New Zoning For Wynwood As Neighborhood Evolves From Industrial Roots

Wynwood has seen a lot of change in recent years, and now the city could be modifying the neighborhood’s zoning rules better suit property owners.

Later this week, Miami’s Planning, Zoning and Appeals Board is scheduled to vote on a plan that would radically alter permitted uses for property in the area. City officials say that if approved, the new rules would allow Wynwood to transition from an industrial zone into ‘a diverse, mixed-use, residential neighborhood.’ Over 18 months of work has gone into studying the proposal, city officials say.

In total, about 205 acres could see zoning changes. Of that area, about 104 acres will change from Industrial zoning to General Commercial zoning (which also permits residential use.) Other properties which are already zoned Commercial would be permitted more intense residential use and more varied commercial uses. Just a small portion of land will retain the Industrial zoning designation.

A companion piece would create the city’s first Neighborhood Revitalization District in Wynwood, with regulations designed to preserve the unique characteristics of the area. The area would have it’s own signage, landscape and parking rules. Large scale projects would need to be reviewed by a new review board, and a new TDR program would be created.

The first vote on the changes is scheduled for tomorrow.

 

Existing zoning, and proposed changes:

 

 

 

29 Comments
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Anonymous
5 years ago

Classic Miami politician thinking- increase supply of commercial and residential units to widen their wallets, but completely forget that the influx of residents/shoppers will worsen traffic.

How about we think of a mass-transit plan for this area before we build it up. It’ll be much easier thinking about this ahead of plan, as Boston and NYC can attest to.

Frank
5 years ago

So true! There isn’t enough foresight. Part of what makes Wynwood great right now is that there is nearly unlimited parking and deserted streets filled with warehouses. If residential developments crop up there will be more people living there all the time and more cars parked there all the time too! Worst yet, people see Miami and say that we make nothing… but Wynwood used to be a place where industry and commerce were made. Now they make art there, and paint walls, and drink wine. There has to be an industrial heart to a city to make it balanced.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Mixed feelings. Part of the neighborhood’s character is defined by it’s scale. This will surely lead to buildings higher in height although hopefully not all are maxed out at the permitted 5 floors.

Anonymous
5 years ago

And that has always been the problem with Wynwood and why it’s taking so long to evolve because people like you who just want to dink around all the time with no taller than five floor projects.

Why are people like you so afraid of ten or twenty floor structures in Wynwood?

Anonymous
5 years ago

Did you miss the part where he said “Part of the neighborhood’s character is defined by it’s scale.”?

Wynwood is defined by its unique and converted spaces. Start turning this into another canyon of high rises and there is really nothing unique about it in this city, except it being further away from the water than the others.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Taking so long? Wynwood was nothing like it is today only a few years ago years ago. I feel it is transforming at a remarkable pace. Not every neighborhood needs to have high rises sticking out of it. Cohesion can be very important in making a neighborhood attractive and successful. Art Deco district in Sobe and Mimo district up Biscaye Blvd are good examples (the few taller buildings mixed in with the Art Deco hotels stick out like sore thumbs). Alternatively, would it really look good or work well with the community to have 20 story buildings littered amongst lowrise buildings and homes in places like Miami Shores or Morningside? There are plenty of other places to build tall buildings around town, especially in central/established business centers / near transit stations.

Anonymous
5 years ago

People like you are funny to me because you speak as if you KNOW IT ALL. Yes, Wynwood is still taking a long time to evolve competely into what it can be. If it isn’t, then why are they going through the motion of changing zoning codes for “205 acres?” That’s not something “I” made up! You want transformation? Then transformation must be ubiquitous, containing a variety that will appeal to more than just the people who think like YOU. There is no reason why something ten stories tall can’t be cohesive with and around other structures that are shorter. Anyone who thinks it can’t be is very limited in ideas and vision, and can’t see outside the box. People like you think 1950’s style Miami, always thinking doing something only this or that way will succeed. Meanwhile a meeting of the minds have been forming in Miami to see what can be done to stop the brain drain that’s been occuring with college graduates and lowrise buildings in Miami Shores and Moringside sure isn’t enticing them to stay, nor is Wynwood the way it is now.

Wynwood is ripe for a transformation like Brickell, and clamoring for it to look and be designed in one particular way is limiting, and contrary to what YOU think, not everyone desires that.

Oscar
5 years ago

Nervous with good reason about this. On the one hand, I can totally see the need for additional investment and therefore zoning flexibility in the area. On the other, I’m not very confident in any local “review board” actually doing their jobs in preserving the characteristics that have made the area desirable to begin with. We shall see.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Good bye Wynwood as we know it. Now big developers will take over and create a new Brickell or Midtown. What a shame and disappointment.

Anonymous
5 years ago

You don’t know that.

Anonymous
5 years ago

“Wynwood as we know it” already has changed significantly. Plenty artists and gallery owners were priced out, leaving only people with deeper pockets and plenty restaurants, cafes, etc. However, the only people going are those working or visiting. At least this will ultimately allow for people to actually live in the area. This is kind of the evolution of neighborhoods like this and is completely expected.

Anonymous
5 years ago

“Now big developers will take over and create a new Brickell or Midtown.”

Good!

Anonymous
5 years ago

If you read the proposed Zoning change, you’ll notice that a new version of T5 is being proposed specific to Wynwood. If they wanted Brickel they would have just re-zoned to T6, not an amended T5.

Really???
5 years ago

Every neighborhood grows and matures and whether the eventual outcome is better or worse varies a lot as with most things people have an opinion on. Fighting against the growth is a no win situation. Money is always going to win out. The key is to put measures in place so that the growth doesn’t consume the area.

