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Proposed DD41 Inspired By Aeolian Geomorphology

Proposed DD41 Inspired By Aeolian Geomorphology

Leasing is underway in the Design District for a retail building designed by Royal Byckovas.

The architect says that the form of the structure will appear to have been the result of “years of aeolian geomorphology.”

The Verge Building is a planned 3 story, 8,400 sf retail structure located in Miami’s burgeoning Design District. The project is positioned at a significant intersection, a gateway to the Design District and by virtue of its location instills a sense of excitement through the notion of arrival and departure. The architecture captures the independence of the District by distinguishing itself via its separation from the collective of connected facade centric volumes that define the neighborhood’s tapestry. The Verge Building is “unhinged” and appears to expand the contract, switching the surrounding spatial context between the vacuous and compressive.

Seeking an advantage over the diminutive lot characteristics, the building rises up and sits, perched at the fringes of North Miami avenue. The form and curvature of the facade define the swelling boundaries of the District and invites visitors to pause and then explore the full exterior limits of the site and building. Upon examination, the building’s form appears to be the results of years of aeolian geomorphology that when observed from series of vantage points appear impenetrable. Yet,a slight shift of view reveals a building that is curiously boundless.

The materials that comprise the fabric of the building deviates conclusively between solid and transparency. There is a billowed softness of this meeting of material; between eh heave of the GFRC hexagon panels and the custom glass panels. Thus pulsing switch of transparencies fracture the daylight and sends shards of piercing light through the generous volumes. The result is an orchestrated binary of light and shadow that continually shift within the interior floor-scales.

A press release from the broker:

TSG GROUP SELECTS CBRE TO EXCLUSIVELY LEASE

NEW DESIGN DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT – DD41

Leading commercial real estate brokerage tapped to

infuse planned project with a diverse mix of high-street retail tenants

MIAMI (July 13, 2017) – TSG Group – a boutique, diversified real estate development and investment company in South Florida – announced today that it has selected CBRE, a global integrated commercial real estate and investment services firm, as the exclusive leasing agent for its planned commercial development, DD41, in Miami’s Design District. Acquired by TSG Group in 2015, the site encompasses nearly 9,000 square feet of leasable retail space.

DD41 presents a preeminent retail option for leading brands that wish to join the neighborhood, which today, is the city’s most notable luxury fashion destination home to names such as Louis Vuitton, Christian Louboutin and Tiffany & Co. Situated at the bustling intersection of 17 NE 41st Street and North Miami Avenue, the property directly neighbors the area’s coveted designer boutiques and award-winning restaurants. It is also just steps from the recently-completed Institute of Contemporary Art and world-renowned De la Cruz Collection.

CBRE Senior Vice President Paco Diaz will oversee leasing for DD41.

Encompassing three stories, the project is designed by Royal Byckovas, the global architecture firm behind Bal Harbour Tower and Argentina’s St. Regis Hotel and Residences. Their collaborative team of experts envisioned DD41 to exemplify the artistic, contemporary style that is synonymous with the Design District.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with CBRE on our latest venture,” said Camilo Lopez, CEO and managing partner of TSG Group. “The Design District has become the nation’s cosmopolitan playground. With CBRE’s extensive market knowledge, we are confident that DD41 will seamlessly blend into the fabric of the community and be a strong draw for high-street retailers seeking their place in this burgeoning district.”

Set to be a flagship of the Design District, DD41 is in proximity to The Museum Garage, a curated 900-car parking structure that will feature six facades, each designed by a different architecture firm using elements such as, recycled cars, puzzle pieces, and murals. In addition, Phase III of the neighborhood’s expansion will include ABC Kitchen – a farm-to-table concept by Michelin-starred chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten – and L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon, both with plans to open later this year.

 

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Gables
Gables

Gorgeous

Add
Add

I live down the street, the ppl that are being negative about pedestrian traffic have it all wrong, they are building the area up, more restUrants with big names will be opening, apts,studio,condos Are being built or proposed, along with a hotel, they know exactly what they are doing, give it time

Anonymous
Anonymous

Down the street to the east or the west? I live one block west and very few homes are being renovated or improved. Hoping this building right on the corner might spur some adjacent home improvements.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Really sharp…. !!…great addition and fits in perfectly..

marc
marc

A couple hotels are desperately needed in this area.

Robespierre
Robespierre

Totally agree.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Desperate for whom?

Anonymous
Anonymous

For the neighborhood to have life.

Anonymous
Anonymous

MD is still under construction.. can’t wait for final product.

Anonymous
Anonymous

What’s MD????

Anonymous
Anonymous

MDD – Miami Design District

Anonymous
Anonymous

Nice.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“We’ve alway been believers in the Design District, and even to this day a lot of people don’t think it’s going to work,” Sherman said. “But we see through the noise, and when the next phase opens it will be an incredible, vibrant destination within Miami.”

