Miami Not Building Enough Housing To Match National Average

There’s lots of construction cranes in the Miami skyline right now, but the metro area as a whole still isn’t building enough new housing to match the national average, according to a new report.

Inspection Support Network analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Building Permit Survey and Zillow’s Home Value Index for the study.

For every 1,000 existing homes in the Miami metro area, 9.9 new housing units were authorized in 2021, compared to 12.5 new units nationally, the report showed.

The Miami Metro area is unusual in that it has essentially run out of new developable land in all directions, thanks to borders that include the Everglades National Park and Atlantic Ocean.

Demand for housing has been outstripping supply, leading to soaring prices.

Instead of expanding with new suburbs as in other metro areas, developers in Miami have been building vertically – but it still isn’t enough to match the national average, the report shows.

 

79 Comments
most voted
newest oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Urbanist
5 months ago

Miami needs to take a hard look at land around existing MetroRail and allow 24-36 floor buildings within a half mile of all stations.

Hialeah Station is zoned for single family, which is a waste for the millions invested in transit.

MIA
5 months ago

Best comment I’ve read in months.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Except two-thirds of the comments on here demand Hialeah prices in Brickell. The other third believe extending Metrorail to Homestead is a good idea.

Checo
4 months ago

The people in Miami Dade County leadership and developers have already been doing this for the last decade, which is why you see 1,000’s of new housing units when (if) you ride the Metrorail.

BikeLad
4 months ago

Single Family Zoning shouldn’t even be a thing within Miami proper. Building more of them is throwing gasoline on the already extreme housing market.

Azarius
5 months ago

They need to run the MetroRail to Homestead and build vertical 15 minute mini cities along the line, this would improve housing and quality of life

Melo is sigma and chad
5 months ago

yeah along the existing bus route downtown they’re plenty of empty lots near it that could have mid size apartments. to save money this part of a extend metrorail could be at street level.

Azarius
5 months ago

Street level would interfere with local traffic flows let’s not add stress to a area that’s to become more congested with more residents and retail/commercial products

Anonymous
5 months ago

run the MetroRail to homestead and Build mini cities along the line ? that would be very nice but it would take about 30 years to do that

Anonymous
5 months ago

Best to get started right away then.

Anonymous
5 months ago

MetroRail to homestead ? they are building a BRT to florida city which should open next year if ridership is high we will get rail to south miami dade county

Anonymous
5 months ago

So you want to encourage sprawl by extending Metrorail through a rural area, while countless proposed lines through walkable underutilized areas are still in the books but were never built? Metrorail’s first priority extension should be to Miami Beach, followed by along West 37th Avenue from Miami Airport to Douglas Road Station, and then a west extension to FIU or Doral. The only southern extension should be to The Falls, and then west through Kendall, redeveloping shopping centers with mixed-use development with high-density residential.

Checo
4 months ago

Miami Beach??
Is that because there are no people in the City of Miami Beach and they could use some economic development?
Because the City of Miami Beach hotels are empty?

So I guess the pitch to the City of South Miami taxpayer goes like this:

TNM Pontificator: WE NEED a Metrorail to Miami Beach!!!
Taxpayer: Huh? isn’t the City of Miami Beach doing great with full buses, a robust
tax base, record tourism, and a A+ Credit rating?
TNM Pontificator: Yes, but buses do not suit my lifestyle.
Taxpayer: Huh? You want me to pay for your lifestyle? I am already paying a lot
of money to the county to pay for the buses that work perfectly fine.
I’m okay with that…people sometimes need public transit, and I’m okay
helping out anyone who NEEDS help.
TNM Pontificator: But WE WANT sleek stylish Metrorail trains like I see in the movies.
Taxpayer: Yeah…well okay. Why don’t you go do the math on how much it costs
to build today (add 50% for the inevitable cost overruns), figure out
how much it cost each year to run it (add 50% for the inevitable cost
overruns), divide those numbers by the cost per rider and figure out if
there are enough of the “WE NEEDS” who would pay the costs so that a
4 mile Metromover extension to the beach.
TNM Pontificator: Ummm….math makes my head hurt.
Taxpayer: Understood. It seems to me that millions of people seem to get to and
from the City of Miami Beach each year without any problem. Why
should people in Kendall, or Coral Gables, or Doral pay for it? In other
words, if this is such a good idea, and the people of the City of Miami
Beach want to pay for this new Metrorail, why don’t they vote for it or
pay for it?
TNM Pontificator: The people of Miami Beach have already voted to reject it even with
Miami-Dade County footing most of the bill…..oh…I mean…because….
because…..Fair Share….or Systemic Inequality…or something like that.

