Photos: Aerial Approach Into MIA, Nine Days After Irma

This is what Miami looked like from the air, nine days after being hit by Hurricane Irma:

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Anonymous
3 years ago

… Looks the same.

Anonymous
3 years ago

It might be the point of the post, in contrast to Wilma when you could see blue tarp everywhere.

Anonymous
3 years ago

All I see is empty lots for potential developments.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Build the Coastal Link and it’ll happen.

Anonymous
3 years ago

so when are we going to talk about how the national media discourse is how vulnerable Miami is to sea level rise, and yet really not much damage occurred, at least not much more than what would have already happened anyway? I just feel that while, yes Global Warming is a serious topic and one that needs to be studied and addressed. I also feel that certain parts of our leadership, Levin Mayor of Miami Beach for example, have used Miami and the “threat” of sea level rise as a way to curry favor with the national media, basically putting a good portion of our economic development and real estate value at risk, simply for a problem that #1 all coastal cities will face, not just Miami and #2 Miami seems to be fairly resistant already, just look at the difference in damage from this recent storm and compare it to the Houston hurricane and “super storm sandy” which New York area had a hard time dealing with. I just hate the way they always put Miami at ground zero for sea level rise which hurts our real estate values and long term economic security and never mention the fact we are surviving pretty well compared to other cities.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Ok I’m sure we’ll fare really well when we get a direct hit, this things core was actually a hundred miles away–doesn’t take a rocket scientist to realize the destruction that wouldve unfolded with a direct hit.

Anonymous
3 years ago

but don’t you think the same can be said of any other major city? Again I am not saying we should ignore the issue, I just don’t appreciate being the guinea pig/poster child for what is in fact a “global” issue.

Jesus
3 years ago

I honestly agree with the statement but Miami is forecasted to be the first of the cities to be underwater in a few decades. Maybe that’s why we get the press coverage of the issue like we do.

Anonymous
3 years ago

If you belief that, go move to Ocala. Why contribute to society here if everything here gets destroyed?

Or, is your name literal and is doesn’t concern you because you can walk on water?

Anonymous
3 years ago

If you love it or leave it morons had your way, the US would still be a British colony…

Anonymous
3 years ago

What does that have to do with anything? Maybe we’d be part of Canada, but that’s a stretch. Besides, the American Revolution was over taxes.

Anonymous
3 years ago

A direct hit doesn’t necessarily mean more rain and flooding. It’s wind speed.

Anonymous
3 years ago

The fact inland cities like Houston flood in a hurricane shows it’s an infrastructure problem, not a sea level rise problem the MSM likes to sensationalize as if it’s the end of the world. I mean, they made it sound like Tokyo would be a radioactive wasteland over Fukushima’s contained meltdown miles and miles away.

Yes sea level rise is an issue, but it has to do more with the fact Florida was underwater before settled, and had to be drained and channelized, which sometimes made more problems than solved. Mother nature is simply taking it back from aging infrastructure. Irma considered, hopefully it’s a call to fix, upgrade and/or rebuild.

Anonymous
3 years ago

The Miami river frontage needs to be developed faster. That’s my takeaway.