Rapid Transit Zoning: Related Proposes Gallery at Marti Park With 167 Mixed-Income Units

Related Urban Development Group has submitted plans for Gallery at Marti Park, a project that takes advantage of Miami-Dade’s new Rapid Transit Zoning area.

According to plans filed with Miami-Dade planners yesterday, Gallery at Marti Park is planned to include:

  • 157 mixed-income dwelling units
  • 5,200 square feet community center
  • 172 off-street parking spaces in a three-story podium

There will also be a clubroom, gym, and outdoor pool on the fourth floor.

Miami-Dade commissioners voted earlier this year to add the property to the Metromover Subzone of the Rapid Transit Zone, allowing for more intense development that bypasses City of Miami zoning rules.

The project is being designed by CMA Architects.

Here’s a description of the project by the developer:

Gallery at Marti Park (the “Development”) is a 167-unit mixed-income development in the Little Havana neighborhood development of Miami that will provide high quality housing for low- income households at 30% and 80% of AMI as well as market rate households. The project is being developed on two parcels adjacent to a 32-unit public housing site that is part of Joe Moretti Phase 2B. The two parcels currently consist of surface parking and a one-story community building called the Myers Senior Center, which will be replaced on the ground level of the proposed 12-story building. The proposed building will also contain 2 levels of parking and an elevated amenities deck.

A total of 85 units within the Development will be Tax Credit eligible and set aside for households earning between 30% and 80% of Area Median Income (“AMI”), of which 34 will be subsidized under the RAD Section 18 Blend Program. The remaining 82 units will be unrestricted units at market rate.

 

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Melo is sigma and Chad
2 months ago

We could use 200 more spread across Dade county

Anonymous
2 months ago

Amount too low.. I say 400 more…

Anonymous
2 months ago

This is exactly the type of development we need more of in Little Havana.

Melo is sigma and chad
2 months ago

and Lil Havana has plenty of empty lots

AnO
2 months ago

Miami-Dade County coming to
the rescue of people needing competitive rents. Mayor Levine-Cava and Eileen Higgins working while Crazy Joe Carollo argues.

Ana
1 month ago

Seems like Perez gets preferential treatment. The area is zoned t4. So he gets to build a 12 story building but all the other lots don’t get the same zoning.

T G
2 months ago

How is this considered metromover rapid transit zone? it’s like 10 blocks away from the nearest metromover station.

Melo is sigma and chad
2 months ago

Its 8 and and if you look at a maps of NYC & Tokyo they range from 5 to 12 blocks.

ANON
2 months ago

8 blocks with bad sidewalks, uneven shade, crossing under a highway, in the Miami heat. I still think we should build it, as the transit will never come without the demand, but we’re kidding ourselves if we think this is close to transit.

Anonymous
2 months ago

You run the risk of being robbed in NYC these days, and Tokyo has a lot of winding roads on hills, but muh bad sidewalks!

Lenny
2 months ago

There are a lot of busses on SW 7th & 8th Street.

Melo, a true giga Chad.
2 months ago

Based

IHateBrokerBabble
2 months ago

and, over the river and through the woods…

Anonymous
2 months ago

Metrorail

A Nonymous
2 months ago

Kind of a long walk to the Mover from there, but whatevs.

Melo is sigma and chad
2 months ago

8 blocks, nearly all cities people walk at least 7 to 10 blocks to a station

ThatGuy
2 months ago

People in Miami expect every building to have a train station across the street lol.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Is Metromover being extended to Lil Hav?

Anonymous
2 months ago

Only in the unrealistic dreams of some posters on here who want it extended to all ends of the county because they don’t want to pay fares on Metrorail, which undeniably is the feasible option, hence the unused east-west platform at Government Center Station.

Blah
2 months ago

NO.

A Nonymous
2 months ago

According to my maps app, it’s 0.7 miles and 16 minutes to walk to the nearest Mover station.
Downvote all you want, but that’s kinda a long walk in Miami heat.

Melo is sigma and Chad
2 months ago

muh the heat

Downtown Blue Voter
2 months ago

Planting more trees will help mitigate the heat.

Anonymous
2 months ago

I would live here.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Perfect!

anonymous
2 months ago

too many parking spots. cars are an economic drag. there should be less, and people should be encouraged to walk, bike and take transit. some may still choose to own a car. parking spots cost 40-50,00 to build!

