Study Shows Over 30M Square Feet Likely To Be Developed In Downtown’s Flagler Street Area

The Flagler Street area of Downtown Miami’s Central Business District is likely to see over 30 million square feet in new development, a new study says.

Gridics analyzed development potential in the Downtown Historic Area based on Miami 21 zoning regulations and allowances, in a study prepared for the city to help plan for future infrastructure needs.

Over 26 million square feet in new development is likely along Flagler Street and to the areas north and south, based on zoning regulations and allowances.

Another 17 historic sites could see 8 million square feet in additional development.

Gridics says the study will help save the city and utilities companies millions, by helping plan infrastructure needs.  Road improvement projects are already underway that could need to be torn up in the future to meet demand for new utilities without proper planning, the company said.

 

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Anonymous

Based on the fact that Mana and a few other slum lords own all this real estate I doubt a fraction of this estimate will come to fruition anytime soon.

Anonymous

“howing what infrastructure should be put in place now while road improvement projects are already underway.” This makes alot of sense, instead of digging up the road for every new project and then repaving the streets over and over.

Anonymous

A lot of Manas properties listed here as “most likely to be developed” now thats funny!

Anonymous

This level of density would create a truly walkable downtown even in the hot weather with tens of thousands of homes and destinations within a few blocks. However, it would also create enough additional vehicular traffic to completely overwhelm the access streets into downtown. It is revealing that the primary purpose of the study is not at all linked to planning for the transit required to support this density but simply for saving the cost of repaving streets after replacing below ground utilities. That cost will be the least important issue with this scenario.

SRS

Well, every corner in downtown has potential to be developed in the near future, I know that without having to make a study. Unfortunately planning for the future demand has been of little interest for our city leaders; the same we can say about solving the city present problems.

Anonymous

Lol at all the existing buildings that, according to this “study”, would be demolished and rebuilt… Like the Southeast Financial Center and One Biscayne… or the recently completed X Miami apartments. This is what happens when you let artificial “intelligence” replace humans; rational decision-making based on real world and market data (not found in Miami 21) becomes absent. What a waste of a “study.”

Anonymous

Also, many historic mid and high-rise buildings. It would make better sense to transfer the air rights from them and build taller isn’t of a ridiculous crew-cut canyon of skyscrapers which will never occur.

Anonymous

Yes, it’s asinine to assume TDRs will be transferred from one building to its neighbor. The old churches, banks, etc. in the CBD won’t collectively transfer their development rights to every parcel within a 2 block radius. Insane.

Anonymous

All day Trolley please

Building Hugger

We could use infill urban park space. I don’t mean a central park but at least some planning effort to incorporate green spaces and plazas for pedestrians to congregate. And I don’t mean bullshit patches of grass with one tree. Something well planned and incorporated into the urban fold. We don’t want to evolve into a bleak concrete jungle.

Gene

Let’s just develop Bayfront and Farre Parks. Who needs any green space in Miami?

Anonymous

Plazas yes. Parks no.

Anonymous

Yeah….like a a big park extending from Flagler all the way up to 13th Street or so.
It would be even better if the park had like an amphitheater, some sort of out side shopping venue.
Maybe on the WATERFRONT!
And the city could locate a sporting venue, and maybe a science museum, and/or an art museum.
That would be great…

Anonymous

Gee people, stop whining, you’re getting a long Park under the Metrorail in Brickell called Underline, and a Park under the $800 million dollar Signature Bridge.

Anonymous

LOL, would be total gridlock with 100,000 new parking spaces.

Anonymous

Totally agree.
This area does not need parking. It is the CBD

Anonymous

Every office tower proposal has giant parking garages though at the bottom.

Miami needs parking maximums not minimums.

Anonymous

Egg or chicken? We have to begin transitioning at one point.

Anonymous

A Mass Transportation System is needed ASAP

Anonymous

This is just a massive “what if” scenario. Yes, these heights are legally possible through zoning, permitting, etc., but not every investor/developer has a desire to go after the biggest. The market dictates what investors and developers should build through demand. There’s no demand for a super block of 1,000′ buildings identical in height and size. I can’t even think of enough uses and activities to fill 30M SF that would generate enough positive pro forma to entice multiple developers and investors to jump on board.

Anonymous

This is a zoning study. Not architecture renderings!

Anonymous

Still a highly hypothetical zoning study. A useless zoning study given the premise for it. Considering this is to be “forward thinking” on power needs, they should have used taxpayer dollars to look into renewables for a denser downtown instead of a hypothetical build out that’s allowed per the zoning code. I’m not sure what part of my original comment indicated I thought these were architectural renderings? It’s not in any sense a realistic zoning “study.” What this did was take the zoning code and assume max build out of everything. Doesn’t take a rocket scientist to read a code and figure out “potential” under a scenario of max build out.

Anonymous

Excellent analysis by Gridics!!

POLO

The narrow downtown streets cannot handle that kind of density!