Fern
4 months ago

God, this is truly a childish comment. Really putting that “inventing a guy to get mad at” routine to the next level

Checo
4 months ago

That is a want.
Not a need.

Paul
4 months ago

Cutler Ridge Mall redevelopment is currently being planned.

If the site was developed with the same density as Dadeland, it could support up to 20,000 new homes, and Metrorail expansion to the site would be relatively easy as the County already owns the right-of-way.

But Cutler Bay NIMBYs are already fighting it so we will see…

Joe CARollo
5 months ago

Blame Mana for land banking downtown and thank Melo for actually delivering thousands of units.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Yes. Plus Melo has shown that a developer can be very successful building high rise housing without being ultra high-end.

Anonymous
5 months ago

You know when Melo builds it’s the catalyst for change

Anonymous
5 months ago

Except Manlet’s land is prime real estate for luxury housing in the historic downtown core, assuming the neighborhood improves whenever he’s gone.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Need a mix…can’t all be luxury

Fern
5 months ago

We need to tax land far higher. Property taxes should be lowered in exchange. Lowers the incentives for sitting on empty land

Checo
4 months ago

You can continue to present your solution to a problem that does not exist, but it shouldn’t gain any traction.

Private property ownership is pillar of our civilized society.

Stripping away private property rights by the government is not healthy, no matter what dopey professor is advocating for it. When the government confiscates your private property (land, money, labor, etc.) it is a drag on the economy and discouraging to investors.

Fern, you may have to dig and research a little to find this, but it turns out that 1201 Brickell Bay Drive sold for a really really big number and it will be developed. Along the way, the owners paid 10’s of millions of dollars to the schools and the county based on the value of the land.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Relatively low hanging fruit are those shopping centers with massive parking lots. Build garages with apartments on them.

Melo is sigma and chad
5 months ago

There still plenty of empty lots or abandon buildings in overtown and up 7th ave. Also for metrorail stations like trirail, hialeah, Okeechobee and palmetto (literally all the Hialeah metrorail stations) there isn’t much density next to them.

Azarius
5 months ago

Yes but building more housing away from the urban core would be less expensive to build (lands cheaper) and more affordable. Anything east of 95 and above Sw 26th rd is considered prime land and no developers want to build anything less than luxury housing to get their money worth too many hot areas and attractions in close proximity, gotta pay for that. That’s just the reality of things. Plus I rather have more sqft for less

Anonymous
5 months ago

Overtown should start building fast!

Mm305
4 months ago

Don’t forget little Havana, lots of empty lots on the interior of 8th and Flagler, up zone that garbage and watch it grow. No more character preservation which is another form of racial, cultural and ethnic exclusion.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Too many empty lots. Let’s build more and more and faster please!!

Downtown Blue Voter
5 months ago

Besides the Metrorail stations, there are plenty of vacant lots at the NW 2nd, 7th , 12th, and 17th Av. corridors that can be easily rezoned and redeveloped. A light rail on NW 7th connecting the new Golden Gate intermodal center with Downton Miami will help increment the density in the area.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Why build light rail right at the edge of I-95 and connect to Golden Glades? It needs to penetrate through neighborhoods with walkable access to stops. We already learned park-and-ride does little for solving transit issues.

Downtown Boob Voter
5 months ago

Why don’t you ask your Joey Boy for more “infrastructure” money that won’t go to it?

MINDSET
5 months ago

Yeah.. it would’ve been done Rickie tick!

Oh, I forgot he sucked up and marched to his party’s politics and refused “infrastructure money” that would’ve helped towards solving a lot of our transit issues.

Anonymous
4 months ago

Agree. Allapattah has three metro stations with dozens of vacant lots or “car dealership” empty lots. Also easy access to bus routes.17th ave, 12th, and 7th, also nw 36th street.

