North Miami’s $4 Billion SoLeMia Will Have Two Swimmable 10-Acre Lagoons Surrounded By Mall, Apartments

You’ll soon be able to swim in one of two 10-acre lagoons on a former Superfund site in North Miami.

The project, to be called SoLeMia (apparently a play on Soffer/LeFrak/Miami), is being developed by the LeFrak and Soffer families. It was formerly known as Biscayne Landing.

The two partners started $150 million worth of infrastructure work last month, including roads, sewers, and the swimmable lagoons. They are financing the work themselves, according to the WSJ.

Groundbreaking on two rental towers and 500,000 square feet of retail space is scheduled in about 15 months, following the completion of infrastructure work. Eventually, the $4 billion project will include 4,390 residential units and more than 1 million square feet of commercial space.

Arquitectonica is the project architect.

 

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Anonymous
5 years ago

When will people on this site finally understand that these developers are a little bit smarter than we are about what they are doing? As in they went to school for this and they hire people that know what they are doing. who in their right mind would build a 4 BILLION dollar project and not take proper care in prepping the area for development? Didnt you just read they spent $150 million on that alone so you damn right you will be able to eat the dirty off the property! Stop thinking small think big! If everybody listened to you guys nothing would be built. Everything is possible just do it and dont worry about the negative people who say you cant do it because they cant see it which they dont matter their not they ones trying to do it.

pat
5 years ago

A typical ass hole that has short term look rather than lloking at the long term effects of this plan. You have dollars on your eyes rather than concern for life or effects of over building.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Utterly absurd. Developers are as prone to failure and building boondoggles as anyone. What is with the all hail the developer nonsense?

Anonymous
5 years ago

All im saying is dont you guys think they no more about this than we do? Dont you think they have experts hired to do extensive research on the site? Dont you think they are there everyday for the past few years and came to the conclusion that its safe to build there? Or do you really think all these investors are going to throw 4 billion damn dollars away?

Oscar
5 years ago

Anonymous #7 is right, you guys. I don’t know why everybody is hatin. I for one can’t wait to swim in those lagoons and see what super powers I develop.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Enjoy as it’s probably the closes to downtown you can afford.

Oscar
5 years ago

“You’ll soon be able to swim in one of two 10-acre lagoons on a former Superfund site…” I never knew I wanted to do that until this very moment.

John
5 years ago

Reminds me of The Toxic Avenger movie series.

Marc305
5 years ago

I don’t want to be yet another voice concerned about the location of this project, but back when I started in Real Estate in 2001 (and all the way up to 2009) my office was located in North Miami and we would show many properties around this location. The biggest complain was the nasty smell, it killed more deals for us than anything else. I drove by there last year and the smell was gone, but I do wonder how much cleaning they actually have done in this area. Still, I am not a hater so I wish them the best!

Anonymous
5 years ago

It’s amazing what a little Clorox can do.

Anonymous
5 years ago

We go there all the time and smell is still there it stars somewhere around 163rd and allthe way 151th st

Anonymous
5 years ago

The ever-present smell in the area you described comes from the Northern District Sewage Treatment Plant. It is just north of the entrance road to FIU. There are three sewage treatment plants in Miami-Dade and this one is the northernmost one. The foul smell has mostly to do with the sewage treatment plant and little to do with the remediated former landfill.

Anonymous
5 years ago

So smell will persist!?

Anonymous
5 years ago

Yes, there is almost no way to get rid of it completely. When something decomposes, it emits vapors and unless you can capture 100 % of them, the reminders of the chemical changes will be all around. The other plant is in Virginia Key, just south of Fisher Island. And the last one is in South Miami-Dade. BTW, there is a big sewage pumping station on Biscayne Blvd. at the southern end of Museum Park. I’d hate to think what would happen if there would be a spill there. >>> Let’s just say the tourists and Biscayne Wall residents would get a whiff of Miami’s backside. LOL.

brian
5 years ago

What they should of done is just turn it into a rental cash cow add a few pools and a better gym and call it a day. they can rent it to college kids from FIU, UM, and the Local rich kids from Aventura. who the hell would put 4 billion into that area its a swamp that surrounds it.

