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Swire: Brickell On Track To Become Second Most Densely Populated Area In America

Brickell will soon become the second densest neighborhood in the United States, according to Swire Properties.

“By the time all of the residential projects being built in Brickell are finished, which will be in the next two or three years, Brickell will be the densest residential neighborhood in the U.S. after Manhattan,” Swire CEO Guy Bradley told investors at conference last week.

“Ten years ago nobody would have thought that possible. It’s absolutely staggering.”

Swire remains highly bullish on Miami, and particularly Brickell, which the company sees as becoming the center of the area. The company is now looking at additional development opportunities around Brickell.

The developer has already invested about $1 billion in the first phase of Brickell City Centre, Bradley said, and believes that there has already been another $1 billion invested in surrounding real estate projects.

The second phase of Brickell City Centre, currently in permitting, will more than double the scale of the project “as of when we decide to kick that off.” It will be contained in a single 80-story tower, which Bradley said required special FAA approval.

 

 

 

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46 Comments on "Swire: Brickell On Track To Become Second Most Densely Populated Area In America"

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Anonymous
Anonymous

Are they counting dwelling units or people that actually live there year round? I couldn’t imagine it is most dense by population when factoring in absentee owners.

Domitius Ahenobarbus
Domitius Ahenobarbus

The proportion of seasonal occupancy in most of Brickell’s existing buildings is around 5% (a fact evinced by a lender-held recent compilation of Brickell condo questionnaires). Given the historic tendency of foreign investment in prior cycles, this proportion is an indication of future occupancy composition favoring end users. Thus the unit-count is an appropriate basis for calculating density propensities.

Marc306
Marc306

That number will easily shoot through the roof with this round of South American money condos finishing up.

Anonymous
Anonymous

how many units did the former president of argentina buy with stolen money??? he already is on record for buying 60 properties….

Anonymous
Anonymous

Exactly! Units vs residents are completely different metrics!

Anonymous
Anonymous

I think it’s quite clear the best area to be in will be Downtown…. And I don’t mean Brickell or Edgewater or Midtown but the CBD. It will be smack in the middle of everything with the best transportation grid in the county, the most walkable, Bayfront Park right in front of it, neither Brickell or Edgewater have similar parks to compete plus right in front of the Bay. Bayside, Brightline, Metrorail, Metromover, Trolleys, the Port of Miami, the Arena, this is not counting all the new stuff coming our way plus the Miami World Center and drum roll: We will soon also have the tallest building in Florida.

I.Know.Miami
I.Know.Miami

this is great news for Edgewater, in the next 3-5 years Edgewater and like areas will experience massive growth. Miami was already considered the fifth best place to invest, especially downtown, in the entire world. see link:

https://therealdeal.com/miami/2017/10/01/the-top-five-neighborhoods-to-invest-in-around-the-world/

The boom is being noticed and will be experienced. People want vibrant areas to live and Miami has all the vibrancy and the world is noticing.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Edgewater has no public transit. Brickell does.

Anonymous
Anonymous

FAKE NEWS!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Wrong.. check your facts.. 2 metro mover stations + trolley (Free)

Suomynona
Suomynona

Metro mover? Lol

The closest station is a mile or more from most Edgewater residents.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Trolley can act as stop gap

Anonymous
Anonymous

and a half ass job market that pays way less for the same work found in other metropolitan areas…low pay scale and lack of economic diversity versus foreign bubble investment my boy

Anonymous
Anonymous

It truly is quite the dense vertical suburb!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Suburb to what ? It’s the center

Anonymous
Anonymous

Yeah, sure….daytime foot traffic can’t closely compare to even San Francisco or Chicago, let alone Manhattan. Who cares though? 80 degree winters and no state income tax are what counts.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Just what you Density f*ckBoi’s want ! and who would know more about densing the shite out of a place than Swire out of HK !

Anonymous
Anonymous

Unlikely that this is correct but Brickell does have a high level of density, no point in arguing if it’s the highest in the US or the universe. What it doesn’t have that most other DESIRABLE high density neighborhoods have is a high quality public realm. The streets, sidewalks, crosswalks and public spaces are poorly designed and in poor condition. Every crosswalk in Brickell should be state of the art pavers or interesting asphalt paving. In fact most of them are bumpy and faded out basic white lines.