Manny
5 months ago

I ride the metro rail every day and see new development planned or starting around these Hialeah stations. Land clearing project happening at ok echo we station. Curious to see if it becomes a housing development like once planned. Definitely need to see more density around the Hialeah metro rail corridor. Single family zoning around transit needs to go.

Kas
5 months ago

The Village of Pinecrest would like a word with you.

zzz
5 months ago

f- pinecrest

Checo
4 months ago

Pinecrest is pretty crazy…there are dopey people opening up their circular driveways to set up “Petition Signing Stations” to “SAVE” Pinecrest from multifamily development.

Imagine someone’s 2 acre home with 2 gates and a circular driveway, with a half a dozen Karen’s trying to SAVE their neighborhood from apartment dwellers who want great schools for their kids.

Anonymous
4 months ago

They hate a communist style government but they act like they’re communist.

Checo
4 months ago

True Manny. Why there isn’t more is beyond my belief.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Manā! Are you reading this?

nobody
5 months ago

he’s too busy looking at new properties to buy and promptly neglect, maybe graffiti this on the side of a wall.

Fern
5 months ago

As long as we have as much single-family zoning as we do we won’t ever be build enough housing. All of the metrorail corridor needs to be rezoned and everything along tri-rail. Removing parking minimums and allowing single-stair buildings will also help.

Gentrification Now
5 months ago

A good start would be relaxing the enfermo is amount of blight in Little Havana and Overtown.

Gentrification Now
5 months ago

* Edit for typos *

A good start would be razing the enormous amount of blight in Little Havana and Overtown.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Except for Little Havana/Riverside, how about keeping the historic prewar architecture, using historic designation for restoring them into boutique hotels and apartments, and selling the air rights for taller buildings to replace the junk and vacant assemblages between and throughout other locations in the city?

Checo
4 months ago

Sounds like the MiMo District plan.
talk about a lame, unwalkable neighborhood.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Miami has not run out of land to build new housing. the problem could be that we don’t have enough developers that want to construct buildings. a lot of them want to build single family homes, the reason could be that is more profitable for them. we need more developers like Melo that can build high rises quickly and affordable.

Anon
5 months ago

this is insane. A developer would much rather build multifamily (10s, 100s of units at once) instead of Single family homes one by one. This is not the problem.

Anonymous
5 months ago

insane ? not it’s not insane to say that some developers think that building single families is more profitable for them. there is more demand for single family homes , single family homes appreciate more and have lower vacancy rates.

Anonymous
5 months ago

It’s also the only thing that’s legal to build in the majority of this county/country. That needs to change.

BDub
5 months ago

The county doesn’t have vast tracks of developable land to sprawl into.

Checo
4 months ago

“The county”?
There are private land owners who own 10;s of thousands of acres of AG land that could be developed.

Anonymous
5 months ago

No problem, just keep reshaping and rebuilding areas in and near downtown for now. Brickell, the Design District, Edgewater, Wynwood, etc, etc, etc…

Anonymous
5 months ago

Affordable housing should be built far from the core

Anonymous
5 months ago

You mean poor people shouldn’t live downtown in a waterfront property with doorman, gym and pool?

Fern
5 months ago

That would lead to a heck of a lot of cars on the road. And poor people deserve access to the city as well. The best solution is build enough housing till supply leads to falling prices

Anonymous
5 months ago

^^^ I think the sentiment is that affordable housing doesn’t belong on prime real estate. I wouldn’t go as far as saying “far from the core” but it certainly shouldn’t be on waterfront lots.

Checo
4 months ago

Article = Not good.

For starters, no thinking person builds Miami housing to keep up with the 2021 National Average of new homes built per 1,000 across the USA. Thinking people build housing to serve current and future housing demand in the market where they are building.

Secondly, Miami did not stop building in 2019, 2020, or 2021. The rate of new housing units (condos, apartments, and houses) has been increasing significantly according to Yardi Matrix data. The metros that are up 40% probably has more to do with how low they were in 2019 than how much more they are developing in 2020, the article does not break that down. A simple trailing 5 year average would be helpful if the goal was to get to the truth about responsible housing development.