Really???
5 years ago

This was a huge missed opportunity. They had a lot of land to work with. They could have took all the space they have in this plan and created a walkable town center that would have been great for the area. That would have created a lot more value for the units. Fail.

John
5 years ago

Its possible prepping the entire area of marsh would be too expensive. Maybe they decided to drain the majority of the water into those ponds. Imagine the fill requirement.

Alex
5 years ago

AWESOME! I would love to go swimming in toxic water!

WhyNotNow
5 years ago

The 2 lagoons concept is actually laughable! This spot has been used as a dumping ground since the 80s, most recently as the recipient of Toxic soil from Brickell City Centre (google it, n. Miami politicians (via lobbying relatives) took $$$ from swire to dump bad dirt).
However, the smell everyone is mentioning is none of this, but the natural decomposition that affects mangrove swamps tha occur several times yearly. Even Deeing Bay gets this stench.

Anonymous
5 years ago

It is the sewage plant that’s fouling up the air! Read above!

Anonymous
5 years ago

This is right behind Costco, The Post Office and Target….

Anonymous
5 years ago

The breeze here is stronger and the noises of birds and tree’s swaying is calming. I wonder why they would build square instead of areodynamic. also, the longers parts of the rectangle are facing the east and west…um thats worst thinn you can do for the energy bills. Geeze, who builds like this anymore? This design is so 20 years ago.
I wonder if they have biologist on board to help design the sustainabilty of the lagoons and wildlife that will show up.

Anonymous
4 years ago

The lagoons are chlorinated. They are essentially huge pools, not actual natural lagoons

Anonymous
5 years ago

Where is this? North Miami’s kind of a broad brushstroke.

Dave
5 years ago

The old Biscayne Landing land/toxic waste dump.

MiamiArchi
5 years ago

just west of the FIU Biscayne Campus

Anonymous
5 years ago

Very near to FIU Biscayne Campus!!!

Martim
5 years ago

What’s the protocol on releasing a Superfund site to be developed as Resi? I can only imagine the unlimited liability of a developer who builds on such a site and ends up harboring a zillion cases of cancer over time. What are the chances those lagoons are just an inch away from becoming a hotbed of radioactive sludge? Interested, because I have always wanted to considered, seriously (more than just the costume,) as a candidate for a spot in X-Men.

Anonymous
5 years ago

There is already resi on the site that they can’t give away. Saying I’d be ‘hesitant’ to hop in the water on a superfund site is quite an understatement.

Martim
5 years ago

To the guy who’s comment was deleted…where is your sense of humor? And yeah, I agree with you. Don’t care if the SuperFund site has been allowed to be developed; I would never purchase a home within that area.

Anonymous
4 years ago

It was a former landfill, not some DDT factory. The chemicals are known and at low levels and decrease every day due to engineering controls in place. The landfill is isolated and capped. You would literally have to dig through the liner of the lagoon (read chlorinated pool), and through the cap with an excavator, then proceed to eat, daily, pounds of solid waste to see the negative health effects. It sounds like a great deal to savvy buyers if there is a discount due to the site’s history, but I don’t think you will see that decreased property value.

Anonymous
5 years ago

It’s great that they have these grandious plans but we already have way too many vehicles on the road in this area. This is a hurricane evacuation zone

Anonymous
5 years ago

The whole city is.

Anonymous
5 years ago

Just go back to the old name and own the history. Interama!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interama_%28exhibition%29

DR.VEGAS
5 years ago

I no longer live in Miami…and I can STILL remember the smell of driving in and around that place.
Another project for out-of-towners / foreigners?
Can’t imagine locals would buy.

Abdul
5 years ago

Suburb of Little Haiti