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Sneak Peek: 'Tribal Chic' Muze At Met Square With Tequesta Indian Circle Observation

Sneak Peek: ‘Tribal Chic’ Muze At Met Square With Tequesta Indian Circle Observation

Construction is nearing completion at the 43-story, 391-unit Met Square apartment tower, where several historic elements will be on display.

At two opposite corners of the property, there are historic Tequesta Indian circles on display to the public, one of which is outdoors. The other is in a glass enclosed gallery and exhibit area.

Also on display will be some of Miami’s more recent history. A Fort Dallas well from the 19th Century will be visible through glass, while a plaza in between Met Square and Met 1 is to have elements from the Royal Palm Hotel, which opened in 1897. The original Miami River shoreline will be marked in the plaza.

An apartment tower known as Muze is being designed with ‘tribal chic’ interiors, the architect has said.

PreviouslyHere’s How Met Square Will Showcase Historic Remnants

 

 

A glass-enclosed observation area of a Tequesta Indian circle is located in front:

Inside the historic observation area. At the opposite corner of the property, another circle is on display outdoors:

The under-construction lobby of the apartment tower. It is said to feature “tribal chic” interior design:

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Anonymous
Anonymous

An important cultural and historical landmark turned into a condo lobby. Its a metaphor for Miami itself.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Central American & Western South American Native American structures > North America flechas with holes in the ground.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Last time I check all South Americans were “Flechas” until Europeans arrived with guns and better structures 🙂

Anonymous
Anonymous

Different people, despite what the “mainstream” revisionist anthropologists claim. The Americas were inhabited by more than Red Indians centuries before Columbus.

Anonymous
Anonymous

the metaphor being that people for centuries have liked living near the river?

Anonymous
Anonymous

What “important cultural and historical landmark?” I don’t see anything in those pictures.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Exactly. This dysfunctional little burg is desperate for some history and will grasp at anything– including holes in the ground. http://bit.ly/2IM9UkF

Anonymous
Anonymous

thank you for closing this one off

Anonymous
Anonymous

Cool idea, crappy execution and architecture.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Im glad they’re closing it off, when I visited SilverSpot it looked like it was going to stay that way.

Anonymous
Anonymous

theres 2 separate sites on this plot, one will remain an open air homeless shelter and toilet the other one is closed off…miami.