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Miami-Dade Transit Ridership Down 19% Since Uber Arrived

Miami-Dade Transit Ridership Down 19% Since Uber Arrived

Residents of Miami-Dade have been abandoning the bus in droves since Uber arrived, newly released county statistics show.

Since 2014 (when Uber started operations), total ridership on Metrobus, Metrorail and Metromover has dropped every single year, with Metrobus the hardest hit.

Losses have accelerated following the introduction of the cheaper Uberpool option, with an overall loss of 9.6% in 2017 alone. Losses in 2016 were 6.9%, with a 4.8% decline in 2015 and 0.6% in 2014 (when Uber only existed for a few months).

Transit losses are coming despite huge growth in the area. In recent years, both the city of Miami and the Miami metro area have ranked near the top for population gains nationally, according to census data.

 

 

Dade transit is too inept to even operate the relatively simple metromover system, as this video shows. At each station, riders are subjected to waits of over 30 seconds – long after passengers have completed boarding and disembarking, for no apparent reason:

 

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65 Comments on "Miami-Dade Transit Ridership Down 19% Since Uber Arrived"

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Miami Hurricane
Miami Hurricane

I’ve been saying it for years: 6-9 months a year. it is too humid in Miami to stand outside for a ride when you are commuting for something work related and then have to walk there. The metromover can be the exception at times. It’s not being naive, it’s when you show up sweaty to a meeting or workplace — it looks a bit unprofessional particularly in a city driven by aesthetics.

Anonymous
Anonymous

6-9 months?!! Only if you have to wear a suit to your job, or if you’re 60% body fat.

Miami Hurricane
Miami Hurricane

That’s my point… people tend to have to wear professional attire to work. Must be nice rocking shorts and a t-shirt.

Anonymous
Anonymous

How many wear a suit every day, especially in Miami? Better hope that job pays at least $80K/yr just to cover the dry cleaning bills. Otherwise, time to learn coding or carpentry.

Anonymous
Anonymous

People wear suits to lower income jobs as well.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Those people are schmucks.

Miami Hurricane
Miami Hurricane

“Yeah, fuck those people working in the stores I go to”

Anonymous
Anonymous

You can be wearing a thong, and still show up sweating to a meeting in Miami.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You can literally be laying outside, doing nothing, in next to no clothing (ie, a thong), and still sweat.

It’s called sunbathing at the beach.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Roughly 250,000 people work downtown.
The AVERAGE Household income in Brickell is $110,000.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The average high from March to November are above 80 degrees (9 months). The average daily mean is 80 or above from May until October (6 months).

That’s pretty warm when you factor in humidity and work attire. Then having to walk any distance to/from public transit stations in said weather and attire, can certainly make it less than comfortable.

In Manhattan the average high is above 80 for only 3 months (June-August). And the average daily mean is never above 80 at any point during the year (0 months). For comparison’s sake.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Then move to Manhattan. Lots of public transit and not as many over-80 degree days. Your utopia.

Andrewn2
Andrewn2

Chicagoans will stand outside in -10 below to use mass transit. I don’t by the weather factor. I think people in Miami don’t use mass transit because there are few routes that take you where you want or need to go. A rail line to the beach would be a game changer.

Anonymous
Anonymous

What an absurd comparison, there are plenty of things you can do to tolerate the cold, but there’s nothing you can do to tolerate the heat, especially if you’re in a suit. Only thing I could think of is to carry your suit in a bag and get dressed at work. And maybe take a shower at work too.

rivardau
rivardau
oh, people in Bangkok, Singapore, cairo, abu Dhabi – all wear suits and their temps are much higher than Miami… also, when I was in Bangkok, it is even gauche to walk around the city on personal time in tank tops, it is rude to show your shoulders in thai society if you not at the beach. You need suits that are designed for summer weather with more venting, more breathable fabrics. the suits that are sold in NYC are not the right type to sell in Miami, but because american retailers and distributors are too simplistic to keep their costs down, you end up having the wrong clothes on offer at your Sears or Macy store. But that is not a transit issue, that is a personal issue of not buying the right clothes….and to buy the right clothes costs more money. because up in Canada, we learn that we have to buy the right clothes – and a lot more of it like heavy parkas – to survive….and yet we also go to business meetings in regular suits…. you need employers to install more locker rooms and showers, you need differnt types of materials for your clothes, you… Read more »
Anonymous
Anonymous

Except the King of Thailand is allowed to wear tank tops. 😉

Anonymous
Anonymous

Then move to Chicago if the heat bothers you so darn much. You can’t be here for the high pay and low housing costs.

Miami Hurricane
Miami Hurricane

What are your arguments? That someone should move because they said it is too hot to use public transportation most of the year so I use alternative means? It’s a simple fact that several other people agree with.

Also as far as going to SE Asia, that’s great if you can make that commute without sweating, but again it comes down to showing up to work or wherever you are going professional looking, not sweating. Over 80% of Miami’s train stations are outside, not air-conditioned. It’s the same problem that major cities in the South all share and it goes back to American culture. That’s what you get for having a leading economy: professional expectations.

