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Miami Produce Center Special Area Plan Submitted, With Design By Bjarke Ingels

Miami Produce Center Special Area Plan Submitted, With Design By Bjarke Ingels

Miami Produce Center LLC, controlled by Robert Wennett, has submitted a Special Area Plan to build a mixed-use complex.

Bjarke Ingels is the architect.

The project will include:

  • 860,000 square feet of residential
  • 231,000 square feet of office
  • 114,000 square feet of hotel
  • 76,000-square-foot school
  • 75,000 square feet of retail
  • 1,149 parking spaces

In total, 1.36 million square feet is planned over 8.54 acres.

Wennet paid $16 million for the property in 2016.

The submission was first reported by The Real Deal.

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Anonymous
Anonymous

Can only hope the actual build resembles the renderings…very unique look!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

If it’s Bjarke Ingles, it probably will. Look at some of his other work around the world, like Zaha Hadid, Santiago Calatrava and Frank Gehry, it’s not exactly plain and standard looking fare.

( . )( . )
( . )( . )

These are pre-schematic renderings that aim at tackling massing, planning and prelim financial/cost issues. The aesthetics are a consideration but really an early stab of what this can be. This design will be altered because of many factors, however, you have the vantage of a skilled team (developer/architect) that are committed to doing not stored, predictable and trendy solutions that you would have seen from the likes of the local architects (Arquitectonica, Stantec, Kobe Karp, Zyschovich…etc).

Comrade
Comrade

This has a Soviet style monument to the revolution look to it ( https://www.businessinsider.com.au/crazy-soviet-buildings-from-the-mid-20th-century-2016-5#/#this-resort-in-ukraine-combines-two-late-soviet-architectural-trends-constructing-things-off-the-ground-and-buildings-that-look-slightly-like-ufos-9 ).

They tried this in Cuba, and now they will build this in Miami, the land where the Cuban dispora landed…how ironic.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The Soviet era design looks really cool. Better design and more density

suomynona
suomynona

Weird design. Not my preference. But not my money, and I don’t have to live there.

It’s along a rail corridor and close to an employment hub (the hospitals), so that’s always a good thing.

Anonymous
Anonymous

If this ever gets built it would transformational. Allapattah will become the next Midtown. With Dominican heardressers and pan con lechón.

marc
marc

Mejor Pan Con Lechon on 17th is the shiznit.

Anonymous
Anonymous

… and not far from the real Midtown Miami.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Don’t worry. By then, Dominicans will be necessarily displaced.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Fantastic!!!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Amazing. What a vision!

Anonymous
Anonymous

I hear a lot of complaints from people who are not in the business always complaining about the greed and the lack of vision most developers have. Let this project be a lesson. Robert Wennett is one of the best we have in this town. With that being said I kind of hate Ingles on a personal level, but this is good work.

Anonymous
Anonymous

to continue… this is not a developer who strictly just sticks to numbers and turns the project over to the architect or builder without a clue. This is a developer that knows the craft of building and design and its so refreshing to see a developer roll up their sleeves with the design team and make it happen, rather than the typical top down approach. This project is as much a result of the skills of a great development team as much as the skills of the designers.

Anonymous
Anonymous

So the developer buys land and hires one of the Best Architects at the moment and he’s a visionary?
I would give the credit to the Architect rather. Yes, the developer will spend more, but he’s also capitalizing on the success and recognition the firm BIG brings.

Anonymous
Anonymous

maybe so. I saw this particular developer lecture at UM school of architecture where he went over his process. This is where I based most of my comment from. I am not necessarily discrediting the architect but if you saw that lecture you would know how involved this guy gets and his understanding of design. He is as much a part of the project as the architect. you should check it out I believe they have a video online of the lecture.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Sounds interesting, I’ll give it a search.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Agree with you about Ingles… but this does look cool. I’m assuming the decision to lift everything off the ground (except parking garage) is due to planning for future flooding?

Anonymous
Anonymous

it’s less about him really and more about the hype he receives and the culture of celebrity he fosters. to each their own. i hate the “selfie-tecture” culture going around, some of it is over the top just for sake of being over the top. but this is a good project in the balance and restraint and well rooted in soviet constructivism with a tropical vibe. it’s a great project really.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Ingels

Anonymous
Anonymous

I’m sure Ingles knows you hate him and He cares a lot!

Anonymous
Anonymous

maybe more specifically i hate the culture of celebrity that he caters to and fosters. probably less about him really. even though your comment was more about being hateful than any kind of real discussion and doesn’t merit response.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“With that being said I kind of hate Ingles on a personal level”
You are right, doesn’t merit response.

Anonymous
Anonymous

wow. game changer

Anonymous
Anonymous

overused statement.

A. Nonymous
A. Nonymous

I’d love it if they could make room for the produce companies somehow.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Looks similar to the Interlace in Singapore…I love this design and idea… but as we all know this is Miami and some how some way they will get denied.

