New Details Revealed About Riverside Wharf Entertainment District Planned In Miami

The developer planning the $185M Riverside Wharf entertainment district in Downtown Miami has revealed new details of the project ahead of groundbreaking.

Construction is planned to begin in 2022, developer Alex Mantecon told Travel Weekly.

The project will have “best-in-class entertainment and dining,” Mantecon said. “we don’t mean best-in-class as in the most expensive and flashy the way Miami is. We mean best-in-class simply as just the best.”

There will be two separate 10 story buildings, but they will appear to be one building. The reason for the split is to minimize noise at the hotel.

What is currently Wharf Miami will occupy the ground floor of both buildings, along with a Garcia’s fish market.

The hotel building will have 165 keys, with a hotel lobby and amenities on the second floor and a rooftop pool. The developers chose Dream as the hotel brand since it is a creative, independent, boutique lifestyle brand.

The south building will be an entertainment building, with double-height 28-foot ceilings. There will be restaurants on the second floor, with a ballroom above that and a nightclub above. The rooftop will have a day club.

The goal is to make the area walkable with a lot of entertainment and dining options, Mantecon said.

CUBE 3 Architects is designing the development, with landscape design by Savino-Miller Design Studio.

Mantecon and Driftwood Capital are the developers.

Completion is scheduled for 2025.

 

 


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Anonymous
3 months ago

The wharf changed the game…this is a while new game. Can’t wait to watch it rise!!

Anonymous
3 months ago

*whole

Anonymous
3 months ago

*hole

Not Anonymous
3 months ago

I like it, great design

Anonymous
3 months ago

I want this built yesterday.

Anonymous
3 months ago

In my humble opinion, one of the best designs to hit Miami in a long time.
Enough of the quasi-pseudo Mediterranean look.
Whatever happened to Mid Modern, Art Nouveau, Art Deco, MIMO and Key West styles that at one point were prevalent in the area? Heck, I’d take Brutalist over another quasi-pseudo Mediterranean look. Leave that for Coral Gables where they are doing it right.

Anonymous
3 months ago

Boy aren’t you stuck in the past.

DJL Cyber
3 months ago

To be fair, Brutalist architecture would be an amazing feature if it were to exist in Downtown Miami.

Melo is sigma and chad
3 months ago

Already does, from MDC wolfson, Hyatt convention center to the government center.

Anonymous
3 months ago

It all aged horribly, too.

MM305
3 months ago

No one does brutalist anymore because of the Communist implication and the de-humanization of the space it occupies. Very cool design. That area of the river is heating up. Will Miami upzone the other side of the river finally and allow east little havana to grow up into the Riverside neighborhood it was always meant to be?

Anonymous
3 months ago

Where were you the past fifteen years? Almost everything has been “quasi-pseudo” ugly interpretations of mid-century modernism courtesy of some brainlet at Arquitectonica who learned everything about it from watching Mad Men. Can we get Neo-Mediterranean Revival done right like Coral Gables, as well as other new classical architectural styles for… you know, diversity?

Anonymous
3 months ago

Love this!

Melo is sigma and chad
3 months ago

Start piling work already

Anonymous
3 months ago

Sidewalks on the banks of the Miami River must be fully unlocked, starting with those under the first drawbridge on Brickell Avenue.

Anonymous
3 months ago

That’d be far too sensible

MM305
3 months ago

From your mouth to gods ears, they need to connect Jose Marti with the Brickell Circle to start the thing! Then the river will be ready to truly take off to another level.

Anonymous
3 months ago

“we don’t mean best-in-class as in the most expensive and flashy the way Miami is….”

LOL!

Anonymous
3 months ago

The project I’m most excited about in Miami!

Anonymous
3 months ago

This is awesome.

Too bad the cobblestone street in the rendering takes 15 years of permitting to get approved by Miami Public Works.

Anonymous
3 months ago

Although this has some 1950’s design elements, I think it’s still a nice project.

Anonymous
3 months ago

bananas

Anonymous
3 months ago

Que Pinga! Que Pinga!

Mary
3 months ago

Que necesidad de usar esas palabras😂

Anonymous
3 months ago

Ay verdad aunque sean ricas

Anonymous
3 months ago

Stunning looking project, but can they demolish the ugly overpasses.

Anonymous
3 months ago

You mean I95 and the 836… Probably one of the busiest interchanges in Florida 🤣🤣🤣

Ciparoo
3 months ago

It’s a gordian knot that will take a lot to unravel. don’t expect it to happen any time soon.

Anonymous
3 months ago

Not only is it the busiest interchange with over 200,000 vehicles daily, its the terminus that connects trucking and rail lines to the port of Miami… and dumb ass leftists and faux environmentalists say, “just tear it down, no big deal”.

Anonymous
3 months ago

This hipster hangout will be gone from here long before the overpasses. Who knows, maybe one day you will need to use these overpasses to drive to that ugly four letter word–WORK.

Anonymous
3 months ago

Lmao I think you need to check the definition of hipster and then pay another visit to the Wharf.

Anonymous
3 months ago

Lmao I think you need to not resign from a job, and stop living off your mom and dad because COVID is soo scarewee.

Anonymous
3 months ago

I paid a visit. What a flock of douchebags there. Wharf Barf.

Anonymous
3 months ago

If the overpasses are demolished, this land is ripe for redevelopment again, because as proposed, this development turns itself away, for good reason, from the overpasses with an ugly brown wall with long holes poked in it like Swiss cheese.

Anonymous
3 months ago

That brown wall needs to go

Anonymous
3 months ago

The over passes aren’t getting demolished, wake up! Its the most used corridor in Miami Dade County. The port is connected to it, downtown, Brickell, and Jackson Hospital as well as the Miami River. Think about how many people need that. It ain’t going anywhere ever, its too valuable at moving good and people.

Anonymous
3 months ago

I wish they would