Anonymous
Anonymous

There isn’t jack you can do to tolerate 5 below zero standing at a windy bus stop. I’ve done it before. I’ll taking 90 and humid any day.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Nearly everyone drives to work in Detroit, but not nearly as many sweaty days in Detroit as Miami. Figure that one out, sweathogs.

Anonymous
Anonymous

So what is your suggestion? We physically cannot fit any more cars downtown. Public transport is our only option to get this city functional.

Anonymous
Anonymous

For starters, have cooled stations in Miami. Maybe start with misters, or fans — even a half ass attempt would be ideal even though it goes back more to humidity as much if not more than the heat. Metromover included. The ultimate resolution would be indoor air conditioned stations. It’s not energy efficient but if you really want the push towards public transport that’s it. There are engineering solutions out there that would mitigate the energy loss.

Miami Hurricane
Miami Hurricane

For starters, have cooled stations in Miami. Maybe start with misters, or fans — even a half ass attempt would be ideal even though it goes back more to humidity as much if not more than the heat. Metromover included. The ultimate resolution would be indoor air conditioned stations. It’s not energy efficient but if you really want the push towards public transport that’s it. There are engineering solutions out there that would mitigate the energy loss.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Slacker operation of MetroMover is a good reason to hand over the operation to a private company. No unions and a profit driven business model should erase that 30-sec nonsense and increase ridership.

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is just an alarmist article. The dynamics of public transit use is much more complicated. Blaming a new transit option without real proof serves no one.

Most US cities have reduced service for all types of transit, this drives down PT use.

https://www.usnews.com/opinion/economic-intelligence/articles/2017-05-17/how-can-we-reverse-declining-public-transit-ridership

“The Mineta Transportation Institute recently found that even when you control for variables like low gas prices and the presence of other transportation options, service levels – how often a bus runs, how quickly – are still the number one predictor of bus ridership.

Many cities are running buses on routes that were designed decades ago. While these routes may have made sense for the make up of a particular city at that time, they may no longer provide the best service for riders. In light of this, cities like Seattle and Houston have totally redesigned their bus networks. They have shifted their focus to using technology and new routing tools to optimize the bus system (focusing limited resources on high capacity corridors, for example) and better customer service. Following in their footsteps is Baltimore, which is embarking on the first major bus route overhaul in decades.”

Jesus
Jesus

Glad you use logic to explain this. However, it would be nice to experiment with an option of outsourcing the company. Not privatization.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Outsourcing is a form of privatization.

rivardau
rivardau
outsourcing /contracting out = the “privatise the profits, socialise the losses” formula… I mean, if we as a society are willing to still pay for losses, then why should we give private profits to anyone else? Those private profits are not available to just anyone who wants to run the transit….it would have to be bidded out….and bid acceptance could only be done upon review of verifying that the bidding company has the capacity to handle it. this usually means that someone at the company gets connected to someone in the government, and thus leads to actions such as blocking non-qualifying companies (whether legitimately, or by creating such artificially high standards or tailor-making the bid so specific that only 1 or 2 companies can even be allowed), or lobbying (and we wonder why lobbyists are so stong in all levels of government), or outright graft and favouritism. Everytime a private company says they can do something for less….it is because they are shorting the employees’ pay!!!!!!! And, thus, rather than you thinkinkg that transit employees are paid too much and you might think to support them getting knocked down…. what you really need to ask yourself, is why YOUR OWN… Read more »
Oscar
Oscar

Which I could upvote rivardau’s comment more than once.

Market Urbanist
Market Urbanist

These are the same transit employees that don’t show up to work 20% of the time. Meanwhile, it is the taxpayers and low-income commuters who depend on public transit who suffer. The evidence is clear that the current system is highly ineffective and inefficient.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yes please!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Uber does not solve traffic, it causes traffic.

Anonymous
Anonymous

So does a bus that stops every 3 blocks blocking part or all of a traffic lane.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The bus and a car have the same capacity?

LongMIA
LongMIA

It’s not an issue of capacity, it’s about efficiency. Ride sharing is still in its infancy, and when it goes mainstream/UAV, it will reduce traffic significantly by reducing the actual number of vehicles on the road and more important, reducing the number of vehicles looking for parking spaces, which is a huge congestion generator in urban areas.

And yes, I read the recent coverage of Manhattan experiencing greater congestion thanks to a glut of ride-sharing vehicles.

Just remember we’re in a transition period.

mondocondo
mondocondo

That sounds like an interesting theory, but it seems that what Uber has actually accomplished is displacing what little public transportation Miami has! Talk about unintended consequences.
Cheers

Anonymous
Anonymous

When your public transportation is worthless, it’s easily displaced by other options.

That’s why so many people drive to begin with, and why traffic is so terrible.