Dolly
Dolly

How about a little setback from the streets to allow for planting trees that will provide canopy to help purify the air, lower the temperature and look good?

Anonymous
Anonymous

I’m gonna miss watching the action on the loading bays here. Pallets forklifts trucks and hardworking people….all replaced by millennials

Polo
Polo

Cool looking buildings.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I think they’re dreaming with their zoning request. But then again that might be a negotiating tactic.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Designed by BIG…Build it ASAP!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Are those Cat 5 prove ?

Anonymous
Anonymous

*proof

Anonymous
Anonymous

great looking project and great concept, with school and all included, it will be transforming for the area, lets hope it gets built.

Jose G Martin
Jose G Martin

Medical staff in the Jackson’s area will be all over it. The medical district has a lot of transit of people who come and live around Jackson Memorial. They will have no problems finding people who would live there. I wouldn’t, but I know there is a need for it.

Miami Realist
Miami Realist

Awesome! Hope it gets approve soon.

Anonymous
Anonymous

approved

Anonymous
Anonymous

On stilts.
A nod to rising sea levels?

Anonymous
Anonymous

I used to buy produce there for my assisted living facilities in my pick up truck. When I would leave there packed with produced I would be stopped on the street and everyone would ask me how much I was selling produce for…lol

Anonymous
Anonymous

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN MIAMI. I’M SO LOST!!!!

SRS
SRS

community college look….

Anonymous
Anonymous

Doubt this happens.

Anonymous
Anonymous

TBH, it looks kind of boring and ugly for BIG.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Expected more from this proposal.

1150 parking spaces? How about a network of bike lanes so that people can travel to/from Downtown, Midtown, Little Havana, Brickell, and Miami Beach?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Maybe one day people like you will start thinking and make sense, and let me explain what I’m talking about. This developer presents a rendering of what he’s proposing for this land he purchased. Now from this article, you complain about the proposed parking spaces in this project and one can only assume, expect these developers to somehow conceptualize your dream of these bike lanes that people can “travel to/from Downtown, Midtown, Little Havana, Brickell, and Miami Beach.” Really?.. how presumptuous of you.

You wrote “Expected more from this proposal.”

You mean to tell us you already knew about this project and this developer disappointed YOU?

Anonymous
Anonymous

By “Expected more” I meant from the architect.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You’re kidding right? This is the same architect that designed the twisting Grove at Grand Bay towers. You’re saying that the design of project is not contemporary of Bjarke Ingels?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Expected more in terms of vision. Instead we have a large % of the SF devoted to automobile storage.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“automobile storage?”

You do know that “automobile storage” is it’s own and a completely different business right?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Didn’t you know that he is the head of Miami’s Architectural and Urban Planning Department? Nothing can’t be built in this town without his approval.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The one thing you guys fail to realize time and time again is parking spaces and parking pedestals have zero to do with the developer. It’s a requirement not an option, do you really think these developer care if you can park your car or not? If it was up to them they wouldn’t spend the extra money building parking spaces. The Miami infrastructure was built with cars in mind not rail like New York. Without parking spaces what are you going to do? We don’t have a rail system like other cities so you can’t just abandon your car until we have a solution in place.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“the one thing you guys fail to realize time and time again is parking spaces and parking pedestals have zero to do with the developer.”

Developers absolutely have say in this. They can lobby to have the parking minimums changed. Or they can ask.

Just as this developer is asking to go from industrial zoning to residential/commercial.

Plus it’s near a metro rail station.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You are obviously delusional if you think people in Miami with the texting and phone chatting going on will be safe to ride their bikes from downtown or anywhere in the county to this project.
For what?
For what purpose?
This is not Amsterdam, we don’t have the weather to ride bike to/from work unless you expect to have a shower with clean clothes at your destination. Moreover, how long do you think it takes to travel by bike from Miami Beach or Brickell to this project?
We live on a city that was built for the automobile. Our dimensions are not human scale, they are Highway scale. Again I go back to my first statement. YOu are delusional…

marc
marc

FYI from Downtown- 18, Brickell- 22 minutes, from South Beach- 30.

aceraroja
aceraroja

Weird, because I routinely commute from downtown to the Design District on bike and it takes me a full 15 minutes. To the Beach down the Venetian, 20. Coral Gables, 25. The distances are actually quite small. Europe is just as hot in the summer as here and they are barely air conditioned, so the sweat problem is worse. But you’re right, it isn’t safe for people less fit than regular cyclists. That’s why… we need better bike infrastructure.

Not that the parking built in condos has anything to do with bike lanes. They’re mandated and economically necessary in a city with poor alternative transit options. I hate that but it’s true.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Sure, Europe gets hot two months during the summer season, on average 23 days out of the summer season get sweltering with less humidity. Can you really compare Europe’s weather to Miami?

marc
marc

I ride my bike from Coral Gables to the Civic Center area every day. 25 minutes. Save money in parking, putting mileage on my car as well as gas. Only drive if I’m running late or it’s raining in the morning. Feels good