Thirdly, the two reports conflated for the “Inspection Support Network” interchange Single Family Residences and New Housing Units. The 1,000+ unit One Southside Park does not fit into their data sets in a meaningful way because these are rental housing units and not starter single family houses. For perspective, the #1 metro in this report is Austin TX: Total new housing units authorized (2019): 32,037. Miami-Dade County (not counting the Metropolitan Statistical Area) will have delivered 18,000 by the end of this year, and the pipeline for deliveries in 2023 is larger than that.

The TNM writing takes the bad writing to higher level (nothing personal), but “The Miami Metro area is unusual in that it has essentially run out of new developable land in all directions, thanks to borders that include the Everglades National Park and Atlantic Ocean.”

“Run out of new developable land”!?!?!?
“Thanks to borders…”

Consistency would require to either say the Everglades and the Ocean, or chose to say the Everglades National Park and the Biscayne Bay National Park, but never mind that. Both the ocean and the Everglades were here before we were, and so was the land. There is no such thing as “new land” even if you think about filling in submerged land, it is still land.

There are 10’s of thousands of undeveloped acres in Miami-Dade County, and there are areas around transit that are still underdeveloped to the tune of well over 100,000 housing units.

Melo’s pájaro nalgon
4 months ago

Little Haiti, Opa Locka, liberty square and Hialeah….sorry but they gotta go. Pay the residents off and start constructing medium density housing with public transportation. Similar to European cities. This single family bs is not for a place like Miami.

Michael
5 months ago

Part of the problem is that some older suburbs have become encapsulated in the Infill Area, but many residents there still fight infill development.

Ana
4 months ago

Cough cough little Havana, spring gardens, overtown and the roads.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Is this a blessing or a curse?

Joe Robbie
5 months ago

No undeveloped land but thousands of empty lots(including downtown) and surface parking lots.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Growth needs to also be continue to move north up the coast with transportation alternatives such as Brightline.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Metromover!

Anonymous
5 months ago

When the FEC already exists for Brightline and Tri-Rail Coastal Link? Something tells me you want a free electric shortbus, even though it’ll take an hour to get to the county line, notwithstanding breakdowns.

MINDSET
5 months ago

That’s still quicker than a Brightline train that you’ll be inconvenienced on for hours when the police have to do another investigation because of a train/car collision due to some knuckle dragger again.

Checo
4 months ago

“Shortbus” is the operative word.

MM305
4 months ago

The thing no one is talking about is that Miami Dade County lost about 33k people so far this year. And yet we have a deficit of housing. The housing demand is through the roof in Brickell and the surrounding neighborhoods… and is minimal outside the urban corridor. That tell the whole story. YOU HAVE TO HAVE MAJOR UPZONING IN THE URBAN CORRIDOR! The idea of saving a culture or character of a neighborhood is going to destroy cities from the inside out. WE have to have some gentrification and capital infusion or disaster is ahead.

Anonymous
5 months ago

Almost the entirety of Miami-Dade is zoned exclusively for single-family homes. Maybe it’s time we consider rezoning (jk, that time was 30 years ago)

Anonymous
4 months ago

So I guess you’re one of the “wealthy, talented, and employed” in the magic city?

Anonymous
4 months ago

Yes!!

Ao1
4 months ago

Miami has not run out of developable land because of the UDB and the Everglades. It has run out of developable land because of the giant swaths of urban core zoned as single family residential.

pol
4 months ago

the city needs to up zone the multi family areas of little Havana.

Miami
4 months ago

LET THE DEVELOPERS BUILD

Anonymous
5 months ago

“For every 1,000 existing homes in the Miami metro area, 9.9 new housing units were authorized in 2021, compared to 12.5 new units nationally, the report showed”

Haha, now that cheering crowd that we always see on this site have to put their pon pons down.

Checo
4 months ago

Not exactly Mr. Anonymous.
The people here who understand real estate sniffed out how horrible this article was in about 20 seconds.
People who understand real estate are VERY bullish on Miami multi-fam development, and the announcement just keep coming.

Anonymous
4 months ago

Maybe you don’t understand Checo.. a lot of people don’t care about how “bullish” some developers are when it comes to multi-family development, no, they think Miami is on top, and that’s why you always see this one poster on this site who’s always making the comment “Miami winning.”