Miami-Dade To Create Intense Development Zone At Government Center

Property owned by Miami-Dade County, including Government Center and the surrounding area, is proposed to be placed into a new development zone

The properties would be removed from the more restrictive City of Miami planning and zoning rules, and placed into a county-controlled zoning sub-district.

Intense usage would be permitted on the properties, without city regulations such as setback requirements.

Miami-Dade’s commission is scheduled to vote on the plan at a July 24 meeting.

 

(photo: phillip pessar)

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Anonymous
2 years ago

Looks like a Florida East Coast deal is coming up!

A. Nonymous
2 years ago

Plenty of room for Amazon HQ2.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Uhh, why does the county feel that land in miami shouldn’t be subject to miami’s zoning/planning regulations?

Anonymous
2 years ago

Because Miami’s zoning/planning regulations are somewhat too archaic and restrictive.

Oscar
2 years ago

Miami’s form-based zoning code, which is less than a decade old, is somehow “archaic?”

Anonymous
2 years ago

Yes, because in a growing place like Miami and MiamiDade county that has a restictive Urban Boundary Development Line, some people surmised that imposing increased setbacks and parking requirements along with unnecessary low building height is not looking forward. It’s just mentality stuck in a bygone era of Miami and the county.

Anonymous
2 years ago

It’s not archaic. It just doesn’t seem to be enforced when developers get waiver after waiver.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Developers get a waiver after waiver because Miami 21 was completely manipulated by people with zero vision, for their political gain. They “Planed” redeveloping Miami like it stills a 1960’s retired babyboomers paradise.
Ex. Sarnoff and his protege Elvis Cruz ruined any possible redevelopment of the Biscayne Corridor by imposing a crazy height restriction.

Mondocondo
2 years ago

The greater of 80 stories or what the FAA permits is crazy?

Anonymous
2 years ago

I didn’t know allowing developers to build towers setback far from the street with ugly parking garages at street level wasn’t “a 1960’s retired babyboomers paradise.” It’s literally the same mindset from old Miami Beach condos, only uglier a lot of the time.

YaTw
2 years ago

There were no retired babyboomers in the 1960s…

Anonymous
2 years ago

Miami 21 stifles creativity from architects and promotes a sameness that I do not appreciate personally.
It also REQUIRES retail space in areas where the market doesn’t want/need retail space. This makes housing “less affordable”.

Mondocondo
2 years ago

Yes, I look at all the new towers coming up under Miami 21 and think I’m back in a Soviet housing block. Pure monotony. Cheers

Anonymous
2 years ago

Sorry, but it’s not Miami21’s fault here either. You can blame that on Related/Arquitectonica’s monopoly of monotony. We need design guidelines, encouraging innovative contemporary as well as genuine classical architectural styles, and discouraging cheap and nasty materials and irregular window placement making buildings look like shipping crates and/or even literal jails.

Anonymous
2 years ago

For 1, the most pressing change should be lower parking requirements oe even better, no requirement at all.
Cities are built with grit and daring and we’re young. We can take the risk.

Mondocondo
2 years ago

This is already the case. But do it at your risk, youngster. Cheers

Anonymous
2 years ago

It’s a sub-district overlay, meaning perks for better urbanism should be used in a favor of conventional zoning rules. Then again, we haven’t seen much success in form-based coding *cough* Miami21 *cough*.

Anonymous
2 years ago

I called it Miami 1821.
The code was already obsolete the day it was approved.

Mondocondo
2 years ago

It’s been amended 3 times, and the city does show some flexibility in certain areas, so it’s not written in stone. It’s just a tool, and better developers learn to work with it. It certainly produces better buildings then we amazingly still see coming up from the last gasp of the old code. Cheers

Anonymous
2 years ago

Because the city is not instance enough.

Sertorius
2 years ago

Because it is the government and doesn’t want to play by its own rules.

Mondocondo
2 years ago

Precisely. The above it all mentality.

Anonymous
2 years ago

Good news… Hopefully a deal is reached to renovate Government Center, which despite being thirty-five years old, has aged terrible, suffering from “sick building syndrome.”

Groveside King
2 years ago

The building design is Soviet-like, it’s fallen into disrepair, a meeting point for Downtown’s Hobo’s, lacks light in space…just a worthless building that needs renovation.

Anonymous
2 years ago

It’s a Brutalist monstrosity built twenty years late when the style was in fashion. At least Soviet buildings had spires, even when built thirty years after we were building similar skyscrapers in the West.

It needs to be stripped to its skeleton, and re-clad in some sweet curved glass, and maybe given a nice cap functioning as a public observation deck.

Anonymous
2 years ago

so the county is breaking it’s own rules for it’s own land while everyone else stays locked….got it

Anonymous
2 years ago

All pigs are equal, but some pigs are more equal than others…

Anonymous
2 years ago

Large density and height increases are totally appropriate for this location given the transit connections but decreased setbacks are not appropriate. In fact with taller and denser buildings the sidewalk setback should be increased. You don’t see any 5 foot sidewalks in NYC.

Mondocondo
2 years ago

Couldn’t agree more. The design at the street level is most important to creating a sense of urban neighborhoods. The fact that the government is crowding out the sidewalks with its own buildings is shameful. The people should be able to walk comfortably around a building of their government. There’s too much attention to the birds eye view. We are bipeds, not birds. Cheers

Anonymous
2 years ago

Good! Now apply this to all of Brickell, Eastside, Design District, Wynwood, Little Havana, Coconut Grove, and really I’ll say, most of Miami.