The biggest open space in the area, the area under the metrorail tracks which stretches for 5 blocks or more, is just an open field of overgrown weeds and trash.

The centerpiece open cafe area, MBV, is a dated styrofoam building material fake Mediterranean revival design that is just embarrassing.

With all the people who live and work there, Brickell deserves a much higher quality public realm. The street edges of BCC and the plaza at 600 Brickell set the standard for needed public realm improvements.

Fredric
Fredric

All that you say is true. However, what is most important is the trajectory, not the current, existing condition. Please take note that the entire city of Miami was basically a second-rate town that was not on anyone’s national or international radar screen a mere three or four decades ago. LA was already a long-established, world-class city back then, to say nothing of NYC or Chicago. Brickell was a quiet zone of mid-rise office buildings and condos just 20 years ago and now look at it! The needed improvements to the public realm will be coming very soon, as the rapid-paced and macro-scale transformation of Miami continues apace.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Very well put. Agreed x 1000

Danny
Danny

Just give us more affordable housing in the downtown and Brickell core!

Anonymous
Anonymous

I prefer Edgewater …… is close to everything and less chaotic

Anonymous
Anonymous

Do you actually live in Edgewater?
What do you mean close to everything? You still have to get in the car to go to Publix. We have Whole Foods walking distance

Anonymous
Anonymous

Close to everything my are. You have to drive to go anywhere unless you are right on 15th near the last metro mover stop.

Anonymous
Anonymous

but … but .. but … DENSITY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anonymous
Anonymous

Completely agree

Anonymous
Anonymous

It’s going to be greater than Chicago’s Near North Side – 32,000/sq mi?

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is “according to Swire…” obviously take this with a a grain of salt. It suits their agenda.

AndrewN
AndrewN

I had that same question.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I don’t know about the new projects, but my building from 2006 is always full and I have had the same neighbors the past 2 years. The walkabilty of Brickell and its proximity to the Metrorail (easy airport access) and the metromover (museums, arena, etc) make it a great value despite expensive rents.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I like it

Yohan Perez
Yohan Perez

Edgewater is better. Parking Availability, Less traffic, smack in the middle and equidistant to brickell/downtown, Wynwood, Midtown, Design District and South Beach and the water views are the best in all of Miami.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Less Traffic? Bisycane is bumper/bumper 12 hours in that area.

aceraroja
aceraroja

What is wrong with this dude? His hyperbole is disconcerting, he seems unstable. I can think of ten LA neighborhoods with more people per sqkm than lol Brickell. Just think about it for two seconds. A couple hundred residents per highrise slash car-storage facility, each one half a block or so. Versus any random area in even farther-out Queens or even Miami Beach or Little Havana ffs. Smaller buildings but more densely packed and more people in each unit.

Walter
Walter

no problem with me If they first look at flooding sewerage before they continue

looks they forget ,15 years ago we did not get such flodding in Brickell ,and is not Climate change ,is negligence

Anonymous
Anonymous

Thanks God!! that we have this public transportation system and a comprehensive development plan in place to deal with the population increase……I just can find a copy of it but I heard is been delivered in a bus and I better hurry up before the bridge opens or I am going to be late.
The City of Miami is 20 years behind and incapable of dealing with this!

Anonymous
Anonymous

So the super tall at BCC is present in this shot, but the near completed Panorama and Echo are missing…

OG Show
OG Show

The Pace Park area of Edgewater is a much better central location. I work out in Brickell at a gym there – awful area in that the roads don’t support the traffic, area floods, and you are trapped with that stupid drawbridge. Funny to see the comments in support. Do you even live here?

MIAMI
MIAMI

I prefer Miami 10 years ago! I don’t understand why people like concrete so much? it’s all cement and 6 trees!.

SRS
SRS

Well, 10 years ago was 4 trees….development has planted more trees than what we had before

MIAMI
MIAMI

What?!? Do you remember the land where City Brickell Center is on??

Anonymous
Anonymous

They were mostly tennis courts.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Well, then move to Tampa…

Anonymous
Anonymous

Pretty accurate view of Tampa. It’s Miami years ago. I think the new downtown development will help the city explode in its own right

Anonymous
Anonymous

True, but Tampa lacks a certain amount of international allure that Miami has.

Anonymous
Anonymous

for money launderers

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