Anonymous
Anonymous

Glad to see more creative, unique architecture in Miami.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Dope! Fingers crossed that this goes through.

Random question is there any other building around town with the hexagonal windows? I’d be interested to see what NOA they used for that or if there is an alternative process to get those permitted.

Oscar
Oscar

Love the Design District but can’t afford to do too much there. Like others on here, I’ve also noted the lack of traffic and I wonder if the area wouldn’t benefit from a bit more dining and more affordable shopping options. You obviously don’t want to compromise the high-end, design angle they’ve worked so hard to build but I think they might be able to stretch it a bit more than they have. At the end of the day, the best deal the developer made was partnering with LVMH. Don’t know the terms but you’d think he has basically guaranteed occupancy with more than a dozen of their luxury brands. Brilliant.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Guess you haven’t been there lately. Gloria and Emilio Estefan’s newly opened “Estefan Kitchen” http://www.estefankitchen.com/ has a happy hour that is affordable and fun with live music.

aceraroja
aceraroja

That statement is several mouthfuls of design-school gibberish, but it looks cool. It won’t activate shit while Miami Avenue is still a treeless potholed expressway with a 2-foot sunblasted sidewalk.

For those talking about the District in general, I work there. It’s dead and sterile, for sure. And when it’s not, it’s one kind of person exclusively. That said, they are expanding the less-luxurious shopping and many storefronts are set aside for restaurants and cafes at reduced rental rates to induce that street life everyone is talking about. An art museum opened. A hotel is under construction. Of course, there is nothing organic or lively about the DD. It’s all of Miami’s richest and most horrible and basic people aping a European experience, and it’s painfully apparent. But then, that’s basically all of Miami so you can’t pin that on MDD. At least it puts its giant parking monstrosities on its periphery, unlike BCC.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I have to say there are really beautiful buildings built and being built in the Design District. But the area is DEAD every time I ride through. It’s like a museum for nice pretty buildings. I think they should focus on apartment to get foot traffic. The District is no longer “New”, there should be more activity by now.

Anonymous
Anonymous

More than happy for them to take a measured, long-term approach than all the quick crap we normally get just to slap something together before the cycle ends. Plenty of other WOKE areas if you want that, so go there. I think the value proposition’s proof’s in the pudding with the high-end brands that bought in, but I’m sure you know better.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I agree. for me the design district has never been about hustle and bustle. Theres plenty of other neighborhoods for that, that probably are better suited to it, I kind of like the variety. It’s a different clientele that quite honestly probably does most of the shopping while regular folks are at work. How many people really are going to go to Casa Fendi for example and buy stuff for their house over the weekend? It’s a mall but kind of not a mall more like a hybrid “Mall-seum”.

Anonymous
Anonymous

“Mall-seum”. Love the hybrid word. Muy worthy.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I agree with the other anonymous, the Design District is too close to Biscayne Bay, or, should I say, the Waterfront, to be so desolate at night. Miami should make a goal to structure the Design District, Wynnwood, Upper Eastside, Downtown, Brickell, and the Grove for the citizens of Miami because the tourist have Miami Beach.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I totally agree, the area is dead and boring. Shame, shame, shame.
When will developers realize you don’t build an area with one theme in mind? It’s like an outdoor mall in the scorching heat of Miami.
An area cannot just be one thing. A thriving area cannot just be high-end stores. You need cafes, restaurants, pubs, hotels, apartments, look at the thriving design districts in Tokyo, Paris and London.

Anonymous
Anonymous

It’s far from boring if you appreciate the aesthetic. Where else can you see a Bucky Fuller glass dome acting as an atrium for an underground garage? Life is more than happy hours and noise.

Anonymous
Anonymous

If want to draw more people to these stores that sell that stuff you’re talking about, you should desire people see those stores day and night if you own one selling goods there.

Edin
Edin

In Europe and the rest of the world, people WALKING and taking PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION everywhere,in Miami and rest of the USA (except NY),people driving their cars everywhere (to the malls,movie theaters,sport events,shopping,dinners…).
That’s difference between us and them.As long as we don’t build mass transit, our parks,our streets,our plazas…will be DEAD.So,since,there is no any intention to build mass transit in Miami,everything will be DEAD and empty,but who cares,we have our cars to ride around.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Totally right!

Ilovearchytectures
Ilovearchytectures

Looks like a gigantic melanoma
(;-)

Anonymous
Anonymous

“Aeolian Geomorphology” is a mouthful. How about the WTF Building– but in a good way.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Not sure if you work in marketing or a market

Anonymous
Anonymous

BIG LOL……

Anonymous
Anonymous

Build it fast. It will make a great facade for a movie set in the future.