Market Urbanist
Market Urbanist

I would argue that this is a good thing. That’s how free markets work; a poor product being replaced by something that is better at meeting consumer needs.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Or the Uber driver who stops in the street blocking traffic for pick-ups/drop-offs, and slows to a snails pace to find addresses (or riders) with no F’s given about the people behind him/her?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Buses don’t solve Miami Traffic problem!!!!! At least Uber keeps drunk drivers off the streets

mondocondo
mondocondo

Amen to that, drunk or otherwise impaired. Cheers.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Uber and Lift have put a dent in Metro ridership and will continue to do so. The reason is simple, people do not want to walk to a station in the humidity and heat of Miami, wait for the train to arrive in a platform with no air conditioning, only to have to walk again to where ever they are going. They rather pay a few more bucks and have a car pick them up and take them – door to door. The only time I take the Metro is if I am going to Dadeland Mall and that only happens a few times a year. For everything else I use Uber, the price is not bad if you are willing to share rides with other people.

rivardau
rivardau

Taxi companies have existed for decades that do this exact service already.

The principle of door-to-door pick up service has existed, even in the days of horse and carriages….

the only thing that has changed, it that uber/lyft offer a lower price for an existing service.

It is not the door-to-door aspect that is cutting into transit…..it is somehow that people are willing to pay uber/lyft/et al for something they were not willing to pay taxis for…

Anonymous
Anonymous

There are a lot of things better about Lyft/Uber than just the price.

Why are you defending taxis? LOL. That’s such an absurd thing to be fighting for.

Market Urbanist
Market Urbanist

The statement that taxi companies and rideshare provide the exact same service is illogical at best and absurd at worst, with all due respect. Not many people who have used both services would come to that conclusion, and consumer behavior over the past several years is evidence of this.

Anonymous
Anonymous

RE: the decline in bus ridership is not that severe because it has not factored in the folks who once took the bus-and paid for it-but now opt for the proliferation of gussied-up buses passed off as
“free” -the pseudo -trolleys.
If there were a way to add in the number of trolley riders the overall bus ridership decline would not be as severe.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Who ever you are, that’s correct O’mondo!

Miami
Miami

The public transportation in Miami is HORRIBLE!, only in Miami do they paint ENTIRE LANES for a bus that goes by every hour (AND NEVER ON TIME).

Marc306
Marc306

And every damn time I’ve driven by that new complete street in Downtown it’s a mess. People parked in the bus lane, FedEX parked in the bike lane. People have no clue how to drive in this city.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well Marc306, what can you say, that’s “Third World Mentality” for ya!

Anonymous
Anonymous

MDC has to focus on the daily commuter. Focus on the distance where taking an uber is price prohibitive. For example West Kendall to DT, which cost around $20-$25. At this price point people are not going to be willing to take an uber and would rather pay the $2.25 to ride the Metrorail. All other forms of Public Transit (Buses) is doomed due to Uber, other than transit that has it own right of way.

As mentioned in the above report express bus ridership grew 14%. This is the type of transit that need more funding and more infrastructure build out.

Anonymous
Anonymous

30 seconds is no big deal when the ride is free. Bus travel is so bad with Windows all blocked with ads…even the prison bus has normal Windows.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I don’t think Uber has much to do with it because it’s still more expensive. I live in Jacksonville and used it to go a few blocks and while it’s cheaper than a cab it was still expensive taking it everyday. People can’t take uber everyday they can’t afford it and public transportation is a lot more cheaper. So why would they think Uber is the cause? The only benefit I see to uber is convenience, not having to wait on the bus or train.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I had a friend staying on South Beach and was visiting me in Brickell. He took the bus over – $2.25.

On the way back, he was going to take the bus, however, he checked Uber and it was $5 and change to take Uber for probably 1/4 the time. Guess which one he did.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Maids and hotel towel boys aren’t gonna use something that over doubles the cost of them taking the bus to work every day.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Uber is just the scapegoat. The reality is that Miami Dade Transit is choked by union enforced incompetence and none of the politicians have the guts to take on an almost exclusively black union.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Maybe because buses are terrible? Why can’t the county understand we NEED Metrorail expansions to Miami Beach and Doral, and Tri-Rail to Kendall via the airport spur.

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is why Miami-Dade is not expanding public transportation.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Heck, people commenting on here think the bus and rail service in Miami is bad… try airports and passenger jets.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The 30 second comment is misleading and has nothing to do with the leadership of MDT.

The Metromover has always been slow because of it’s automated nature. Without an operator to open/close the doors, the automated system is extra cautious hence the long delay before closing doors and leaving.

Because of this, taking MM can sometimes take just as long as walking, or so it would seem.

Anonymous
Anonymous

It may be automated but the service is under real time tracking as well as on camera feeds at a command center. They know where every car is at all times. There never used to be 30 second delays before.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Have there been any lawsuits related to injuries on the Metro Mover?

If so, thank the lawyers.

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is not true. Miami-Dade Transit has refused to upgrade the software and hardware required to decrease wait times at Metromover. Mitsubishi-Hitachi offers to do so have been rejected a number of times.

BDub
BDub

15 or 20 seconds per stop should still be plenty. Especially if they fix the doors so they all operate, all of the time.
I know, asking for the moon.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Metromover delay could’ve been for train spacing? Besides, it’s not like no one has ever sat at a red light with no cross traffic to wait for.