Miami Mayor Unveils Plan To Revitalize Little Havana, Including New Zoning

A master plan to revitalize Little Havana has been unveiled by Miami mayor Francis Suarez.

The study took two years and analyzed 553 acres, according to Local 10 and WJCT.

Zoning changes and new parks are among the proposals.

Up to 10,000 new residences can be built without demolishing any existing buildings, the report states.

Plusurbia Design prepared the report.

 

(photo: phillip pessar)

 

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Anonymous

Develop all you want I just want to make sure they give design guidelines for new construction so the area can have some type of consistency and uniqueness.

marc

Yes, couldn’t agree more.

Anonymous

Please, this is 2019, leave the designs of the thirties and forties to the last century.

marc

Good thing historic districts in other cities didn’t listen to people like you. I enjoy going to them and you should allow future visitors of this city the same.

Anonymous

Maybe you have a reading comprehension problem. Where did I say “knock or bulldoze structures in any historic district, down?” My comment is made to the first poster who said “develop all you want I just want to make sure they give design guidelines for new construction so the area can have some type of consistency and uniqueness.” What I’m saying is, Little Havana is full of buildings designed in the thirties and forties and that’s fine for that era, but it wouldn’t make sense to handcuff these developers by making them blend in new 2000 century designed projects with 1900 designed projects. These developers know what their doing. Check out much older cities and see how new buildings get along just fine with older buildings.

Anonymous

Too bad “2000 century designed projects” usually translates to box with hideous cladding and a giant parking podium in Miami. We can have all the design guidelines we want, but if waivers are passed out like Halloween candy, what’s the point?

Anonymous

this a very smart, thought out posting, LISTEN!!!
Thank you

Anonymous

Coral Gables, Miami Beach, Upper Eastside/MiMo just to name a few. Preservation and design review(done right) add value.

Anonymous

Consistency AND uniqueness?

Anonymous

Pay it no attention… it sounded like something smart to say.

Anonymous

Yeah, constant design in the designated neighborhood, AND unique from other surrounding neighborhoods… Not rocket science.

Anonymous

People need to drive by 1 Glen Royal Pkwy to understand what you are referring to.

Anonymous

I feel like euro-style light rail would be great in little havana, especially with all the tourists around calle ocho

Anonymous

what about a trolley car? and buggies and horses like central park cause miami is so NYC

Anonymous

oh oh, you gonna get thumbs down for that…..

Anonymous

They need to make stricter rules for new developers. They need to maintain the same characteristics of the current architecture. This neighborhood is iconic to the city.

Anonymous

Can you please Describe the characteristics of the calle 8 current Architecture?
Don’t make the same mistake they made in the MiMo District where an irrelevant corner convenience store was treated like the Eiffel Tower in Paris resulting in a decade of total stagnation where nothing can be built because of the 35 Feet construction height restriction and 50% of the retail space remained empty for years

Anonymous

i agree with you – don’t know why people are down voting you… you are right… also, in MiMo the silly stupid thing is that architecture is mid century modern as you know – hence the name… and then the lighting they choose???? some syle from the 1800s victorian… who chose that? Miami wasn’t even around then… and then they plant tall trees right under electrial wires… Miami is lame

Anonymous

Perhaps you need to leave Miami if you say it’s lame???

Anonymous

Mainly Mediterranean revival and some MiMo

Some people understand preservation and guidelines for developers in unique neighborhoods adds overall value, even if it takes some time to achieve.

305

As much as I would like to see similar architectural styles replicated in Little Havana, the massing of the buildings is much more critical. The architecture could be whatever it wants to be so long as new buildings follow the form of their neighbors.

We need more mid-size, one or two lot sized apartment buildings and fewer large assemblages. The problem is the idiot mega-developers in Miami. Anything that isn’t an assemblage with a giant building and parking podium is seemingly off the table for them. Meanwhile they keep land banking in Little Havana, trying to create their assemblages and pricing out the smaller guys.

There are one or two developers in the neighborhood who have a clue. They’ve done some successful smaller buildings. There are some incentives to doing smaller-scale (beyond it being the right thing for the neighborhood) such as the parking exemption, lower construction costs (think no elevator/fire rated stairs) and thus easier financing.

Anonymous

A lot of people need to realize that the discussion about development in Miami happened years ago because of the imposed Urban Development Boundary Line. During that discussion, it was agreed that due to the increasing shortage of land, projects in Miami have no choice but to be designed higher than the 1950’s and 60’s three story height that was okay for that time. This city must discard the old ways of looking at doing things and fearing development that are not models of the past which are frankly redundant and should be left in the past.

Oscar

There is currently more than 500 million sq. ft. of vacant, unused, or underutilized land in Miami-Dade County WITHIN the Urban Development Boundary. The UDB is needed to protect important ecosystems and our vital water supply. Despite what developers looking to build more suburbs on cheap land will tell you, we are a long way away from running out of land within the UDB.

