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Miami Produce Center To Include Urban Farming, Manufacturing-Enabled Retail

Miami Produce Center To Include Urban Farming, Manufacturing-Enabled Retail

Robert Wennett’s plan to rebuild the Miami Produce Center may be among the most unique redevelopment projects in America.

A new description from architect Bjarke Ingels, along with an analysis of the developer’s zoning application, reveals just how innovative the design is.

The redeveloped Produce Center will include urban farming plots (either between buildings or on “roofscapes,”) co-living spaces with flexible rental periods and sharing bathroom and kitchens.

There will also be galleries selling art made on site, and manufacturing facilities with retail storefronts, allowing goods to be both made and sold on site.

Here’s a description provided by architect BIG:

Located in the center of the industrial district of Allapattah, Miami Produce creates a new destination for the city while retaining the neighborhood’s industrial character. The architecture is conceived as a three-dimensional urban framework, designed with large industrial-sized floor plates to provide maximum programmatic flexibility. The site will be activated by urban farming, restaurants, storefronts, co-working offices, co-living apartments and educational programming. At the ground floor, a series of existing produce warehouses will be restored and re-programmed to create a vibrant public realm while preserving the industrial spirit of the neighborhood. Between the warehouses, three public spaces will exhibit a variety of lush landscapes that create diverse microclimates and allow the buildings’ programs to extend outdoors. A stack of linear buildings will float above the existing warehouses, generating a large urban courtyard at the center while forming gateways that open to the surrounding context. On top of each building, programmed ‘roofscapes’ extend the public realm vertically and capture stunning views of downtown Miami and surrounding neighborhoods.

The Special Area Plan submitted as part of the project also includes the following definitions, which aren’t standard in the Miami 21 zoning code:

  • Manufacturing-Enabled Retail: A facility primarily engaged in the manufacturing, processing, or assembly of goods and shall include on-premises retail sales.
  • Art Gallery: A place of business primarily engaged in the display and sale of art work created on or off site, with works available for immediate purchase and removal from the premises.
  • Privately-owned Public Open Space: A publicly accessible area on a private Lot that exceeds minimum Open Space requirements and shall be provided as a Civic Space Types standard… This area shall be in connection with a ground floor Commercial Use.
  • Co-Living Dwelling: Two or more Dwelling Units occupied on a rental basis for a flexible period of time having shared sanitary and/or kitchen facilities.
  • Urban Garden: A structure or area of land, said area consisting of up to one acre in size, used to grow and harvest food or non-food crops for personal food production, commercial uses, donation, or educational purposes.

David Snow, Miami’s chief of urban design, told CoStar that he was impressed with the design, which includes restoration of existing buildings.

“It’s always our intent to have as little disruption to existing neighborhoods as possible while at the same time making enhancements to those public environments,” he said.

Planners are now administratively reviewing the proposal, which will also need approval from several Miami Boards, along with the city commission.

 

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Anonymous
Anonymous

Truly visionary and will undoubtedly enhance the neighborhood

Anonymous
Anonymous

Awesome concept. Miami needs at least 5 more of this!

Anonymous
Anonymous

The idea that the project combines low and high uses into a cohesive whole is groundbreaking.

Anonymous
Anonymous

something unique, new, original. wonderful for miami

Anonymous
Anonymous

I’d love to see this revitalize the neighborhood to the north creating a focal point and connecting it with Santa Clara Station.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I’m ok with the stilts over original build design now,and I support the parking block over the church now on biscayne

Anonymous
Anonymous

I don’t see “restoration of existing buildings” here worth it. The proposal at 1836 Biscayne Boulevard is however an atrocity.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I agree. If built, it will become a permanent set piece for every movie comedy made in Miami, i.e, Bill Murray, playing Hunter Thompson again, can’t focus on the nearly naked woman next to him waiting for an Uber driver as he keeps glancing up at the building floating over the church. Of course the upside is that it will be Miami’s first truly iconic building because anyone who sees it will not soon forget it or where they saw it.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Great project with very creative notes. I think it will be great for the area and will give Miami a design perspective.

Anonymous
Anonymous

game changer!!! love it!

Anonymous
Anonymous

The building program reminds me of Sesc Pompeia by Lina Bo Bardi, it’s a flexible shell for arts, entertainment, and activity.

Conga
Conga

This is so not happening…please!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

I live in a highrise and it moves during a hurricane, how do the engineers expect this to survive.

Anonymous
Anonymous

By engineering.

Anonymous
Anonymous

On those pillars

Anonymous
Anonymous

Movement is needed. The more rigid a structure is the higher the strength requirements. Your building is fine.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Remove the parking and we can talk.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Ok cool well if you ever plan on visiting tell us how your going to get there from your house? I’ll wait… do you have a station within walking distance of your house?

Anonymous
Anonymous

Theres a metrorail station next to it and the person visiting could catch a bus and then the metrorail.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Or if the City/ County could paint bike lanes, you could ride your bike.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You will get an Express lane before a you get bike lane.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Don’t bother with these people. Don’t forget they have no clue as to the reality that this is a city built for the automobile. Unfortunately, this is true and we have to live with it.

Anonymous
Anonymous

The city is maxed out in it’s automobile capacity. now what?

Anonymous
Anonymous

“The city is maxed out in it’s automobile capacity.”

It is?.. and you came to that conclusion how?

Anonymous
Anonymous

If you read your history, this city was built for Flagler’s railroad. It already had canoes and ships. Miami had international airline flights before automobiles were ubiquitous.
So, it wasn’t “built for the automobile” as your Prius driving professor taught you. And your professor was also wrong when he tried to indoctrinate you to believe that there is a moral superiority in bashing cars, or people who can afford nice ones an the independence they represent.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Look, isn’t there enough farmland in MiamiDade county? This is supposed to be city living. Be a city and stop trying to invent silly gimmicks to merge some kind of farming/highrise building concept.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Ugh… Stuff one reads online…

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is silliest comment I read today. ‘Be a city’? Really? Grow up.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Really? Well everybody living in Miami should be cool with anybody having a small farm with roosters, chickens, goats, and cows roaming around in their yards then.

You third world people with your third world mentality TMTFO!

Anonymous
Anonymous

I agree, you rural cats need to keep your tractors and cow manure where they belong!, using the metro rail without parking!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yeah.. these idiots want to get mad at me but I’m not the trying to “include urban farming plots” in what’s supposed to be a “city.” What a waste of land that could be used for new apartments where the average person in this town can rent something that’s at least $1100 a month for a one bedroom instead of a ridiculous $1650 and above.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well, before you make such smart comments, you should read the article that way you will notice that no animals were mentioned, that this is an already existing produce hub, and also that the existing buildings will be restored.
While you are practicing your reading also research “architect BIG”.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Hey Einstein, the article states: The redeveloped Produce Center will include urban farming plots (either between buildings or on “roofscapes,”). What do you think they fertilize crops with?.. “cow poop” dummy!

Anonymous
Anonymous

This person is on the wrong blog…no Kardashian news here!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Uh, what?