This Presentation Explains Exactly Where And How You Can Build Your 1,049-Foot Tower In Miami

If you’re looking to build a 1,000-foot tower in Miami but confused by height restriction rules, this presentation might be for you.

It explains how two separate agencies oversee those restrictions, and how each has its own rules and approval process (although they do generally align).

The tallest that you can build under Miami-Dade Aviation rules is 1,049 feet above sea level, but that must be in a specific zone, mostly in downtown Miami and Brickell.

Here is the presentation in full, prepared by Miami-Dade Aviation officials for the city of Miami, and dated November 2017:

 

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Anonymous
3 years ago

Perfect for my plan for a 1000′ parking garage!

Anonymous
3 years ago

Love the idea lol. hopefully they are quadruplets 1000′ parking garage over looking Biscayne Blvd!

Anonymous
3 years ago

Finally a plan we can all agree on.

Anonymous
3 years ago

* Where *Is *The *Lie! at last a plan that brings us together!

Anonymous
3 years ago

Truth is, the Miam-Dade Aviation Department can only speculate on possible height hazards. Therefore, they would rather come up with ridiculous height limits to pacify the airlines.

Anonymous
3 years ago

I see that 1,200 area. Let’s do it

Anonymous
3 years ago

Why not? Heck, you’re talking about another 151ft.

Bill
3 years ago

I was in One Biscayne Tower, on the 37th floor in 1986, when a cargo plane came out of MIA and couldn’t get lift. It roared past the 37th floor, over what was then the Columbus Bazzar. It’s wing tips no more than 10 feet from the building. If the current building at 2 North Biscayne Boulevard had been there then, it would have been firey disaster similar to 9/11.

Anonymous
3 years ago

And that is why I keep saying that a building’s height is not the hazard, a malfunctioning plane is.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Planes will from time to time malfunction. It should be the airport’s responsibility to build runways that avoid downtown, irregardless of the airine. After all, downtown was there before these runways were built. Both takeoff and approaches should be directed away from the city. It’s called a “go around”.

Anonymous
3 years ago

I agree wholeheartedly with you.

Anonymous
3 years ago

The real hazard is gravity.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Interesting that the study altogether leaves out the area south of 15th street in Brickell but includes vast swaths of Little Havana.

Anonymous
3 years ago

South of 15th Street isn’t in a direct flight path of a runway.

Polo
3 years ago

Yes, runway 12/30 path is south of 15th Street.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Change the damn runway. Demand that airlines go around the boundaries.

Anonymous
3 years ago

Buddy Miami Avenue is NOT little Havana

No.
3 years ago

Love how the commenters here are always absolutely obsessed with building height and basically nothing else. Most Miami, pissing race mentality ever.

Anonymous
3 years ago

If you have no concern whatsoever, why are you commenting on how people in Miami are responding to this article?

Anonymous
3 years ago

You tell him! uhum