Anonymous

That would make sense if you were talking about land for more sprawling housing suburbs, but in the city of Miami, that concept doesn’t apply. Do some research from past articles in the Miami Herald on the topic about land in the city of Miami and how it should be developed in the future.

Anonymous

I agree with both points, which I think can coexist, scaled size buildings and design.

Anonymous

same architecture? and that is? plain store fronts with no style or design? yeah yeah simmer down

Anonymous

Yep!.. just like the one story third world grafitti painted crap you see in Wynwood.

Anonymous

Have you ever driven around little Havana. The neighborhoods is not all on Calle 8

Anonymous

I don’t see it folks.
I only see half ass apt bldgs and hideous little strip malls that are crying for a wrecking ball.
Well, with a few exceptions

Anonymous

Hmmm… you’re onto something there.

marc

I agree there are plenty of empty lots just sitting there waiting to get developed.

Anonymous

They should make that part of 8th street in front of Ball and Chain pedestrian only at least on the weekends.

Anonymous

definitely. at the very least, widen the sidewalks and not have 3 lanes of traffic

Anonymous

Great idea! i like it!

Anonymous

You’re crazy

Anonymous

How about start with something simple. Create an inner loop for the little Havana trolley that will go west on 7th st then back east on 1st street.

Anonymous

how about NO

Anonymous

That’s quite a big colorful cock on that little Havana corner.

Anonymous

And who doesn’t like a colorful big cock? Lol

Anonymous

Racists don’t.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

It was a joke. You must be sooo fun at parties.

Anonymous

i like black cock

Anonymous

Oh please
Not again with racism.

Anonymous

Your mom loves it

Anonymous

wait until you see mine!!!

Anonymous

Show me.
I’d love to see it

Anonymous

Is mass transit included? East West Line on Flagler and/or SW 8th?

Anonymous

i think the mayor is kind of hot. i’d get down with him in a pinch. he’s sexy and he has big feet. need i say more?

Anonymous

Where have you seen his feet?

Anonymous

Hell yes
Why did you think I voted for him?

305

We need more “missing middle” housing in this area! There’s tons of smaller “missing middle” apartment buildings existing, but most are in such bad shape. Some, however, are beautiful.
We need fewer mega-developer assemblages and more fine-grain type development. With the ample street parking and almost all of Little Havana falling in the parking-exemption zone, these types of 10,000sf or less buildings are perfect to keep the scale and charm of the neighborhood while also providing much needed density and new housing stock.

Anonymous

What is, “missing middle housing?”

Anonymous

Problem is if you build that the price will quickly skyrocket since the area is such a short commute to Brickell and Gables. Then it won’t be missing middle housing anymore, it will just be more high end housing.

The only way to keep hosing prices down enough to be middle, is to have a built in “2 hour commute”. So look to Homestead and Kendall for your missing middle. Cause Shenendoah and Little Havana are going to be the next chic East Gables/West Brickell neighborhoods with where they are located.

Anonymous

Totally agree.
Shenandoah is one of the most underrated nabes in the county with plenty of cute homes and close to everything

Anonymous

“Up to 10,000 new residences can be built without demolishing any existing buildings, the report states.”

The thing is, many existing buildings are owned by speculators/slumlords, and get demolished by neglect and the land sold off in assemblages. It’s important to designate neighborhoods like Grove Park to the north, Shenandoah to the south, and Riverside Heights (Lawrence Estates Land Company, Beacom Manor, Glen Royal, etc. as historic districts, and incentivize restoration by selling TDRs for infill development on all the vacant assemblages east of NW 8th Avenue and along major streets, while encouraging existing buildings also in this area to be restored and adaptively reused (1920s Mission-style apartment houses as boutique hotels, Mediterranean Revival and Dade County Pine Folk Victorian homes as restaurants and clubhouses for new development, etc.). Otherwise, you get another Edgewater or West Brickell, lined with parking garages and self-storage facilities at street level.

Anonymous

Great news! So every building will be required to have a chicken element reflected in the design?Hope we can get a whole chicken shaped building like the guitar shaped Hard Rock! So great that one person can revise the Miami 21 code that thousands worked to develop. Perfectly demonstrates who still runs Miami!

Anonymous

I’m Just laughing at the second picture of the Rooster LoL Rooster is posing and all lmaoo

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

It took two years to figure this out? It’s literally the same answers for every major neighborhood revitalization. Jesus Christ, get a clue people. It ain’t that hard to figure out.

Anonymous

Great ideas but when will there be change? How much will it cost? Is this just fluff?

Anonymous
Miami

Did anyone actually walk Little Havana before making this report? There are ways we can make Little Havana a good place to visit. It has potential, it is not “good”. Lets aim for quality, not sub-par.

Anonymous

Rooters walking around in the streets of Little Havana?.. I don’t think Cubans allowed that kind of farm looking third world crap.