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This Is The Tequesta Indian Circle Being Preserved At Met Square Construction Site

Below are photos of one of two circles being preserved at the Met Square construction site, both of which are believed to be linked to the Tequesta Indians.

It appears that the circle will remain outdoors, protected with a small glass railing. In 2014, the architect had said that it would be encased in glass, and renderings showed it in an indoor space.

The photos below are of the south west corner. A second circle is said to be preserved at the north east corner, with a gallery operated by History Miami open to the public.

A crawl space is being left underneath to allow for future discoveries, and the interior of the apartment building on the site is inspired by the Tequesta with a “tribal chic” motif.

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25 Comments on "This Is The Tequesta Indian Circle Being Preserved At Met Square Construction Site"

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Anonymous
Anonymous

Welcome to Miami, where renderings rarely match reality.

Anonymous
Anonymous

this is a great example

Marc305
Marc305

Enclosing this circle gave it an appearance of an exhibit being displayed at a Museum. Leaving it open, makes it look like an unfinished fountain. Come on Miami it’s not too late, you can do better.

Gables
Gables

Too bad the developers weren’t obligated to preserve the circle as they said they would. This is a unique pre-historic piece of our city and it is being treated in a half-assed way. How many other major American cities have pre-historic indigenous ruins preserved in the heart of downtown? We are not appreciating our uniqueness. Rome, Italy provides many great examples of how to successfully incorporate historic preservation into modern buildings.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I often compare downtown Miami to Rome. Their Macy’s has slightly fewer homeless laying at the entrance, though.

Gables
Gables

I didn’t compare Miami to Rome. I stated that Rome provides an example of how we can preserve history in a modern city. Tip: Please read and thoroughly comprehend before making a snarky comment. 😉

Miami Hurricane
Miami Hurricane

Romans don’t get wild much these days. The saying should be “When in Miami, do as Miamians do”.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I think its a fitting metaphor for this city. A few glimmers of authenticity being obscured by out of control commercialism.

Anonymous
Anonymous

this needs to be changed while they have crews there, Miami can’t not have one jack ass devolpered mess up history because they are a cheapskate. FIX THIS NOW

Anonymous
Anonymous

they made it look like a unfinished garbage pit, yes the project is unfinished and yes it’s a pit but it shouldn’t be that horrible looking especially when the renderings were clearly ignored when they were the only ones approved.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Typical deception by local developers to get their way and then not come through with their promise, and shame on the City of Miami for letting them get away with it.

anonymous
anonymous

Looks like a bad Stargate movie.

suomynona
suomynona

It just looks like a hole.

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is how the Miami Circle should have been handled: preserve, enclose, and build over it.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Like Sargent Shultz on Hogan’s heroes would say “I SEE NOTHING!!!”

Anonymous
Anonymous

Too bad a Walmart didn’t go on top of it. That way both the wacko preservationists and metrosexual hipsters could be pissed off equally.

Anonymous
Anonymous

You surely typed this with one hand, didn’t you champ?

Anonymous
Anonymous

I know it’s not preserved properly but anything is better than nothing for an insignificant archaeological piece of nothing.
All you preservationists out there, how many times have you been there to see it?

District Worker
District Worker

First, it’s not insignificant. Visit HistoryMiami to get sense of the site’s importance. Two, attitudes and beliefs that this is a “piece of nothing” are what cause cities to lose unique historic character. This is a problem for people who want to preserve one of a kind archaeological sites, historic buildings, etc. This is also a problem for economic vitality of a city. Singapore is a great example. As the city quickly developed after the 1960s, many historic structures were lost. The city quickly realized that these structures gave the city a unique charm that added to the quality of life and encouraged even greater development. Most people and businesses want to be in place with character. As a result, Singapore has desperatly tried to preserve any remaining pieces of history and has even replicated what has lost to try to add back the character that was taken away. If you don’t value history, then I hope you can at least value economic and development reasons for preservation.

Anonymous
Anonymous

I laugh at people like you who are so adamant about making something out of nothing. There was nothing of any significance found on this site in the first place so stop trying to compare what’s dug up in Miami to this or that city that are much much older.

Somebody played with your mind and heart strings and you fell head over heels for the con.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Here’s a post from way back in 2006 re how these things could have been preserved and still build something iconic above it: http://bit.ly/29W8mlW

Anonymous
Anonymous

This is such a let down from what was promised. Make City hold developer to its promise.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Don’t blame the developer. It was one person who wanted to “feel” important to the city of Miami and he’s the one who went digging around and found nothing but scraps of old wood, steps on the site of the first hotel built downtown that a hurricane destroyed in the 1920’s, a few pieces of old pottery that was made by the Indians who lived there long ago, and some old fish bones and skeletons.

If you don’t believe what I’m saying, do some research on your own about this site.

Anonymous
Anonymous

Miami starts to look like a great metropolitan city………..

Anonymous
Anonymous

Que the outrage over a WHITE and glass box encroaching on an indigenous cultural site.

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