Um yeah sure, I think I’ll go dig around Bayfront Park and see if I can find the exact spot where the “COLORED ONLY” waterfountain stood. I mean, it still has to be there somewhere! Heck, I’ll even put an exact replica of it on the site and enclose it in a structure to keep it out of the weather. That would be something very educational and the cultural benefits of learning about our past concerning the historical significance of this waterfountain would be priceless…wouldn’t you agree Mr or Ms Anonymous?

The cultural richness you could get from stories of Miami’s first “Colored Only” waterfountain downtown would be astronomical, and you wouldn’t even have to try and guess what it is or make believe what’s it’s for or why it was there!

You know, we really shouldn’t shun our true history in Miami.

Anonymous
6 years ago

I see, you absolutely have a problem with noticing the asinine and nauseating nuances of Miami when it comes to some of the duplicitous people who have ability to manipulate those who are unworthy of their existance in Miami politics. You, Mr mechanesthesia, shouldn’t bitch at those who recognize the con man but instead join in and be a vanguard against such banality as this before it get to become precedence, or get taken every time.

Obviously
6 years ago

“Two prehistoric circles believed to be foundations for Tequesta dwellings would be on display….”

You can believe anything you want about them. I believe they were two trash burning sites used by the tequesta people.

They shouldn’t have never bothered that developer with this crap.