Restaurant Proposed At Fort Dallas Park

An unsolicited proposal has been submitted to operate a restaurant at Fort Dallas Park.

Sanctus Spiritus LLC wants to demolish the current structures on the site. A Bijan’s restaurant once operated there.

The company is proposing to build a 250-seat restaurant, with 10 percent of revenues going to the city.

A historical Palm Cottage is boarded up on the site and would be maintained by the restaurant operator under the proposal. The cottage was built in the 1890s, and moved to the Fort Dallas Park site in 1980 to make way for construction of the Centrust Tower.

The park is 22,207 square feet. It sits between a Metromover station and the River Park Hotel, in an area where a commissioner wants to build a larger Julia Tuttle Park.

 

the palm cottage:

(photos: phillip pessar)

 

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Anonymous
3 years ago

that would be cool

Anonymous
3 years ago

Cool looking house.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Would be excellent use of space, have walked past it for the last two years thinking how underutilized that area is.

Cobra
3 years ago

That building does not have the original materials it is probably not the original design. Anyone knows the history behind it?

GBA
3 years ago

The Palm Cottage is significant as the last known structure in Miami directly associated with Henry M. Flagler and the early years of the city’s development. The building is also the earliest known residential building remaining in downtown Miami and reflects the city’s development near the turn-of-the-century. Although moved from its original location while retaining its orientation, the Palm Cottage is a one-of-a-kind structure in downtown Miami and the only building of its type, age, and size still standing in the area.

The Palm Cottage was one of at least 30 houses built along today’s s. E. 1st and 2nd Streets near N. E. 2nd Avenue.

The Palm Cottage is the only building project directly associated with Flagler that has survived twentieth century development.
The building is the last known structure in Miami associated with Flagler’s productive life and the only one remaining in downtown Miami from the last years of the nineteenth century.

emilio estefan
3 years ago

who is behind the llc?

Pali
3 years ago

The shack is tiny but i gues it could be restored to its original conditions. But an ultra minimalistic glass box would look super awesome in that site along with an Enea landscape

Anonymous
3 years ago

This a joke?

Sam
3 years ago

I read somewhere that the house was once moved from a different location and was brought to this park. So it was never part of this park so it could technically be moved to another location to have something more contemporary.

Miami Hurricane
3 years ago

Would something from the 50’s be more contemporary?

Anonymous
3 years ago

Why not capitalize on that architectural style to build more in Miami?

Anonymous
3 years ago

Because people like “ultra minimalistic glass box” Pali don’t care about our heritage and call turning every city into Brasilia 2.0 “progress.” Folk Victorian, as the style is called, is appreciated and still built in other parts of the country without looking fake and kitschy. Ironically, one of our native firms, Duany Plater-Zyberk (DPZ), does a lot of said work.