I think they’ve done that with this proposal. Wynwood, whether you like it or not is essential a downtown district and will be dense. Can you fight it for a while, sure but whats the point in that. Instead they created a transfer of development rights program where some owners can buy the density they want from other owners making it more profitable to keep an existing warehouse.

There are also some revisions that will help make it more finically feasible to development smaller units which leads to affordability. As well as some cool parking ideals that would allow a way for developers to builder smaller buildings.

But as usual most people want to read a snippet and make a ill informed opinion.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Very little thought for cyclist. Wynwood is the perfect place to get around on a bike and most of the effort seems to go to building height and redistribution of travel and parking lanes. Only one bike lane shown on the incorrect side of a parked car and possible on the Woonerf. Honestly if you are starting something from zero why not do it correctly- every street section should have had bike lanes.

Really???
5 years ago

They aren’t recreating anything. They are taking the standard Miami 21 code and standard City of Miami public works sections. They tried to do some more creative stuff and the city told them to just make it conform to what we have now.

The public realm will be handled by the city and has nothing to do with private developers. They could of made the entire street a bike lane and it wouldn’t of matter because they aren’t responsible for building it.

marc
5 years ago

I’m curious to see how long it will take to get a luxury this or luxury that because you know, this would be the natural evolution of this neighborhood.

Anonymous
5 years ago

i think the board if possible should make wynwood a place for the middle class. The only delevopment allowed in the area should be affordable housing.Wynwood being that its further inland making it less desirable for the rich folks should be a place for those who arent millionaires but hard working people who want to live closer to downtown. For any developer that would ever read this there is plenty money to be made building something affordable for people like me.

Really???
5 years ago

The only way affordable housing works is that the subsidies from the government (tax credits or bond financing) make it profitable to build and rent lower priced product. Without the subsidies the amount you can pay wouldn’t justify the amount spent to develop.

Not to mention there are currently A LOT of affordable housing going on in place like west Brickell and even new high rises in Overtown which is only 10 blocks away. Typical Miami entitled attitude. Miami has one of the hottest neighborhoods around and the government should come in and spend money to subsidize them to live there because the neighborhood that they are already subsidizing is beneath them.

If you want to live in a hip cool area then stop complaining on the internet and figure out how to get a better job.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Flawless victory

Yet Another Anonymous
5 years ago

Ah the Herman Cain solution. If you don’t want to be poor, just BE rich.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Nice deduction, Sherlock. Or he’s basically just saying to not expect entitlement to everything people work their ass off (and pay out of their asses) to get. Plenty of decent options for lower income individuals, but as usual, they’re not happy with what they have and feel the right for more. People used to work and aspire for more, not ask and expect for it to be handed to them.

Really???
5 years ago

Not saying that al all. This isn’t about being poor or rich. Melo is renting BRAND NEW units in a trendy neighborhood for $1400. So were talking about someone making $50k, which is hardly rich. Most affordable housing would help people in the $38k to $48k range depending on the size of their household. The higher end stuff coming to Wynwood is starting at the $1700 rate which would equate to a salary in the upper $60k’s.

So were talking about the difference between $38k and $68k. There are options nearby (again some even in Brickell) for those making $38k. But you essentially have people here who make $38k, have perfectly good options to rent in well located places but I guess feel they deserve to live in the newest and coolest places because well they live in Miami and focus on superficial things.

It would be the equivalent of someone being able to afford a Honda Civic which is a very reliable and nice car demanding that the government should subsidize them driving a Benz.

Really???
5 years ago

I just want to add that I am an affordable housing advocate and have worked for an affordable housing developer. We need more funding for these programs. But to say we shouldn’t be building market rate housing and restricting entire up and coming neighborhoods seems a bit ridiculous.

It also seems odd to refer to people paying $2000 as somehow rich and not “hardworking”. This conversation has nothing to do with rich people.

If you look at Miami DDA reports you’ll see that there is a growing number of young professionals moving to downtown neighborhoods. The median household income is $65K. These are people working a 9 to 5 job. Why you wouldn’t consider them middle class and hardworking in beyond me.

I could see if you were talking about some CEO making millions and paying 15% capital gains taxes but people like that don’t rent for $2000 in Wynwood.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Most of these properties are already owned by wealthy developers. I think this up-zoning would be better in other neighborhoods that need actual revitalization, not faux art galleries and hipster spaces that already have tony goldman and moishe mana backing them.

Really???
5 years ago

Again, part of the issue was density. If developers can’t build a larger amounts of smaller units with less parking (which would lead to more affordable units) then they would simply build a smaller amount of larger luxury units.

You guys would seem to rather cut off your nose to spite your face. You do realize there is a developer making money when affordable housing is built.

Ao
5 years ago

Remove parking minimums for small lot developments. The decrepit-warehouse/giant new megatower contrast is because small owners aren’t able to develop small projects because they need to add 15 parking spaces and small lots can’t support that type of development.

Really???
5 years ago

They lowered parking minimums for smaller units to 1 from 1.5. Then they allow developers to pay into the Wynwood Trust fund that will provide parking for the entire area.

So if you are a small owner and can’t find a way to provide the reduced parking for your small lot you can simply pay into the fund and not have parking at all. The fund then provides strategic garages throughout the area so a bunch of small owners don’t burden the entire area.

Anonymous
5 years ago

I believe they are allowing 8 story buildings with roof top gardens.At this point ultra wealthy international investors have created a bubble that will effectively drive out small business and artists. For me, child of clothing manufacturer, who lived through lean years, prior to the creation of Wynwood , am personally ecstatic my dad also built warehouses. That said, hope the ultra wealthy don’t ruin the neighborhood