Anonymous
2 months ago

Well you people who work at AUTO ZONE and the like heard this anonymous.. “cars are an economic drag.”

Anonymous
2 months ago

Subsidizing housing that comes with a gym and a pool…..

Southwest Til' I die!
2 months ago

This is amazing!

Westchester Kid
2 months ago

Love this but would definitely like to see more protected bike lanes stretch into the neighborhoods surrounding Downtown/Brickell. 16 minutes is a pretty short walk in all honesty but riding a bike would cut the time. Though I don’t think riding bikes in Little Havana in it’s current street configuration is the safest thing.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Stay in Westchester.

ANON
2 months ago

Riding a bike in the neighborhood streets in L. Hav. is fine, the problem is crossing the arterials like 7th, 8th, Flagler, etc. Those are death traps.

Go Marlins
2 months ago

Little Havana needs design regulations to maintain the integrity of the neighborhood to the likes of coral gables. Why shouldn’t there be design, paint color, and architectural requirements for the facades of these new buildings? little Havana is a huge destination point for tourists because people expect a “little Havana”. Washing that away with with modern white boxes on every block and along 8th street especially is really staining the neighborhood in a negative way in my opinion.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Would love architectural standards here but Little Havana is hardly a showcase of interesting architecture. If every corner looked like Versailles then I’d be more apt to agree but that’s definitely not the case.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Um, if you’ve been through Little Havana beyond Calle 8 and Flagler Street, you would see all the pre-war Mediterranean and Mission Revival-style, Dade County Pine Folk Victorian, Masonry Vernacular, Craftsman Bungalow, and Art Deco apartment and/or single-family houses. It’s a gem for how Miami used to be and what made it, and has great potential for walkability, historic preservation and restoration, and infill development if streetscape and infrastructure improvements are undertaken, and design guidelines with compatible architecture and human scale are adopted and actually enforced.

Anonymous
2 months ago

it’s good that you appreciate the architecture in little havana. some ignorant people believe that miami architecture is just cereal boxes.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Some of the wood frame houses have extensive termite damage. I grew up in one by the old Orange Bowl. Dade County pine would sink in water due to density, was more resistant to termites, but somehow the termites would eventually chew through many beams.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Little Havana is a bunch of shitty old houses whose owners have completely neglected them. Good riddance!

Anonymous
2 months ago

Love this neighborhood. Lots of hotties in the basketball courts and just hanging out

EJS
2 months ago

Yes. Yes. Yes. I live close by and welcome increased density which will bring more services.

Anonymous
2 months ago

It is a long walk when you have to do it in a city like miami that has non active street level.
We have a long way to go to make miami walkable.

Anonymous
2 months ago

^ He doesn’t know how to put one foot in front of the other yet.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Take note developers and architects from New York City or the Northeast.. this is how you design buildings in Miami, their designed with these kind of balconies!!!

Anonymous
2 months ago

Northeast towers don’t have balconies because you can’t use them year round so the cost isn’t worth it.

Anonymous
2 months ago

I said apartment buildings for Miami should be designed with these kind of balconies.

Anonymous
2 months ago

I agree on the basis the balconies are all lined up and symmetrical, unlike some market-rate housing and even “luxury” products (i.e., eyesores like Downtown 5th and Soleste Grand Central).

Anonymous
2 months ago

Solid infill at the right size and scale for the neighborhood. Until West Brickell, the Arts & Entertainment District are built out and Metrorail is extended west, rezoning for another vertical suburb like Edgewater and destroying more historic buildings in the process is a recipe for disaster.

Anonymous
2 months ago

That’s what I said to car makers in this country about discontinuing some models, its a “recipe for disaster.”

lol…

Anonymous but Famous
2 months ago

Those little grocery/ lunch counter dives in Little Havana and southern Overtown are underrated jewels, particularly those that have coffee windows opening out to the sidewalk. They promote pedestrians, the personnel is stable/ friendly and they make us unique unlike Edgewater, that is turning out t be just a bunch of look- at- me buildings from anywhere in the world. And, spirit- sapping chains like the 7- Elevens and Starbucks just won’t do.

From north 20 St to south 15 St and at least from west 27 Ave to east 2 Ave these should be mapped and a program designed to try and save them.

Anonymous
2 months ago

^Your spiritual health is determined by where you buy coffee? Shit, brew at home.

Anonymous
2 months ago

Those places are full of cockroaches and rodents. Good luck.